Blue Sky Gallery

Location

122 NW 8th Ave
Portland
,
OR
97209
,
US

Website

Description

Free admission!

Future Events

Thursday
Sep
6
2018
Thursday, September 6, 2018 at noon through Sunday, September 30, 2018 at 5pm
noon through Sunday, September 30 at 5pm
Venue:
@
Blue Sky Gallery
“This series borrows from personal experience, and the visual language of the everyday in order to create a fictional account that mirrors my reality. Photographs are reductions, distillations, half-truths and complete fabrications. They can only describe the surface of things, while I am interested in the intangible – memory and emotional resonance.” Matt Eich photographed I Love You, I’m Leaving during a difficult time in his family’s life: his parents separated after 33 years of marriage, while his siblings were experiencing drastic changes in their personal lives and he and his wife and two children moved to a new city. This emotionally-charged black-and-white series is not strictly memoir, but exists somewhere in-between documentary and fiction. For Eich, the title reflects a constant in his life, which he calls “the rhythm of my peripatetic life.” He notes that “it holds true when I leave my family to photograph strangers, and leave strangers to return home.” Matt Eich (b. 1986) studied photojournalism at Ohio University and holds an MFA in Photography from Hartford Art School’s International Limited-Residency Program. He is a Professional Lecturer of Photography at The George Washington University and lives in Charlottesville, Virginia with his wife and two daughters. Matt’s work has been widely exhibited and received numerous grants and recognitions, including PDN’s 30 Emerging Photographers to Watch, the Joop Swart Masterclass, an Aaron Siskind Fellowship, and two Getty Images Grants for Editorial Photography. Matt’s prints are held in the permanent collections of The Portland Art Museum, the Museum of Fine Arts Houston, The New York Public Library, Chrysler Museum of Art and others. This is Eich’s second solo show at Blue Sky.
Thursday, September 6, 2018 at noon through Sunday, September 30, 2018 at 5pm
noon through Sunday, September 30 at 5pm
Venue:
@
Blue Sky Gallery
Touch is an exhibition featuring over 70 prints from the photography collection of Blue Sky co-founder and photographer Christopher Rauschenberg. The show was inspired by a particular image: Charles Harbutt’s 1961 photograph of a blind boy delicately touching a beam of light (above). This led Rauschenberg to bring together the many other works in his collection that visually capture this poignant human sensory experience in its myriad forms. Touch features photographs by the following artists: Thomas Alleman, Catherine Angel, Talya C. Arbisser, Eugene Atget, Rich Bergeman, Cecilia Berkovic, Skyra Beveridge, Richard Brown, Tom Champion, Jamila Clarke, Vernoll Coleman, Celeste Cottingham, Paul Dahlquist, Arstide Economopoulos, Sidney Felsen, Michelle Frankfurter, Mary Frey, Patricia Galagan, Dorothy Glenn, Alison Grippo, M Bruce Hall, Anita Hamremoen, Charles Harbutt, Phil Harris, Craig Hickman, Ann Hughes, Birney Imes III, Gwynne Johnson, Sara Kirschenbaum, Les Krims, Justine Kurland, Dorthea Lange, Robert Langham, Zun Lee, Catherine Leuthold, Holly Lynton, Chema Madoz, Heather McClintock, July Mihaly, Jennifer Lynn Morse, Zanele Muholi, David Pace, Gordon Parks, Keri Pickett, Ann Ploeger, Gus Powell, Romualdas Požerskis, Jana Romanova, Irina Rozovsky, Nadia Sablin, Kris Sanford, Dona Schwartz, Joshua Smith, Jan Sonnenmair, Larry Sultan, Chip Thomas, Paul Trevor, and Carol Yarrow. In addition to the work by the above artists, during the month of September the Blue Sky community is invited to submit their own Touch photographs via Instagram using the hashtag #touchbluesky. Rauschenberg will print his favorite submissions and add them to the exhibition during the run of the show. Christopher Rauschenberg received his BA from The Evergreen State College in Olympia, Washington. His work has been exhibited at the Griffin Museum of Photography in Winchester, MA, the Chicago Cultural Center, the International Center of Photography in New York, and the George Eastman House in Rochester, NY, among many other major institutions. An exceptionally active leader in the Northwest arts community, he taught at Marylhurst College in Lake Oswego, Oregon for many years and co-founded Nine Gallery here in Blue Sky and photography nonprofit Photolucida, in addition to co-founding Blue Sky Gallery in 1975.
