Blue Sky Gallery

Location

122 NW 8th Ave
Portland
,
OR
97209
,
US

Website

Description

Free admission!

Future Events

Saturday
Oct
28
2017
Saturday, October 28, 2017 from 3-4:30pm
3-4:30pm
Venue:
@
Blue Sky Gallery
Pacific NW Drawers Artist Talk with O'Hara Shipe and Nolan Streitberger Saturday, October 28, 3:00 PM All Blue Sky events and programs are free and open to the public. Join us for a special afternoon with artists O'Hara Shipe and Nolan Streitberger as they speak about their photo series currently on view in Blue Sky's 2017 Drawers exhibition. Both artists have created bodies of work that disrupt stereotypes of women and girls and tell important stories that are often eclipsed by dominant cultural narratives. In Shipe's series, Beyond the Game: Defining the Female Athlete, she provides visual space for her subjects to unabashedly present themselves to the world as they want to be seen, while Streitberger's photo essay following his 6-year-old daughter's daily summer activities highlights her delightfully unselfconscious strength, independence, defiance, and playfulness. Blue Sky established the Pacific Northwest Photography Viewing Drawers program in 2007 to feature a juried, public archive of original prints by contemporary photographers based in the region. The Drawers program has quickly become a favorite aspect of Blue Sky’s ongoing programming, featuring original prints by more than 60 artists based in Alaska, British Columbia, Washington, Oregon, Idaho, and Montana. The Drawers is a year-long exhibition, changing every April to coincide with Portland Photo Month, and available to approximately 25,000 visitors annually.

Past Events

Saturday
Sep
9
2017
Saturday, September 9, 2017 from 3-4pm
3-4pm
Venue:
@
Blue Sky Gallery
Eunjong Lee "Seoul Physiognomy" September 7–October 1, 2017 along with Alejandra Laviada - "Geometry of Space" First Thursday Opening Reception September 1, 6:00–9:00 PM Artist talks: Alejandra Laviada: Thursday, September 7, 5:00 PM Eunjong Lee: Saturday, September 9, 3:00 PM What is the face of of Seoul? What is its character? How does our memory of a place impact the reality of what we see today? Eunjong Lee's large-scale color prints in Seoul Physiognomy depict the changing landscape of Seoul, South Korea, while also expressing Lee's own uncertainty about this change. Taken at face value, it is an exploration of the geometry of a city, where rooftops, roads, and infrastructure meld into a sea of lines and shapes. Looking deeper, the series is a reflection on our own understanding of self in relation to a city that has become increasingly unfamiliar. Eunjong Lee is a photographer living and working in Seoul, South Korea. She graduated with an MA in Photography & Visual Media from Sang-Myung University in Seoul. Her work has been featured in various solo and group exhibitions worldwide at venues such as the Houston Center for Photography in Houston, Texas; Talmart Galerie in Paris, France; Pine Street Creative Arts Centre in Sydney, Australia; Hannover Messe in Hannover, Germany; the Higashikawa Foto Festival in Hokkaidou, Japan; and the Fotofo festival in Bratislava, Slovakia. In 2008 Lee also curated and exhibited her work in The Game of Places group show at UTS Gallery in Sydney, Australia. This is Lee’s first solo exhibition in the United States.
Thursday
Sep
7
2017
Thursday, September 7, 2017 from 5-6pm
5-6pm
Venue:
@
Blue Sky Gallery
Alejandra Laviada - "Geometry of Space" September 7–October 1, 2017 along with Eunjong Lee "Seoul Physiognomy" First Thursday Opening Reception September 1, 6:00–9:00 PM Artist talks: Alejandra Laviada: Thursday, September 7, 5:00 PM Eunjong Lee: Saturday, September 9, 3:00 PM “As with the rest of my work, these images lie at the intersection between painting, photography and sculpture. By composing and layering the images inside the camera, the photographic medium and process become like a painter’s blank canvas. The camera is, by nature, a representational device, but it can also abstract and reveal an alternate reality invisible to the naked eye.” Inspired, by Laszlo Moholy-Nagy’s paintings of intersecting geometric planes, Geometry of Space is a series of sculptural compositions Alejandra Laviada creates in-camera by layering multiple exposures within single images. The geometric forms in her vibrant color prints appear to be suspended in space, yet the images are constructed entirely without digital manipulation. As she makes each exposure, Laviada alters her vantage point to change the scale, transparency, or shape of each object, while simultaneously employing filters to affect the color of each layer. Because each photograph is made using film, much of the work requires careful planning, but the artist also playfully leaves some elements of creation to chance. Laviada’s painterly approach to photography mirrors Moholy-Nagy’s, who, as a photographer as well as a painter, believed that “the camera should be liberated from its role of recording the natural world in order to create abstract pictures of light and form.” Alejandra Laviada (b. 1980) is an artist living and working in Mexico City where she is a member of the photography collective POC. She completed her BFA in Painting at the Rhode Island School of Design and received an MFA in photography from the School of Visual Arts in New York. In 2010, Laviada won the Photography Biennial in Mexico City, and in 2009 she was awarded Photo España’s Descubrimientos Prize for her Photo Sculpture series. She is also the recipient of the FONCA Young Creators grant for 2012–13. Her work has been exhibited widely, and has been shown in various photography festivals including Hyeres, The New York Photo Festival, