Blue Sky Gallery

Location

122 NW 8th Ave
Portland
,
OR
97209
,
US

Website

Description

Free admission!

Future Events

Thursday
May
4
2017
Thursday, May 4, 2017 at noon through Sunday, May 28, 2017 at 5pm
noon through Sunday, May 28 at 5pm
Venue:
@
Blue Sky Gallery
Seiya Bowen Nadachi Aleksey Kondratyev Ice Fishers May 4–28, 2017 First Thursday Opening Reception May 4, 6:00–9:00 PM Artist talk with Seiya Bowen: Thursday, May 4, 5:00 PM Artist talk with Aleksey Kondratyev: Saturday, May 6, 3:00 PM All Blue Sky events and programs are free and open to the public. Aleksey Kondratyev’s Ice Fishers is a visual study of makeshift shelters used by Kazakh fishers as they fish along the frozen Ishim River. North-Central Kazakhstan is one of the coldest populated regions on Earth, yet many fishermen use nothing more than trash bags and salvaged plastic to protect themselves from subzero temperatures and biting winds. Despite this harsh environment, Kondratyev’s photographs reveal the beauty of these improvised structures, drawing attention to the material and shape of each functional sculpture as it floats within an endless expanse of white. Aleksey Kondratyev (b.1993 in Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan) works between Detroit, Michigan and Central Asia. In 2015 he completed a fellowship at Fabrica, a communication research center based in Treviso, Italy, allowing him to travel throughout Central Asia to complete his Formations series. He is also the director and co-founder of Stand Quarterly. an international contemporary art journal. This is his first solo exhibition of Ice Fishers.
Thursday, May 4, 2017 at noon through Sunday, May 28, 2017 at 5pm
noon through Sunday, May 28 at 5pm
Venue:
@
Blue Sky Gallery
Seiya Bowen Nadachi Aleksey Kondratyev Ice Fishers May 4–28, 2017 First Thursday Opening Reception May 4, 6:00–9:00 PM Artist talk with Seiya Bowen: Thursday, May 4, 5:00 PM Artist talk with Aleksey Kondratyev: Saturday, May 6, 3:00 PM All Blue Sky events and programs are free and open to the public. “Each summer for over a decade, I returned to my childhood home in Japan. With every visit, the town faded away, slowly being replaced by a new infrastructure of bullet trains and fast-speed freeways.” In Nadachi, Seiya Bowen examines the socio-economic transformation of rural Japan by focusing his lens on the changes affecting the small town where his grandparents once lived. With increased urban development, many are abandoning Japan’s countryside for economic opportunities available in its metropolitan centers, leaving the older residents behind. Bowen’s quiet color photographs compose an intimate portrait of Nadachi alongside the striking visual evidence of the encroaching transportation systems moving people toward the larger cities. In this way, Bowen skillfully illustrates how these two worlds uncomfortably coexist within the same landscape, while also coming to terms with the personal loss of a particular way of life. Seiya Bowen is a photographer currently based in Albuquerque, New Mexico. He graduated from the University of New Mexico with a BFA in 2014 and has since exhibited both nationally and internationally at venues such as SITE Santa Fe and the Center for Fine Art Photography in Fort Collins, Colorado. Bowen’s photography has been featured in Fraction Magazine, PDN and Aint-Bad Magazine, among other publications. This is his first solo exhibition of Nadachi.

