blue sky gallery

Location

122 NW 8th Ave
Portland
,
OR
97209
,
US

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Past Events

Thursday
May
5
2016
Thursday, May 5, 2016 from 6-9pm
6-9pm
Venue:
@
blue sky gallery
Thomas Bilanges: Vis-à-Vies From 2006 to 2007 photographer Thomas Bilanges was commissioned to create 180 portraits of the staff at the Musée Carnavalet in Paris in order to educate the public about the museum’s collection and those who care for it. The artist asked each person he photographed to select a favorite portrait—either painted, drawn, photographed, or sculpted—housed within the institution's walls. He then shot the chosen artworks using similar lighting and perspectives he had employed for their admirers. The resulting diptychs, which were exhibited at the Musée Carnavalet in 2012, are delightfully uncanny, highlighting overlapping expressions and gestures between the two subjects while flattening time and space to masterfully illustrate the deep connection one can feel to a work of art. Thomas Bilanges is a freelance photographer living and working in Paris, France. His work has been shown at the Musée de la Photagraphie in Mougins, the Musée des Années 30 in Boulogne-Billancourt, and in various commercial galleries throughout France. He has also published numerous monographs of his work, including most recently the catalog for Vis-à-Vies in conjunction with the 2012 exhibition at the Musée Carnavalet. This is the first exhibition of Vis-à-Vies in the United States. --- Thomas Bilanges Vis-à-Vies - Andrés Wertheim The Museum's Ghosts - May 5—29, 2016 First Thursday Opening Reception May 5, 6:00–9:00 PM Artist Talk with Andrés Wertheim: Thursday, May 5, 5:00 PM
Thursday, May 5, 2016 from 5-6pm
5-6pm
Venue:
@
blue sky gallery
Artist Talk with Andrés Wertheim: The Museum's Ghosts Thursday, May 5, 5:00 PM “It is assumed that when people go to a museum, they carefully observe the paintings and sculptures and thoroughly read the explanatory panels. But what if the characters portrayed in nearby paintings looked upon visitors while they aren't paying attention, what unusual scenes would we find?” Andrés Wertheim’s The Museum’s Ghosts is a series of large-scale multiple exposures composed within the camera that inventively reimagine the relationships between museum-goers and the art surrounding them. Inside each frame, the seemingly inanimate subjects of various paintings and sculptures come to life, activating the same spaces as their unknowing observers. In this way, Wertheim’s composite images offer an imaginative alternate reality in which the ghosts of these historic institutions may finally come out to play, while also challenging us as viewers to reexamine how we experience art. Andrés Wertheim is a photographer currently based in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Early in his photographic career he studied with Horacio Coppola, and later moved to Germany, where he began to photograph concerts. From 1986 on he traveled around the world documenting various places and people, publishing articles in several magazines and newspapers. Since 2004, Wertheim has photographed for international stock photography agencies in addition to exhibiting internationally. His work is housed in the Teutloff Photo + Video Collection in Bielefeld, Germany, as well as in public and private collections in Argentina, Brazil, Germany, Belgium, Russia, and Canada. --- Thomas Bilanges Vis-à-Vies - Andrés Wertheim The Museum's Ghosts - May 5—29, 2016 First Thursday Opening Reception May 5, 6:00–9:00 PM Artist Talk with Andrés Wertheim: Thursday, May 5, 5:00 PM https://www.facebook.com/events/1703746293212781/
Thursday
Apr
7
2016
Thursday, April 7, 2016 at noon through Sunday, May 1, 2016 at 5pm
noon through Sunday, May 1 at 5pm
Venue:
@
blue sky gallery
"My images aim to be twenty-first century relics with roots in the vernacular past. In both content and execution, their purpose is to chronicle the imperfections and impermanence of daily existence, affirming that at its core, life is disorderly, unpredictable, absurd, sometimes disturbing, yet always interesting, and to paraphrase Gabriel Garcia Márquez, also the best thing ever invented—even as we seem to frequently do our very best to test the limits of this idea to the point of extinction.” When artist Peter B. Leighton was nine years old, he saw the science fiction film The Amazing Colossal Man for the first time. It is an unforgettable Cold War parable, featuring a US soldier who is accidentally exposed to nuclear radiation and subsequently morphs into a 60-foot madman before being destroyed by the US Military. Leighton notes this film’s unmistakeable effect on shaping his worldview