Saturday
Sep
29
2018
Saturday, September 29, 2018 from 3-4pm
3-4pm
Venue:
@
Blue Sky Gallery
Touch is an exhibition featuring over 70 prints from the photography collection of Blue Sky co-founder and photographer Christopher Rauschenberg. The show was inspired by a particular image: Charles Harbutt’s 1961 photograph of a blind boy delicately touching a beam of light (above). This led Rauschenberg to bring together the many other works in his collection that visually capture this poignant human sensory experience in its myriad forms. Touch features photographs by the following artists: Thomas Alleman, Catherine Angel, Talya C. Arbisser, Eugene Atget, Rich Bergeman, Cecilia Berkovic, Skyra Beveridge, Richard Brown, Tom Champion, Jamila Clarke, Vernoll Coleman, Celeste Cottingham, Paul Dahlquist, Arstide Economopoulos, Sidney Felsen, Michelle Frankfurter, Mary Frey, Patricia Galagan, Dorothy Glenn, Alison Grippo, M Bruce Hall, Anita Hamremoen, Charles Harbutt, Phil Harris, Craig Hickman, Ann Hughes, Birney Imes III, Gwynne Johnson, Sara Kirschenbaum, Les Krims, Justine Kurland, Dorthea Lange, Robert Langham, Zun Lee, Catherine Leuthold, Holly Lynton, Chema Madoz, Heather McClintock, July Mihaly, Jennifer Lynn Morse, Zanele Muholi, David Pace, Gordon Parks, Keri Pickett, Ann Ploeger, Gus Powell, Romualdas Požerskis, Jana Romanova, Irina Rozovsky, Nadia Sablin, Kris Sanford, Dona Schwartz, Joshua Smith, Jan Sonnenmair, Larry Sultan, Chip Thomas, Paul Trevor, and Carol Yarrow. In addition to the work by the above artists, during the month of September the Blue Sky community is invited to submit their own Touch photographs via Instagram using the hashtag #touchbluesky. Rauschenberg will print his favorite submissions and add them to the exhibition during the run of the show. Christopher Rauschenberg received his BA from The Evergreen State College in Olympia, Washington. His work has been exhibited at the Griffin Museum of Photography in Winchester, MA, the Chicago Cultural Center, the International Center of Photography in New York, and the George Eastman House in Rochester, NY, among many other major institutions. An exceptionally active leader in the Northwest arts community, he taught at Marylhurst College in Lake Oswego, Oregon for many years and co-founded Nine Gallery here in Blue Sky and photography nonprofit Photolucida, in addition to co-founding Blue Sky Gallery in 1975.

Past Events

Saturday
Sep
8
2018
Saturday, September 8, 2018 from 3-4pm
3-4pm
Venue:
@
Blue Sky Gallery
“This series borrows from personal experience, and the visual language of the everyday in order to create a fictional account that mirrors my reality. Photographs are reductions, distillations, half-truths and complete fabrications. They can only describe the surface of things, while I am interested in the intangible – memory and emotional resonance.” Matt Eich photographed I Love You, I’m Leaving during a difficult time in his family’s life: his parents separated after 33 years of marriage, while his siblings were experiencing drastic changes in their personal lives and he and his wife and two children moved to a new city. This emotionally-charged black-and-white series is not strictly memoir, but exists somewhere in-between documentary and fiction. For Eich, the title reflects a constant in his life, which he calls “the rhythm of my peripatetic life.” He notes that “it holds true when I leave my family to photograph strangers, and leave strangers to return home.” Matt Eich (b. 1986) studied photojournalism at Ohio University and holds an MFA in Photography from Hartford Art School’s International Limited-Residency Program. He is a Professional Lecturer of Photography at The George Washington University and lives in Charlottesville, Virginia with his wife and two daughters. Matt’s work has been widely exhibited and received numerous grants and recognitions, including PDN’s 30 Emerging Photographers to Watch, the Joop Swart Masterclass, an Aaron Siskind Fellowship, and two Getty Images Grants for Editorial Photography. Matt’s prints are held in the permanent collections of The Portland Art Museum, the Museum of Fine Arts Houston, The New York Public Library, Chrysler Museum of Art and others. This is Eich’s second solo show at Blue Sky.
