Architectural Heritage Center, 701 Southeast Grand Avenue, Portland, OR 97214, United States

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Future Events

Saturday
Apr
8
2017
Saturday, April 8, 2017 at 10am through Thursday, June 29, 2017 at 11:30am
10am through Thursday, June 29 at 11:30am
Perhaps no other entrepreneur had such an impact on 20th century Portland as Fred G. Meyer. In the 1920s, Meyer began building his “One-Stop Shopping” stores around the Portland area. Please join us for the encore presentation as Fred Leeson presents the story of Fred Meyer, putting his life and work in context with the stores he built. Portland architects Fred and William Claussen play an important role in the story, as they designed some of Meyer’s first stores, along with several other notable Portland buildings including the Roosevelt Hotel and Laurelhurst School. In addition to his volunteer work with the Bosco-Milligan Foundation/Architectural Heritage Center, Leeson is also the author of the recent biography of Fred G. Meyer, My-Te-Fine Merchant: Fred Meyer’s Retail Revolution (2014). As a special treat, Fred will be offering a FREE copy of his book to the first 60 people that register for this talk.
Saturday, April 8, 2017 at 10am through Thursday, June 15, 2017 at noon
10am through Thursday, June 15 at noon
Downtown Portland contains an extensive collection of classically influenced buildings, many of which are clad with glazed terra cotta, a building material that was at its height of popularity in the early 20th century. You’ll see the city’s first “skyscraper”, a bank that could have been a Greek temple and learn about several architects from this period who left an indelible impression on Portland including A.E. Doyle, the firm of Whidden and Lewis, and the Reid Brothers from San Francisco.
Tuesday
Apr
11
2017
Tuesday, April 11, 2017 at 10am through Tuesday, June 27, 2017 at noon
10am through Tuesday, June 27 at noon
Take a whirlwind tour of the entire range of Portland's architectural history. You’ll learn about the first wooden structures near the river as well as the elaborate cast iron, stone and terra cotta decorated buildings of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. From there you will be transported into the modern age and the sleek designs of Pietro Belluschi and the Post Modernism of Michael Graves.
Tuesday
Apr
18
2017
Tuesday, April 18, 2017 at 10am through Tuesday, June 27, 2017 at noon
10am through Tuesday, June 27 at noon
The commercial district near the famous Skidmore Fountain and the oldest standing buildings in downtown comprise this fascinating tour of Portland’s only National Landmark Historic District. You’ll see the work of Portland’s earliest architects, learning how cast iron played a central role in their designs and how the city developed so close to the river. Along the way, you’ll also learn about some beautiful, but long-lost, buildings while also seeing great examples of historic preservation.
Saturday
Apr
22
2017
Saturday, April 22, 2017 at 10am through Tuesday, June 27, 2017 at noon
10am through Tuesday, June 27 at noon
Exploring the heart of Portland’s late-nineteenth century commercial district, this tour is packed with the names of prominent city pioneers who made their mark as merchants, developers, and architects as well as providing some of the city’s finest examples of cast iron, Richardsonian Romanesque and Classical architecture. You’ll learn about the Willamette river’s first bridge, the first public market, and our first Chinatown as we also discuss how the district was at the forefront of downtown preservation efforts in the 1970s.
Tuesday
Apr
25
2017
Tuesday, April 25, 2017 at 10am through Tuesday, June 27, 2017 at noon
10am through Tuesday, June 27 at noon
This eleven-block downtown area was first platted and donated to the City in 1852, transforming a fire break parcel into the most desirable residential area of its day –complete with schools, playgrounds, stately homes and places of worship. Come take a stroll through the groves of elms and recount some of the stories they would love to tell about the area’s history and architecture. The South Park Blocks stand alone as a place of revitalization, refreshment and cultural allure.
Saturday
Apr
29
2017
Saturday, April 29, 2017 at 10am through Tuesday, June 27, 2017 at noon
10am through Tuesday, June 27 at noon
This exciting new tour explores the abundant architectural and cultural history in the downtown neighborhood wedged between Old Town and the Pearl District. Along the way you’ll see 19th century gems, like the Mariner’s Home building which has just been rehabilitated and turned into the Society Hotel. You’ll also learn how the area became New Chinatown, and later Japantown, and you’ll see some landmark buildings like Union Station, the US Custom House, and even a historic fire station.
Tuesday
May
2
2017
Tuesday, May 2, 2017 at 10am through Thursday, June 15, 2017 at noon
10am through Thursday, June 15 at noon
Downtown Portland contains an extensive collection of classically influenced buildings, many of which are clad with glazed terra cotta, a building material that was at its height of popularity in the early 20th century. You’ll see the city’s first “skyscraper”, a bank that could have been a Greek temple and learn about several architects from this period who left an indelible impression on Portland including A.E. Doyle, the firm of Whidden and Lewis, and the Reid Brothers from San Francisco.
Thursday
May
4
2017
Thursday, May 4, 2017 at 6pm through Tuesday, June 27, 2017 at 8pm
6pm through Tuesday, June 27 at 8pm
This exciting new tour explores the abundant architectural and cultural history in the downtown neighborhood wedged between Old Town and the Pearl District. Along the way you’ll see 19th century gems, like the Mariner’s Home building which has just been rehabilitated and turned into the Society Hotel. You’ll also learn how the area became New Chinatown, and later Japantown, and you’ll see some landmark buildings like Union Station, the US Custom House, and even a historic fire station.
Saturday
May
6
2017
Saturday, May 6, 2017 at 10am through Tuesday, June 27, 2017 at noon
10am through Tuesday, June 27 at noon
The commercial district near the famous Skidmore Fountain and the oldest standing buildings in downtown comprise this fascinating tour of Portland’s only National Landmark Historic District. You’ll see the work of Portland’s earliest architects, learning how cast iron played a central role in their designs and how the city developed so close to the river. Along the way, you’ll also learn about some beautiful, but long-lost, buildings while also seeing great examples of historic preservation.