of embracing the humor and absurdity of life in spite of its tragedies. This outlook also permeates the artist’s inventive series, Man Lives Through Plutonium Blast. For this body of work, Leighton digitally pieces together analog snapshots to create imaginary vernacular photographs of the twentieth century experience, complete with “monochrome men fallen from grace, ambivalent women standing on the cusp of empowerment and reinvention, and feral, free-range children born to run, all with the enduring threat of an end of the world as they know it circling high overhead.” Peter B. Leighton is an artist currently living and working in Tumbaco, Ecuador. In the 1970s he served as an assistant to photographer Tom Wright, who was a key figure in documenting the emerging rock scenes in 1960s Great Britain and the United States. Since the 1980s, Leighton has focused his attention on digital imaging as a viable process for fine printmaking, while also serving as a corporate e-strategist for Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishers, and operating a fine arts digital imprint, Penny Prints Press, in Austin, Texas. This is Leighton's first exhibition of Man Lives Through Plutonium Blast. First Thursday Opening Reception April 7, 6:00–9:00 PM Artist Talks: Peter B. Leighton: Thursday, April 7, 5:00 PM Amanda Harman: Saturday, April 9, 3:00 PM
Wednesday
Jan
6
2016
Wednesday, January 6, 2016 at noon through Sunday, January 31, 2016 at 5pm
noon through Sunday, January 31 at 5pm
Venue:
@
blue sky gallery
During the month of January, Blue Sky will dedicate both of its galleries to two exhibitions by Portland photographer Jim Lommasson that draw attention to the often unseen casualties of war. Exit Wounds: Soldiers’ Stories–Life after Iraq and Afghanistan and What We Carried: Fragments from the Cradle of Civilization are ongoing photographic collaborations between the artist and individuals affected by the U.S.-led invasions of Iraq and Afghanistan, offering both an American and Iraqi perspective on the war. For Exit Wounds: Soldiers’ Stories–Life after Iraq and Afghanistan, Lommasson has composed evocative environmental portraits of American veterans who have recently returned home from military service. Excerpts from the artist’s interviews with each soldier, as well as smaller snapshots that he or she took while overseas, help to form a more complete picture of each veteran’s experience abroad and subsequent reintegration into everyday life. Lommasson’s dedication to this project comes from his staunch belief that "the soldiers need to tell their stories, and we need to hear them. We must know the true consequences of their–of our–actions." In contrast, What We Carried: Fragments from the Cradle of Civilization reveals the stories of refugees fleeing the Iraq War through the objects they were able to bring with them to the United States. Lommasson photographs these precious items—including family snapshots, an archaeology book, heirloom china dishes, and the Quran—on a white background, asking their owners to write directly within the open spaces left in the prints and elaborate upon each object’s significance. The resulting images are as beautiful as they are heartbreaking, providing viewers with only a small glimpse of what each person has lost while serving as a poignant reminder that, as Jim asserts, "we must take responsibility for the aftermath of the war in Iraq and Afghanistan as well as at home." Jim Lommasson is a freelance photographer and author living in Portland, Oregon, who participated in Blue Sky’s inaugural 1975 group exhibition. This will also be Lommasson’s second solo show at the gallery. His photography has been exhibted extensively at such venues as the Portland Art Museum and Camerawork Gallery in Portland, Oregon, as well as the Arsenal Center for the Arts in Boston. His work is housed in the collections of the Portland Art Museum, the New Orleans Museum of Art, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, and Yale University. Lommasson received the Dorothea Lange–Paul Taylor Prize from the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University for his first book, Shadow Boxers: Sweat, Sacrifice and The Will to Survive in American Boxing Gyms, and in 2009 Oregon State University Press published Oaks Park Pentimento: Portland’s Lost and Found Carousel Art. His most recent book, Exit Wounds: Soldiers’ Stories–Life After Iraq and Afghanistan, was published this year. Lommasson was awarded a 2011 Regional Arts and Culture Council Project Grant for What We Carried as well as a 2012—2016 Oregon Humanities Conversation Project Grant for his public discussion, “Life after War: Photography and Oral Histories of Coming Home.”