Thursday
Sep
6
2018
Thursday, September 6, 2018 at noon through Sunday, September 30, 2018 at 5pm
noon through Sunday, September 30 at 5pm
Venue:
@
Blue Sky Gallery
“This series borrows from personal experience, and the visual language of the everyday in order to create a fictional account that mirrors my reality. Photographs are reductions, distillations, half-truths and complete fabrications. They can only describe the surface of things, while I am interested in the intangible – memory and emotional resonance.” Matt Eich photographed I Love You, I’m Leaving during a difficult time in his family’s life: his parents separated after 33 years of marriage, while his siblings were experiencing drastic changes in their personal lives and he and his wife and two children moved to a new city. This emotionally-charged black-and-white series is not strictly memoir, but exists somewhere in-between documentary and fiction. For Eich, the title reflects a constant in his life, which he calls “the rhythm of my peripatetic life.” He notes that “it holds true when I leave my family to photograph strangers, and leave strangers to return home.” Matt Eich (b. 1986) studied photojournalism at Ohio University and holds an MFA in Photography from Hartford Art School’s International Limited-Residency Program. He is a Professional Lecturer of Photography at The George Washington University and lives in Charlottesville, Virginia with his wife and two daughters. Matt’s work has been widely exhibited and received numerous grants and recognitions, including PDN’s 30 Emerging Photographers to Watch, the Joop Swart Masterclass, an Aaron Siskind Fellowship, and two Getty Images Grants for Editorial Photography. Matt’s prints are held in the permanent collections of The Portland Art Museum, the Museum of Fine Arts Houston, The New York Public Library, Chrysler Museum of Art and others. This is Eich’s second solo show at Blue Sky.
Thursday, September 6, 2018 at noon through Sunday, September 30, 2018 at 5pm
noon through Sunday, September 30 at 5pm
Venue:
@
Blue Sky Gallery
Touch is an exhibition featuring over 70 prints from the photography collection of Blue Sky co-founder and photographer Christopher Rauschenberg. The show was inspired by a particular image: Charles Harbutt’s 1961 photograph of a blind boy delicately touching a beam of light (above). This led Rauschenberg to bring together the many other works in his collection that visually capture this poignant human sensory experience in its myriad forms. Touch features photographs by the following artists: Thomas Alleman, Catherine Angel, Talya C. Arbisser, Eugene Atget, Rich Bergeman, Cecilia Berkovic, Skyra Beveridge, Richard Brown, Tom Champion, Jamila Clarke, Vernoll Coleman, Celeste Cottingham, Paul Dahlquist, Arstide Economopoulos, Sidney Felsen, Michelle Frankfurter, Mary Frey, Patricia Galagan, Dorothy Glenn, Alison Grippo, M Bruce Hall, Anita Hamremoen, Charles Harbutt, Phil Harris, Craig Hickman, Ann Hughes, Birney Imes III, Gwynne Johnson, Sara Kirschenbaum, Les Krims, Justine Kurland, Dorthea Lange, Robert Langham, Zun Lee, Catherine Leuthold, Holly Lynton, Chema Madoz, Heather McClintock, July Mihaly, Jennifer Lynn Morse, Zanele Muholi, David Pace, Gordon Parks, Keri Pickett, Ann Ploeger, Gus Powell, Romualdas Požerskis, Jana Romanova, Irina Rozovsky, Nadia Sablin, Kris Sanford, Dona Schwartz, Joshua Smith, Jan Sonnenmair, Larry Sultan, Chip Thomas, Paul Trevor, and Carol Yarrow. In addition to the work by the above artists, during the month of September the Blue Sky community is invited to submit their own Touch photographs via Instagram using the hashtag #touchbluesky. Rauschenberg will print his favorite submissions and add them to the exhibition during the run of the show. Christopher Rauschenberg received his BA from The Evergreen State College in Olympia, Washington. His work has been exhibited at the Griffin Museum of Photography in Winchester, MA, the Chicago Cultural Center, the International Center of Photography in New York, and the George Eastman House in Rochester, NY, among many other major institutions. An exceptionally active leader in the Northwest arts community, he taught at Marylhurst College in Lake Oswego, Oregon for many years and co-founded Nine Gallery here in Blue Sky and photography nonprofit Photolucida, in addition to co-founding Blue Sky Gallery in 1975.
