Architectural Heritage Center, 701 Southeast Grand Avenue, Portland, OR 97214, United States

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Future Events

Saturday
Apr
8
2017
Saturday, April 8, 2017 at 10am through Thursday, June 29, 2017 at 11:30am
10am through Thursday, June 29 at 11:30am
Perhaps no other entrepreneur had such an impact on 20th century Portland as Fred G. Meyer. In the 1920s, Meyer began building his “One-Stop Shopping” stores around the Portland area. Please join us for the encore presentation as Fred Leeson presents the story of Fred Meyer, putting his life and work in context with the stores he built. Portland architects Fred and William Claussen play an important role in the story, as they designed some of Meyer’s first stores, along with several other notable Portland buildings including the Roosevelt Hotel and Laurelhurst School. In addition to his volunteer work with the Bosco-Milligan Foundation/Architectural Heritage Center, Leeson is also the author of the recent biography of Fred G. Meyer, My-Te-Fine Merchant: Fred Meyer’s Retail Revolution (2014). As a special treat, Fred will be offering a FREE copy of his book to the first 60 people that register for this talk.
Saturday, April 8, 2017 at 10am through Thursday, June 15, 2017 at noon
10am through Thursday, June 15 at noon
Downtown Portland contains an extensive collection of classically influenced buildings, many of which are clad with glazed terra cotta, a building material that was at its height of popularity in the early 20th century. You’ll see the city’s first “skyscraper”, a bank that could have been a Greek temple and learn about several architects from this period who left an indelible impression on Portland including A.E. Doyle, the firm of Whidden and Lewis, and the Reid Brothers from San Francisco.
Tuesday
Apr
11
2017
Tuesday, April 11, 2017 at 10am through Tuesday, June 27, 2017 at noon
10am through Tuesday, June 27 at noon
Take a whirlwind tour of the entire range of Portland's architectural history. You’ll learn about the first wooden structures near the river as well as the elaborate cast iron, stone and terra cotta decorated buildings of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. From there you will be transported into the modern age and the sleek designs of Pietro Belluschi and the Post Modernism of Michael Graves.
Tuesday
Apr
18
2017
Tuesday, April 18, 2017 at 10am through Tuesday, June 27, 2017 at noon
10am through Tuesday, June 27 at noon
The commercial district near the famous Skidmore Fountain and the oldest standing buildings in downtown comprise this fascinating tour of Portland’s only National Landmark Historic District. You’ll see the work of Portland’s earliest architects, learning how cast iron played a central role in their designs and how the city developed so close to the river. Along the way, you’ll also learn about some beautiful, but long-lost, buildings while also seeing great examples of historic preservation.
Saturday
Apr
22
2017
Saturday, April 22, 2017 at 10am through Tuesday, June 27, 2017 at noon
10am through Tuesday, June 27 at noon
Exploring the heart of Portland’s late-nineteenth century commercial district, this tour is packed with the names of prominent city pioneers who made their mark as merchants, developers, and architects as well as providing some of the city’s finest examples of cast iron, Richardsonian Romanesque and Classical architecture. You’ll learn about the Willamette river’s first bridge, the first public market, and our first Chinatown as we also discuss how the district was at the forefront of downtown preservation efforts in the 1970s.
Tuesday
Apr
25
2017
Tuesday, April 25, 2017 at 10am through Tuesday, June 27, 2017 at noon
10am through Tuesday, June 27 at noon
This eleven-block downtown area was first platted and donated to the City in 1852, transforming a fire break parcel into the most desirable residential area of its day –complete with schools, playgrounds, stately homes and places of worship. Come take a stroll through the groves of elms and recount some of the stories they would love to tell about the area’s history and architecture. The South Park Blocks stand alone as a place of revitalization, refreshment and cultural allure.
Saturday
Apr
29
2017
Saturday, April 29, 2017 at 10am through Tuesday, June 27, 2017 at noon
10am through Tuesday, June 27 at noon
This exciting new tour explores the abundant architectural and cultural history in the downtown neighborhood wedged between Old Town and the Pearl District. Along the way you’ll see 19th century gems, like the Mariner’s Home building which has just been rehabilitated and turned into the Society Hotel. You’ll also learn how the area became New Chinatown, and later Japantown, and you’ll see some landmark buildings like Union Station, the US Custom House, and even a historic fire station.