Past Events

Thursday
May
4
2017
Thursday, May 4, 2017 at noon through Sunday, May 28, 2017 at 5pm
noon through Sunday, May 28 at 5pm
Venue:
@
Blue Sky Gallery
Seiya Bowen Nadachi Aleksey Kondratyev Ice Fishers May 4–28, 2017 First Thursday Opening Reception May 4, 6:00–9:00 PM Artist talk with Seiya Bowen: Thursday, May 4, 5:00 PM Artist talk with Aleksey Kondratyev: Saturday, May 6, 3:00 PM All Blue Sky events and programs are free and open to the public. Aleksey Kondratyev’s Ice Fishers is a visual study of makeshift shelters used by Kazakh fishers as they fish along the frozen Ishim River. North-Central Kazakhstan is one of the coldest populated regions on Earth, yet many fishermen use nothing more than trash bags and salvaged plastic to protect themselves from subzero temperatures and biting winds. Despite this harsh environment, Kondratyev’s photographs reveal the beauty of these improvised structures, drawing attention to the material and shape of each functional sculpture as it floats within an endless expanse of white. Aleksey Kondratyev (b.1993 in Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan) works between Detroit, Michigan and Central Asia. In 2015 he completed a fellowship at Fabrica, a communication research center based in Treviso, Italy, allowing him to travel throughout Central Asia to complete his Formations series. He is also the director and co-founder of Stand Quarterly. an international contemporary art journal. This is his first solo exhibition of Ice Fishers.
Thursday, May 4, 2017 at noon through Sunday, May 28, 2017 at 5pm
noon through Sunday, May 28 at 5pm
Venue:
@
Blue Sky Gallery
Seiya Bowen Nadachi Aleksey Kondratyev Ice Fishers May 4–28, 2017 First Thursday Opening Reception May 4, 6:00–9:00 PM Artist talk with Seiya Bowen: Thursday, May 4, 5:00 PM Artist talk with Aleksey Kondratyev: Saturday, May 6, 3:00 PM All Blue Sky events and programs are free and open to the public. “Each summer for over a decade, I returned to my childhood home in Japan. With every visit, the town faded away, slowly being replaced by a new infrastructure of bullet trains and fast-speed freeways.” In Nadachi, Seiya Bowen examines the socio-economic transformation of rural Japan by focusing his lens on the changes affecting the small town where his grandparents once lived. With increased urban development, many are abandoning Japan’s countryside for economic opportunities available in its metropolitan centers, leaving the older residents behind. Bowen’s quiet color photographs compose an intimate portrait of Nadachi alongside the striking visual evidence of the encroaching transportation systems moving people toward the larger cities. In this way, Bowen skillfully illustrates how these two worlds uncomfortably coexist within the same landscape, while also coming to terms with the personal loss of a particular way of life. Seiya Bowen is a photographer currently based in Albuquerque, New Mexico. He graduated from the University of New Mexico with a BFA in 2014 and has since exhibited both nationally and internationally at venues such as SITE Santa Fe and the Center for Fine Art Photography in Fort Collins, Colorado. Bowen’s photography has been featured in Fraction Magazine, PDN and Aint-Bad Magazine, among other publications. This is his first solo exhibition of Nadachi.
Thursday
Apr
6
2017
Thursday, April 6, 2017 at noon through Sunday, April 30, 2017 at 5pm
noon through Sunday, April 30 at 5pm
Venue:
@
Blue Sky Gallery
2016 Critical Mass Solo Exhibition Award in collaboration with Photolucida: Ervin A. Johnson #InHonor Cristián Ureta Volviendo a la Tierra April 6–30, 2017 First Thursday Opening Reception April 6, 6:00–9:00 PM Artist Talk by Cristián Ureta with special Drawers artist talk by Stefan Lesueur: Friday, April 7, 12:00 PM Artist Ervin A. Johnson in conversation with Portland curator Ashley Stull Meyers: Saturday, April 8, 3:00 PM All Blue Sky events and programs are free and open to the public. Ervin A. Johnson “I began #InHonor as a personal response to the killings of Black people across America. To be completely honest the work was born out of guilt. All of my friends had rallied up in arms to march for Trayvon Martin and Eric Garner. I, on the other hand, was nowhere to be found...What real change would come of my presence as a young gay black man at a march in which half of my people don’t accept or acknowledge me? Still, though, I felt moved to do something.” #InHonor is an ongoing series of photo-based mixed media portraits that honor Blackness in its many forms, while also acknowledging the violence and destruction taking place in America in the form of police brutality. After printing each portrait he has composed, Johnson uses various solvents to remove pigments from the print’s surface. He then reintroduces color to the image using acrylic paints and inks to further abstract the subject's skin tone and facial features, challenging viewers to rethink preconceived notions of what skin color signifies within our society. Each larger-than-life portrait is an homage to each individual pictured, yet the symbolic violence of Johnson’s material interventions into each photograph cannot be ignored. The artist plans to continue his work on #InHonor for as long as lives are lost due to racism and police brutality. Blue Sky is pleased to present #InHonor as the 2016 Critical Mass Solo Exhibition Award in conjunction with Photolucida. Ervin A. Johnson was born and raised in Chicago, Illinois. He graduated from the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign with a bachelor's degree in rhetoric and subsequently completed his second bachelor's degree at Columbia College Chicago in photography. Most recently, he graduated with his MFA in photography from Savannah College of Art and Design in Georgia and has exhibited work from his #InHonor series at Arnika Dawkins Gallery in Atlanta, Georgia.