Tuesday
Jan
5
2016
Tuesday, January 5, 2016 at noon
noon
Venue:
@
blue sky gallery
During the month of January, Blue Sky will dedicate both of its galleries to two exhibitions by Portland photographer Jim Lommasson that draw attention to the often unseen casualties of war. Exit Wounds: Soldiers’ Stories–Life after Iraq and Afghanistan and What We Carried: Fragments from the Cradle of Civilization are ongoing photographic collaborations between the artist and individuals affected by the U.S.-led invasions of Iraq and Afghanistan, offering both an American and Iraqi perspective on the war. For Exit Wounds: Soldiers’ Stories–Life after Iraq and Afghanistan, Lommasson has composed evocative environmental portraits of American veterans who have recently returned home from military service. Excerpts from the artist’s interviews with each soldier, as well as smaller snapshots that he or she took while overseas, help to form a more complete picture of each veteran’s experience abroad and subsequent reintegration into everyday life. Lommasson’s dedication to this project comes from his staunch belief that "the soldiers need to tell their stories, and we need to hear them. We must know the true consequences of their–of our–actions." In contrast, What We Carried: Fragments from the Cradle of Civilization reveals the stories of refugees fleeing the Iraq War through the objects they were able to bring with them to the United States. Lommasson photographs these precious items—including family snapshots, an archaeology book, heirloom china dishes, and the Quran—on a white background, asking their owners to write directly within the open spaces left in the prints and elaborate upon each object’s significance. The resulting images are as beautiful as they are heartbreaking, providing viewers with only a small glimpse of what each person has lost while serving as a poignant reminder that, as Jim asserts, "we must take responsibility for the aftermath of the war in Iraq and Afghanistan as well as at home." Jim Lommasson is a freelance photographer and author living in Portland, Oregon, who participated in Blue Sky’s inaugural 1975 group exhibition. This will also be Lommasson’s second solo show at the gallery. His photography has been exhibted extensively at such venues as the Portland Art Museum and Camerawork Gallery in Portland, Oregon, as well as the Arsenal Center for the Arts in Boston. His work is housed in the collections of the Portland Art Museum, the New Orleans Museum of Art, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, and Yale University. Lommasson received the Dorothea Lange–Paul Taylor Prize from the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University for his first book, Shadow Boxers: Sweat, Sacrifice and The Will to Survive in American Boxing Gyms, and in 2009 Oregon State University Press published Oaks Park Pentimento: Portland’s Lost and Found Carousel Art. His most recent book, Exit Wounds: Soldiers’ Stories–Life After Iraq and Afghanistan, was published this year. Lommasson was awarded a 2011 Regional Arts and Culture Council Project Grant for What We Carried as well as a 2012—2016 Oregon Humanities Conversation Project Grant for his public discussion, “Life after War: Photography and Oral Histories of Coming Home.”
Wednesday
Dec
2
2015
Wednesday, December 2, 2015 at noon through Sunday, January 3, 2016 at 5pm
noon through Sunday, January 3, 2016 at 5pm
Venue:
@
blue sky gallery
Artist Talk: First Thursday, December 3 at 5pm. Free! In 2012 Pedro David began photographing the 360 square meters that make up his family's home. This project allowed the artist to visually contemplate his immediate surroundings while also exploring his unique place in the world from a philosophical perspective. Each image is shot on David’s 4x5 camera using discontinued Polaroid 55 black-and-white film, then scanned and enlarged, infusing even the most mundane of domestic items with a reverent sense of history and monumentality. Some of the scenes containing what the artist calls “nonsense assemblages” are deliberately constructed by the artist, while others are simply the result of chance. “This is a figurative trip into the depths of my existence, passing through my artistic, political, and philosophical experiences from a cosmic perspective...This is an attempt to build my own particular world, fictional but credible, developed by my instincts and influenced by the history of art and photography, geography, and current events.” Pedro David (b. 1977, Brazil) completed his BA in journalism at the Pontifical Catholic University of Minas Gerais State in Belo Horizonte, Brazil in 2001 and holds a graduate degree in contemporary fine arts from the Escola Guignard, Universidade do Estado de Minas Gerais in Brazil. He has published numerous books, including Underwater Landscape (2008); The Garden (2012); Route Root (2013); and Catharsis Phase (2014). His work is housed in the collections of the Musée du Quai Branly, Paris; the Museu de Arte Moderna de São Paulo, Brazil; the Museu Nacional da República, Brasília, Brazil; and the Minas Gerais State Museum, Belo Horizonte, Brazil. 360 Square Meters was awarded the Marc Ferrez Prize in Photography by the Brazilian Art Foundation (Funarte) in 2012, in addition to a Photoquai Residency from the French Musée du Quai Branly in 2012 and the first Nexo Foto Prize in Spain in 2014.
Wednesday, December 2, 2015 at noon through Sunday, January 3, 2016 at 5pm
noon through Sunday, January 3, 2016 at 5pm
Venue:
@
blue sky gallery
Artist Talk: Friday, December 4, 12:00pm Based on his fond memories of growing up in a farming community in Northern Idaho, Ken Ragsdale’sThe Hundred-Acre Wood is a labor-intensive project that brings together the artist’s expertise in drawing, sculpture, and photography. Each color image begins as a drawing, which Ragsdale then translates into three-dimensional white vellum paper models, all of which are cut out in single pieces, folded, and held together with tabs. As the final step, the artist enlists colored lights to bring these monochromatic cut-outs of homes, farms, logging sites, and Pacific Northwest wilderness to life in front of the camera. In addition to The Hundred-Acre Wood, Blue Sky will also exhibit selections from three of Ragsdale’s previous photographic series, all of which have informed the artist's most recent work on display. “I have attempted to develop a pictorial language, which communicates these ideas of memory, place, tension, and anticipation by connecting a representation of the viewable world to the conjured images of my memory. On one hand, I try to produce an effect of time compressed, obliterating the minutia of life, while on the other, exploiting the physical structure of this minutia, enlarging and expanding it to the point of overwhelming time.” Ken Ragsdale is a Pacific Northwest native currently living and working in Albany, New York. He earned his BFA in painting from the Pacific Northwest College of Art before receiving his MFA from the University of Albany, SUNY. His work has been exhibited in many regional, national, and international venues and he is currently represented by Front Room Gallery in Brooklyn, New York. Ragsdale also serves as a lecturer in the art department at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy, New York.