Tuesday
May
2
2017
Tuesday, May 2, 2017 at 10am through Thursday, June 15, 2017 at noon
10am through Thursday, June 15 at noon
Downtown Portland contains an extensive collection of classically influenced buildings, many of which are clad with glazed terra cotta, a building material that was at its height of popularity in the early 20th century. You’ll see the city’s first “skyscraper”, a bank that could have been a Greek temple and learn about several architects from this period who left an indelible impression on Portland including A.E. Doyle, the firm of Whidden and Lewis, and the Reid Brothers from San Francisco.
Thursday
May
4
2017
Thursday, May 4, 2017 at 6pm through Tuesday, June 27, 2017 at 8pm
6pm through Tuesday, June 27 at 8pm
This exciting new tour explores the abundant architectural and cultural history in the downtown neighborhood wedged between Old Town and the Pearl District. Along the way you’ll see 19th century gems, like the Mariner’s Home building which has just been rehabilitated and turned into the Society Hotel. You’ll also learn how the area became New Chinatown, and later Japantown, and you’ll see some landmark buildings like Union Station, the US Custom House, and even a historic fire station.
Saturday
May
6
2017
Saturday, May 6, 2017 at 10am through Tuesday, June 27, 2017 at noon
10am through Tuesday, June 27 at noon
The commercial district near the famous Skidmore Fountain and the oldest standing buildings in downtown comprise this fascinating tour of Portland’s only National Landmark Historic District. You’ll see the work of Portland’s earliest architects, learning how cast iron played a central role in their designs and how the city developed so close to the river. Along the way, you’ll also learn about some beautiful, but long-lost, buildings while also seeing great examples of historic preservation.

Past Events

Saturday
May
27
2017
Saturday, May 27, 2017 at 10am through Tuesday, June 27, 2017 at noon
10am through Tuesday, June 27 at noon
Once farmland, the Eastmoreland Neighborhood is known throughout Portland for its undulating pattern of dense, tree-lined streets and landscaped yards. The housing in Eastmoreland was largely constructed between 1925 and 1940 and displays the variety of architectural styles popular at the time.
Tuesday
May
23
2017
Tuesday, May 23, 2017 at 10am through Tuesday, June 27, 2017 at noon
10am through Tuesday, June 27 at noon
Named for pioneering Portland lawyer and newspaper editor William Lair Hill, this residential neighborhood is one of Portland’s oldest. Lair Hill contains a fascinating mix of historic homes, along with notable buildings significant for their connections to the city’s early immigrant populations. It’s also a neighborhood that was impacted by urban renewal and freeway development.
Saturday
May
20
2017
Saturday, May 20, 2017 at 10am through Tuesday, June 27, 2017 at noon
10am through Tuesday, June 27 at noon
Exploring the heart of Portland’s late-nineteenth century commercial district, this tour is packed with the names of prominent city pioneers who made their mark as merchants, developers, and architects as well as providing some of the city’s finest examples of cast iron, Richardsonian Romanesque and Classical architecture. You’ll learn about the Willamette river’s first bridge, the first public market, and our first Chinatown as we also discuss how the district was at the forefront of downtown preservation efforts in the 1970s.
Saturday, May 20, 2017 at 10am through Thursday, June 29, 2017 at 11:30am
10am through Thursday, June 29 at 11:30am
The most reproduced of Minor White's photographs of Portland in the late 1930s and early 1940s are of the cast-iron fronted commercial buildings and blocks along Front Avenue and nearby streets. But White moved across the city, from the Willamette to the West Hills, taking photos of Portlanders and their city, public buildings, workplaces, homes, and businesses, with insight and affection. This presentation will center on White's lesser-known photographs and favorite subjects in Portland, with unpublished examples and time for questions and discussion.