Thursday
Aug
2
2018
Thursday, August 2, 2018 from 5-6pm
5-6pm
Venue:
@
Blue Sky Gallery
Come join us as Julie Anand discusses her joint exhibition with Damon Sauer. In their photography series Ground Truth, Julie Anand and Damon Sauer investigate our relationship to the vast networks of information encircling the globe by photographing what remains of the Corona project. This surveillance initiative began in the mid-1960s by the CIA and US Air Force and involved using satellites to take aerial photographs of the Soviet Union and China. The cameras on these satellites were calibrated with concrete crosses 60 feet in diameter, which provided a reference for scale and ensured images were in focus. Approximately 256 of these markers were placed on a 16-square-mile grid in Arizona, spaced a mile apart. Long after Corona’s end and its declassification in 1995, around 100 remain, which Anand and Sauer spent three years photographing. In their images, each concrete cross is overpowered by an expansive sky, onto which the artists map the paths of specific satellites present at the moment each photograph was taken. For the Anand and Sauer, “these markers of space have become markers of time, representing a poignant moment in geopolitical and technologic social history.” Julie Anand and Damon Sauer are artists and educators based in Phoenix, Arizona. They use an interdisciplinary approach to lens-based media to interrogate boundaries and explore the body as a site of perception. Julie Anand is currently Associate Professor in the School of Art at Arizona State University and Damon Sauer serves as an Assistant Professor at the Art Institute of Pittsburgh—Online Division. Both received their MFA degrees in Photography from the University of New Mexico and began collaborating with each other in 2005.
Thursday, August 2, 2018 at noon through Sunday, September 2, 2018 at 5pm
noon through Sunday, September 2 at 5pm
Venue:
@
Blue Sky Gallery
In their photography series Ground Truth, Julie Anand and Damon Sauer investigate our relationship to the vast networks of information encircling the globe by photographing what remains of the Corona project. This surveillance initiative began in the mid-1960s by the CIA and US Air Force and involved using satellites to take aerial photographs of the Soviet Union and China. The cameras on these satellites were calibrated with concrete crosses 60 feet in diameter, which provided a reference for scale and ensured images were in focus. Approximately 256 of these markers were placed on a 16-square-mile grid in Arizona, spaced a mile apart. Long after Corona’s end and its declassification in 1995, around 100 remain, which Anand and Sauer spent three years photographing. In their images, each concrete cross is overpowered by an expansive sky, onto which the artists map the paths of specific satellites present at the moment each photograph was taken. For the Anand and Sauer, “these markers of space have become markers of time, representing a poignant moment in geopolitical and technologic social history.” Julie Anand and Damon Sauer are artists and educators based in Phoenix, Arizona. They use an interdisciplinary approach to lens-based media to interrogate boundaries and explore the body as a site of perception. Julie Anand is currently Associate Professor in the School of Art at Arizona State University and Damon Sauer serves as an Assistant Professor at the Art Institute of Pittsburgh—Online Division. Both received their MFA degrees in Photography from the University of New Mexico and began collaborating with each other in 2005.
Thursday, August 2, 2018 at noon through Sunday, September 2, 2018 at 5pm
noon through Sunday, September 2 at 5pm
Venue:
@
Blue Sky Gallery
Light: On the South Side is a selection of vintage gelatin silver prints taken by the late American photographer Michael Abramson. These dynamic black-and-white photographs taken in the mid-1970s showcase Black nightclubs throughout Chicago’s South Side, where, as a white photographer, Abramson was an anomaly. The series led the artist to win a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts in 1978 and ultimately launched his career as a photojournalist. Eventually the project resulted in the monograph Light: On the South Side published by Numero Group in 2009, which included a Grammy-nominated album featuring Chicago blues as heard in the clubs from the stage and the jukebox. In 2015, CityFiles Press published Gotta Go Gotta Flow, pairing Abramson's South Side photos with new work by the acclaimed poet Patricia Smith. Michael L. Abramson (1948-2011), graduated with a Master of Photography from the Illinois Institute of Technology in Chicago in 1977. His work was regularly featured in Time, New York Times, Newsweek, People, Forbes, Harpers, Wall Street Journal and other national and international magazines. His work was exhibited frequently since 1978, including a solo show at Museum of Contemporary Photography, Chicago, in 2014 and in the same year the group show on American Photography since 1950 at Madison Museum of Contemporary Arts (US). His work is housed in the collections of the Smithsonian, the Art Institute of Chicago, the Chicago History Museum, the Milwaukee Art Museum, Madison Museum of Contemporary Art, the Museum of Contemporary Photography in Chicago, the California Museum of Photography and various private collections.