Thursday, April 6, 2017 at noon through Sunday, April 30, 2017 at 5pm
noon through Sunday, April 30 at 5pm
Venue:
@
Blue Sky Gallery
2016 Critical Mass Solo Exhibition Award in collaboration with Photolucida: Ervin A. Johnson #InHonor Cristián Ureta Volviendo a la Tierra April 6–30, 2017 First Thursday Opening Reception April 6, 6:00–9:00 PM Artist Talk by Cristián Ureta with special Drawers artist talk by Stefan Lesueur: Friday, April 7, 12:00 PM Artist Ervin A. Johnson in conversation with Portland curator Ashley Stull Meyers: Saturday, April 8, 3:00 PM All Blue Sky events and programs are free and open to the public. “This is the end of a hundred years' history of a mining camp that became a small city of 25, 000 people. This is the last part of a story of a death foretold, related to an important part of the development of my country.” From 2003 to 2005 Cristián Ureta photographed the Chilean mining town of Chuquicamata. Environmental hazards and the expansion of the nearby copper mine led to its closure in 2007, forcing its inhabitants to relocate to the nearby city of Calama. Ureta’s work is a visual study of what was left behind, with his measured black-and-white images unflinchingly documenting the largely unpopulated streets, houses, and public spaces harshly lit by the desert sun. Volviendo a la Tierra eloquently bears witness to the memory of a town and its people before it returns to the earth, ultimately buried by the industry that created it. Cristian Ureta, born in Buenos Aires, Argentina in 1973, currently lives and works in Santiago, Chile. He studied advertising at the University of the Pacific in Santiago de Chile and is currently a candidate for a master's degree in image studies at the Universidad Alberto Hurtado. A self-taught photographer, Ureta began working in the medium in 1997 and has subsequently won several nation and international prizes and scholarships, and has exhibited extensively throughout Chile and at multiple international photography festivals. In 2012 he published the monograph VIVEN: Periplo por Poetas de Chile, followed by Volviendo a la Tierra in 2012. This is the first solo exhibition of Volviendo a la Tierra in the United States.
Thursday
Mar
2
2017
Thursday, March 2, 2017 at noon through Sunday, April 2, 2017 at 5pm
noon through Sunday, April 2 at 5pm
Venue:
@
Blue Sky Gallery
Tara Sellios Testimony Lauren Semivan Observatory March 2–April 2, 2017 First Thursday Opening Reception March 2, 6:00–9:00 PM Artist Talks: Lauren Semivan: Thursday, March 2, 5:00 PM Tara Sellios: Friday, March 3, 12:00 PM All Blue Sky events and programs are free and open to the public. "Death has always possessed a significant presence within the history of art, ranging from altarpieces to the work of the Dutch still life painters. Manifesting melancholic themes with beauty and precision, as these artists did, results in an image that is seductive, forcing the viewer to look, despite its apparent grotesque and morbid nature. Through these images, I aspire to make apparent the restlessness of a life that is knowingly so temporary and vulnerable.” Inspired by Last Judgement paintings of the Baroque era, Tara Sellios’ Testimony is a visual rumination upon the fragility, impermanence, and carnality of life. Her process is meticulous and deliberate, with each tableaux beginning as a detailed watercolor sketch. Sellios then translates each painting into sculpture, carefully placing rehydrated insect specimens and animal skeletons into intriguing configurations that she subsequently photographs with an 8x10 view camera. The resulting larger-than-life color photographic prints, which will be on view alongside selected watercolors, are meant to disrupt preconceived notions of death while also offering a space for contemplating our mortality. Tara Sellios (b. 1987) is an artist living and working in Boston, Massachusetts. She holds a BFA in Photography from The Art Institute of Boston and has exhibited extensively regionally and nationally. Her work has been featured in Photograph magazine, the Boston Globe, and on the Lenscratch photography blog. Blue Sky is honored to host Sellios’ first solo show on the West Coast.
Thursday, March 2, 2017 at noon through Sunday, April 2, 2017 at 9pm
noon through Sunday, April 2 at 9pm
Venue:
@
Blue Sky Gallery