Thursday
May
18
2017
Thursday, May 18, 2017 at 7pm through Thursday, June 29, 2017 at 8:30pm
7pm through Thursday, June 29 at 8:30pm
Dr. Kenneth Hawkins will present an overview of Minor White's work as "creative photographer" for the Federal Art Project and Oregon Art Project of the U.S. Works Progress Administration. White photographed the cast-iron fronted buildings in the city's former business center as they fell to mass demolition, the city's working riverfront, and houses small and grand. Dr. Hawkins compiled the first inventory of White's original WPA negatives at the Oregon Historical Society in 1978, and in 2016 helped the Minor White Archive, Princeton University Art Museum, describe its holdings of White's Portland works. His presentation will show how White used technique and artistry to create enduring records of Portland's past, and how the series of negatives and prints in these repositories and others comprise sequences that provide insight into his career, architectural loss, and historical memory.
Thursday, May 18, 2017 at 6pm through Tuesday, June 27, 2017 at 8pm
6pm through Tuesday, June 27 at 8pm
Downtown Portland contains an abundance of post-World War II architecture by Pietro Belluschi, Michael Graves, and the world-renowned firm of Skidmore, Owings & Merrill. This tour explores the southern portion of the central business district. You’ll learn about the controversial as well as the award winners, the architects and firms that designed them, and the issues of the times that led to such dramatic changes to our built environment and skyline.
Tuesday
May
16
2017
Tuesday, May 16, 2017 from 10am-noon
10am-noon
Over the last 20 years, the Pearl has been transformed from an outdated and tired industrial area into one of Portland’s premier residential and retail districts. A century ago, the area went through a similar transformation—from a working class housing area at the edge of a marsh to the city’s premier industrial and warehousing area. Many of Portland’s best known architects of the period designed buildings for important local and national companies. Most of these buildings remain, with their exteriors intact and new uses inside.
Saturday
May
13
2017
Saturday, May 13, 2017 at 10am through Thursday, June 29, 2017 at noon
10am through Thursday, June 29 at noon
Contrary to the mass marketing that fills our mailboxes, original windows can be refreshed and repaired to meet today’s energy savings goals. At the same time, preserving original windows also preserves historic character and re-uses material that is inherently sustainable. This workshop covers the basics of identifying problems and repairing the wood windows in our older homes. Original wood windows are the “eyes of a building” and contribute tremendous charm and authenticity to our older homes. But after many years of openings and closings, coupled with the impacts of seasonal weather changes, our windows can develop a set of maintenance needs that must be attended to. To address these issues, the AHC welcomes back Patty Spencer, owner of Fresh Air Sash Cord Repair Inc. Patty will share her years of experience in preserving and restoring the function of original, double-hung, wood windows found in homes built in the 1940s and earlier. With a focus on improving function, this workshop will cover the basics that owners of older homes should know, including: signs of window deterioration, preventive maintenance measures, good maintenance and repair practices, plus good ideas about weatherization. Window replacement is not a cost-effective means of saving energy, and is certainly not “green.” If you love your original, double-hung windows, but just wish they worked better - they can! Come learn to do-it-yourself from a local expert.
Saturday, May 13, 2017 at 10am through Tuesday, June 27, 2017 at noon
10am through Tuesday, June 27 at noon
This tour rambles through a stunning neighborhood on the west side of Mt. Tabor Park. From the former Baseline Road, now Stark Street, you’ll meander past numerous fine residences, as well as a school, church, and hospital. This area retains much of the freshness and beautiful views today that made it a popular place to build beginning in the 1880s and continuing well into the 20th century.
Thursday
May
11
2017
Thursday, May 11, 2017 at 6pm through Tuesday, June 27, 2017 at 8pm
6pm through Tuesday, June 27 at 8pm
This Modernism tour looks at Portland skyscrapers from the oldest to the near-tallest and most recent. The fingerprints of iconic architect Pietro Belluschi are on five buildings on this tour including, perhaps, his most famous of all. Other stops include the work of modern masters Richard Sundeleaf, Skidmore Owings & Merrill, and Zimmer Gunsul Frasca. We'll also look at three "modern" public plazas and discuss reasons for success or failure of those designs.