Past Events

Saturday
Apr
22
2017
Saturday, April 22, 2017 at 10am through Tuesday, June 27, 2017 at noon
10am through Tuesday, June 27 at noon
Exploring the heart of Portland’s late-nineteenth century commercial district, this tour is packed with the names of prominent city pioneers who made their mark as merchants, developers, and architects as well as providing some of the city’s finest examples of cast iron, Richardsonian Romanesque and Classical architecture. You’ll learn about the Willamette river’s first bridge, the first public market, and our first Chinatown as we also discuss how the district was at the forefront of downtown preservation efforts in the 1970s.
Tuesday
Apr
18
2017
Tuesday, April 18, 2017 at 10am through Tuesday, June 27, 2017 at noon
10am through Tuesday, June 27 at noon
The commercial district near the famous Skidmore Fountain and the oldest standing buildings in downtown comprise this fascinating tour of Portland’s only National Landmark Historic District. You’ll see the work of Portland’s earliest architects, learning how cast iron played a central role in their designs and how the city developed so close to the river. Along the way, you’ll also learn about some beautiful, but long-lost, buildings while also seeing great examples of historic preservation.
Tuesday
Apr
11
2017
Tuesday, April 11, 2017 at 10am through Tuesday, June 27, 2017 at noon
10am through Tuesday, June 27 at noon
Take a whirlwind tour of the entire range of Portland's architectural history. You’ll learn about the first wooden structures near the river as well as the elaborate cast iron, stone and terra cotta decorated buildings of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. From there you will be transported into the modern age and the sleek designs of Pietro Belluschi and the Post Modernism of Michael Graves.
Saturday
Apr
8
2017
Saturday, April 8, 2017 at 10am through Thursday, June 15, 2017 at noon
10am through Thursday, June 15 at noon
Downtown Portland contains an extensive collection of classically influenced buildings, many of which are clad with glazed terra cotta, a building material that was at its height of popularity in the early 20th century. You’ll see the city’s first “skyscraper”, a bank that could have been a Greek temple and learn about several architects from this period who left an indelible impression on Portland including A.E. Doyle, the firm of Whidden and Lewis, and the Reid Brothers from San Francisco.
Saturday, April 8, 2017 at 10am through Thursday, June 29, 2017 at 11:30am
10am through Thursday, June 29 at 11:30am
Perhaps no other entrepreneur had such an impact on 20th century Portland as Fred G. Meyer. In the 1920s, Meyer began building his “One-Stop Shopping” stores around the Portland area. Please join us for the encore presentation as Fred Leeson presents the story of Fred Meyer, putting his life and work in context with the stores he built. Portland architects Fred and William Claussen play an important role in the story, as they designed some of Meyer’s first stores, along with several other notable Portland buildings including the Roosevelt Hotel and Laurelhurst School. In addition to his volunteer work with the Bosco-Milligan Foundation/Architectural Heritage Center, Leeson is also the author of the recent biography of Fred G. Meyer, My-Te-Fine Merchant: Fred Meyer’s Retail Revolution (2014). As a special treat, Fred will be offering a FREE copy of his book to the first 60 people that register for this talk.
Thursday
Jun
30
2016
Saturday
Feb
14
2015
Saturday, February 14, 2015 from 11am-1pm
11am-1pm
Veterans For Peace Chapter 72 hosts a Valentines Day Brunch from 11am to 1pm at the Architectural Heritage Center, 701 SE Grand Avenue, in Portland, Oregon, in honor of acclaimed author Christian G. Appy, a professor of history at the University of Massachusetts in Amherst, whose latest book, American Reckoning: The Vietnam War and Our National Identity, was released on February 5, 2015. Appy is the author of two previous books on the Vietnam War, including the oral history, Patriots: The Vietnam War Remembered from All Sides, which won the Massachusetts Book Award for nonfiction. A brunch social will be followed by a talk and discussion with Professor Appy about his new book, which offers “a necessary corrective to our historical memory and our current course.” Attendees may arrive as early as 10am to view the current Architectural Heritage Center exhibit, "Strength, Utility, and Beauty: Architectural Metal in the Gilded Age," at no extra charge. Brunch tickets are available for sliding scale $14–$20 and may be purchased online at vfpbrunch.brownpapertickets.com. A limited number of tickets will be available at the door. For more information about the brunch, call 503-774-9197 or email info@vfpchapter72.org. For more information about Christian G. Appy and his books, visit christianappy.com. Advance praise for American Reckoning: Peter Davis, director of the Oscar-winning documentary Hearts and Minds: “Brilliant, beautiful, and painful…an essential book…[It] brightly illuminates the question we all need to ask ourselves: what is America's place in the world?” Nick Turse, author of the New York Times bestseller Kill Anything That Moves: “A triumph of originality… American Reckoning offers a fresh lens for understanding the United States in the context of its most controversial conflict as well as its 21st century wars.” Marilyn B. Young, author of The Vietnam Wars: “Christian Appy…argues persuasively that we must remember the war and its consequences if we are to come to a full reckoning with the past and finally dispel the myth of American exceptionalism.”