Tara Sellios Testimony Lauren Semivan Observatory March 2–April 2, 2017 First Thursday Opening Reception March 2, 6:00–9:00 PM Artist Talks: Lauren Semivan: Thursday, March 2, 5:00 PM Tara Sellios: Friday, March 3, 12:00 PM All Blue Sky events and programs are free and open to the public. “Within each image, ghosts of previous drawings create a sense of time suspended, evoking gesture, atmosphere and memory. Photographs allow me to access the extraordinary, to keep a record of dreams, and to employ the unforeseen.” To create the large format black-and-white photographs that comprise Observatory, Lauren Semivan brings together the visual languages of drawing, still life painting, and performance to express her dreamlike interior narratives on film. Using charcoal and graphite, Semivan makes gestural marks on large backdrops, setting the emotional tone for each image and leaving traces of her presence. When Semivan does appear in the front of her 8x10 view camera, she often seems caught in a dance, her identity obscured within the image’s painterly abstraction. Strategically placed objects also populate the staged environment, adding additional layers for the eye to peruse and inviting us into the depths of the artist’s inner world. Lauren Semivan (b. 1981) is an artist living and working in Detroit, Michigan. She received a BA in studio art from Lawrence University in Appleton, Wisconsin, and an MFA in photography from Cranbrook Academy of Art. Her work has been exhibited nationally and internationally at many galleries and museums and she has taught photography at the College for Creative Studies, The Ohio State University, Virginia Commonwealth University, and Wayne State University. Semivan has received numerous awards for her work including Photolucida Critical Mass Top 50 and The Griffin Museum of Photography’s Griffin Award. Her work has appeared in The New Yorker, Artforum, and Photograph magazines and is part of the permanent collections at the Nelson Atkins Museum of Art, Cranbrook Art Museum, The Wriston Art Galleries at Lawrence University, and The Elton John Collection. She is represented by Benrubi Gallery in New York, and David Klein Gallery in Detroit, Michigan.
Friday
Mar
25
2016
Friday, March 25, 2016 at 2pm
2pm
Venue:
@
Blue Sky Gallery
2015 Critical Mass Solo Show Award Amanda Harman Garden Stories, Hidden Labours Amanda Harman first experienced the gardens of Tyntesfield, a country house and estate in Bristol that is now part of England’s National Trust, as a volunteer working in the cut flower garden. After spending a year assisting with maintaining the grounds, Harman returned with her camera to tell the story of this historic site. Although decidedly understated in tone, the artist's large color prints masterfully reveal the wondrous microcosms of the greenhouses and outbuildings, whose orderly forms would cease to exist without the many dedicated hours of toil behind-the-scenes. “By uncovering the small signs of the day to day—the tending of plants, their protection from insects, disease and weather; the nurturing of seedlings and tender plants in the glasshouses, the harvesting, drying and storing of crops, and the gathering of flowers to be arranged and placed in the house—these observations seek to embody the gardener’s labours and to reveal the unseen stories of the gardens, and those who tend them.” Garden Stories is the 2015 Critical Mass Solo Exhibition Award presented in collaboration with Photolucida. Amanda Harman is a photographer based in Bristol, UK. She studied photography at West Surrey College of Art and Design and London College of Communication and has worked on a range of commissions, residencies, and projects for galleries, museums, charities, and commercial clients since 1985. Harman's work has been exhibited widely in the UK and in Europe, and is held in a number of collections, including the Victoria and Albert Museum in London and the National Media Museum in Bradford. She was selected for Portrait Salon 13 and won the Professional Still Life Category of the 2014 Sony World Photography Awards, in addition to being included in the Critical Mass Top 50 in 2015. She currently is an Associate Lecturer in Photography at the University of the West of England. First Thursday Opening Reception April 7, 6:00–9:00 PM Artist Talks: Peter B. Leighton: Thursday, April 7, 5:00 PM Amanda Harman: Saturday, April 9, 3:00 PM
Wednesday
Jan
7
2015
Wednesday, January 7, 2015 at noon through Sunday, February 1, 2015 at 2pm
noon through Sunday, February 1 at 2pm
Venue:
@
Blue Sky Gallery
In his series, Inshallah, which means “God-willing” in Arabic, photographer Dima Gavrysh explores the repercussions of the Soviet and American occupations of Afghanistan. The visually stunning black-and-white images that make up this body of work were all captured while the photographer was embedded in the US army. Each print emits a haunting, dream-like quality that highlights the contradictions inherent to war, a condition often suffused with an idealized patriotism that frequently belies the real violence and devastation faced by the civilians and soldiers on the ground. “I create a dark fairytale filled with my fears and dreams, based on my fascination with the army’s strength and order, set on the front lines of what has become America’s longest running war in history. Mesmerized by the complexity of the Afghan chaos, I strive to better comprehend my personal relationship to these wars: two empires, two mentalities, same battlefield, twelve years apart.”