Saturday
Jul
7
2018
Saturday, July 7, 2018 from 11am-5pm
11am-5pm
Venue:
@
Blue Sky Gallery
Which came first seeing or speaking? Just as people can verbalize their thoughts, they can visualize them, as well. But one must ask, what is the difference between looking and seeing? Can we do both, or do either take practice? What about imagination? Does it dull over time, or can our imaginations stay as vibrant as when we were children, if not more? How do we do that? What about memories, do they influence how we see things or how we imagine them? How does one communicate these experiences so that others can access them? In a two hour workshop, Alia Ali presents a platform for teachers, students, art enthusiasts and members of the community (14 and up) to explore image as a language. Ali conducts an interactive workshop on how to use light to transfer imagination into two dimensional artwork by engaging participants through discussions, brainstorming, sketching, and experimental activities. Individuals will leave the workshop feeling more enriched and confident in understanding image as a medium in which they can communicate their ideas, document their history, manifest expression, and hopefully, build an audience. Drawing from the work of photographers who have inspired, Alia Ali will also present experiences from her own portfolio of travel photography and fine/abstract art. MISSION: To challenge participants to think about image as a language, as tools and weapons. They will leave the workshop with a fresh perspective on “seeing” and “being seen”. “Borderlands, like textiles, are territories of exploration and zones in which we will be judged for our humanity.” In her photographic series BORDERLAND, Alia Ali uses portraiture to explore the liminal spaces surrounding human-made borders, which are often created as a result of conflict and violence. The portraits in the series feature textile artisans from eleven different regions wrapped in their own handiwork. Rendered anonymous and removed from their environmental and cultural contexts, these individuals become characters that the artist calls “–cludes.” As viewers we must decide how the subjects behind these fabrics will be included or excluded within our own unconscious and subjective categorizations. Ali writes, “We separate good from evil; familiar from unfamiliar; threat from safety; alien from native… We, influenced by categorizations create these dichotomies ourselves." Through this visual exercise, the artist asks us to consider: what are the fabricated barriers in society that inhibit the incorporation of others? Or are the obstacles just that: ideas, intuitions, fear, discriminations, and misunderstandings? Alia Ali (b. 1985, Austria) is a Yemeni-Bosnian-American multi-media artist. Having traveled to sixty-three countries, lived in seven, and grown up among five languages, her most comfortable mode of communication is through image and multi-sensory mediums. Ali is a graduate of the United World College of the Atlantic (UWCAC) and holds a BA in Studio Art and Middle Eastern Studies from Wellesley College. Her work has been featured at the Ogden Museum of Southern Art, the Marrakech Biennale as part of the Swiss-Moroccan KE’CH Collective, and Gulf Photo Plus Dubai during Art Week Dubai 2017. Her work has most recently been exhibited at the Peter Sillem Gallery (Germany), Galerie Siniya 28 (Morocco), Space Gallery (Maine, USA), Lianzhou Photo Festival (China), and Contemporary Art Center of New Orleans (USA). She has been awarded the Alice C. Cole '42 Grant of Wellesley College, LensCulture’s Emerging Talent Awards in 2016, and she was a Gold Winner in the Fine Art Category of the Tokyo International Foto Awards.
Thursday
Jul
5
2018
Thursday, July 5, 2018 from 5-6pm
5-6pm
Venue:
@
Blue Sky Gallery
Come join us as Alia Ali discusses her photo exhibition, BORDERLAND. “Borderlands, like textiles, are territories of exploration and zones in which we will be judged for our humanity.” In her photographic series BORDERLAND, Alia Ali uses portraiture to explore the liminal spaces surrounding human-made borders, which are often created as a result of conflict and violence. The portraits in the series feature textile artisans from eleven different regions wrapped in their own handiwork. Rendered anonymous and removed from their environmental and cultural contexts, these individuals become characters that the artist calls “–cludes.” As viewers we must decide how the subjects behind these fabrics will be included or excluded within our own unconscious and subjective categorizations. Ali writes, “We separate good from evil; familiar from unfamiliar; threat from safety; alien from native… We, influenced by categorizations create these dichotomies ourselves." Through this visual exercise, the artist asks us to consider: what are the fabricated barriers in society that inhibit the incorporation of others? Or are the obstacles just that: ideas, intuitions, fear, discriminations, and misunderstandings? Alia Ali (b. 1985, Austria) is a Yemeni-Bosnian-American multi-media artist. Having traveled to sixty-three countries, lived in seven, and grown up among five languages, her most comfortable mode of communication is through image and multi-sensory mediums. Ali is a graduate of the United World College of the Atlantic (UWCAC) and holds a BA in Studio Art and Middle Eastern Studies from Wellesley College. Her work has been featured at the Ogden Museum of Southern Art, the Marrakech Biennale as part of the Swiss-Moroccan KE’CH Collective, and Gulf Photo Plus Dubai during Art Week Dubai 2017. Her work has most recently been exhibited at the Peter Sillem Gallery (Germany), Galerie Siniya 28 (Morocco), Space Gallery (Maine, USA), Lianzhou Photo Festival (China), and Contemporary Art Center of New Orleans (USA). She has been awarded the Alice C. Cole '42 Grant of Wellesley College, LensCulture’s Emerging Talent Awards in 2016, and she was a Gold Winner in the Fine Art Category of the Tokyo International Foto Awards.