Thursday
Feb
5
2015
Thursday, February 5, 2015 at noon through Sunday, March 1, 2015 at 5pm
noon through Sunday, March 1 at 5pm
Venue:
@
blue sky gallery
Rebecca Norris Webb My Dakota “Does loss have its own geography?” In 2005, Rebecca Norris Webb began photographing her home state of South Dakota, a place of complexity that she describes as having “more buffalo, pronghorn, coyotes, mule deer, and prairie dogs than people.” A year into the project, her brother died unexpectedly of heart failure. At this point, Webb found herself continuing to photograph while driving on the prairie roads as a way of processing her grief. The resulting exhibition, My Dakota, takes viewers on this elegiac journey, combining luminous color prints of the South Dakota landscape with the artist’s poetry penciled onto the gallery walls. My Dakota will continue in exhibition form from Blue Sky to The Cleveland Museum of Art this summer. Rebecca Norris Webb has published numerous photography books, including Memory City with Alex Webb, and Alex Webb and Rebecca Webb on Street Photography and the Poetic Image. Originally a poet, she often interweaves her text and photographs in her books, most notably with her third book, My Dakota, which features works from this exhibition. Additionally Webb’s work has been shown at the Museum of Fine Art in Boston and Ricco/Maresca Gallery in New York, and is in the collection of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, George Eastman House, and Santa Barbara Museum of Art, among others. Her work has appeared in The New Yorker, The New York Review of Books, and Le Monde Magazine.
Thursday, February 5, 2015 at noon through Sunday, March 1, 2015 at 5pm
noon through Sunday, March 1 at 5pm
Venue:
@
blue sky gallery
Monika Merva Origins of Emotions Origins of Emotions is a series by photographer Monika Merva that presents the quiet moments of family life, bringing into focus small details that often evoke memories heavy with emotion. Each deliberately composed color image exists as a physical record of an instance now past, as the artist hopes to push viewers towards a more mindful observation of the present and our place within the world around us. "In contemplating this series, I am confronted with the uneasy sense that this body of work is as much about beginnings as it is about endings, life and death. It is about securing my own memories and capturing an image of the people and moments that have given shape to my life. Equally, it is about the awareness of how an image marks the last vestige of that moment in time: a memory captured and a moment disintegrated at the same utterance." Monika Merva received her BA in philosophy from Northeastern University and completed her MFA in photography from Savannah College of Art and Design. Her photographs have been featured in The New Yorker and New York Times Magazine, and her work is in the permanent collections of the Bibliothèque nationale de France, Brooklyn Museum, George Eastman House, Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, and Johnson & Johnson Corporate Art Collection. Kehrer Verlag published her first monograph, The City of Children, in May 2011. This is her first exhibition of Origins of Emotions in the United States. Merva currently lives and works in Brooklyn, New York.
Wednesday
Jan
7
2015
Wednesday, January 7, 2015 at noon through Sunday, February 1, 2015 at 5pm
noon through Sunday, February 1 at 5pm
Venue:
@
blue sky gallery
At seven years old, photojournalist Diana Markosian moved from Moscow to California with her mother and brother. Her father was left behind. Markosian’s early memories of her father were limited, but as she adjusted to her new life in the United States, she never lost hope that she would see him again. In 2013, after a separation of more than 15 years, Markosian traveled to Armenia to reconnect with her estranged parent. She began photographing as they became re-acquainted. Later, she allowed him to turn the camera on her as well. The end result is Markosian’s moving series, Inventing My Father, which combines black-and-white and color prints by the artist and her father and tells an affecting story of reconciliation and forgiveness in spite of innumerable obstacles. “I knocked on the door of a stranger. I've traveled halfway around the world to meet him. My father. I have few childhood memories of him. In one, we are dancing together in our tiny apartment in Moscow. In another, he is leaving. My father would disappear for months at a time. Then, unexpectedly, he would show up. At seven years old, I was taken away from him, far away. One morning, my mom woke me and my brother up to say we were going on a trip. We never said goodbye to my father. And the next day, we arrived in our new home in California. For my mom, the solution to forget him was simple. She cut his image out of every photograph in our family album. But those holes made it harder for me to forget him. I often wondered what it would have been like to have a father. I still do.”