Thursday, July 5, 2018 at noon through Sunday, July 29, 2018 at 5pm
noon through Sunday, July 29 at 5pm
Venue:
@
Blue Sky Gallery
For the last thirteen years, Pedro David has been photographing commercial eucalyptus groves that are quickly replacing the natural forests throughout much of Brazil. Since the early 1900s, eucalyptus plantations have greatly diminished the biodiversity of the country’s forests, depleting the soil and consuming water and other vital resources at such a rapid pace that this phenomenon has become a global concern. In his Hardwood series, David photographs the rows of eucalyptus as they overtake the native Sucupira, Pequizeiro, Araticum, and Palo Tierra species, drawing viewers into these unnatural yet alluring landscapes. Pedro David (b. 1977, Brazil) completed his BA in journalism at the Pontifical Catholic University of Minas Gerais State in Belo Horizonte, Brazil and holds a graduate degree in contemporary fine arts from the Escola Guignard, Universidade do Estado de Minas Gerais in Brazil. He has published numerous books, including Underwater Landscape (2008); The Garden (2012); Route Root (2013); and Catharsis Phase (2014). His work is housed in the collections of the Musée du Quai Branly, Paris; the Museu de Arte Moderna de São Paulo, Brazil; the Museu Nacional da República, Brasília; and the Minas Gerais State Museum, Belo Horizonte, Brazil. Blue Sky exhibited David’s series 360 Square Meters in 2015 and the Hardwood series was recently exhibited at the Art Museum of the Americas in Washington, DC.
Thursday, July 5, 2018 at noon through Sunday, July 29, 2018 at 5pm
noon through Sunday, July 29 at 5pm
Venue:
@
Blue Sky Gallery
“Borderlands, like textiles, are territories of exploration and zones in which we will be judged for our humanity.” In her photographic series BORDERLAND, Alia Ali uses portraiture to explore the liminal spaces surrounding human-made borders, which are often created as a result of conflict and violence. The portraits in the series feature textile artisans from eleven different regions wrapped in their own handiwork. Rendered anonymous and removed from their environmental and cultural contexts, these individuals become characters that the artist calls “–cludes.” As viewers we must decide how the subjects behind these fabrics will be included or excluded within our own unconscious and subjective categorizations. Ali writes, “We separate good from evil; familiar from unfamiliar; threat from safety; alien from native… We, influenced by categorizations create these dichotomies ourselves." Through this visual exercise, the artist asks us to consider: what are the fabricated barriers in society that inhibit the incorporation of others? Or are the obstacles just that: ideas, intuitions, fear, discriminations, and misunderstandings? Alia Ali (b. 1985, Austria) is a Yemeni-Bosnian-American multi-media artist. Having traveled to sixty-three countries, lived in seven, and grown up among five languages, her most comfortable mode of communication is through image and multi-sensory mediums. Ali is a graduate of the United World College of the Atlantic (UWCAC) and holds a BA in Studio Art and Middle Eastern Studies from Wellesley College. Her work has been featured at the Ogden Museum of Southern Art, the Marrakech Biennale as part of the Swiss-Moroccan KE’CH Collective, and Gulf Photo Plus Dubai during Art Week Dubai 2017. Her work has most recently been exhibited at the Peter Sillem Gallery (Germany), Galerie Siniya 28 (Morocco), Space Gallery (Maine, USA), Lianzhou Photo Festival (China), and Contemporary Art Center of New Orleans (USA). She has been awarded the Alice C. Cole '42 Grant of Wellesley College, LensCulture’s Emerging Talent Awards in 2016, and she was a Gold Winner in the Fine Art Category of the Tokyo International Foto Awards.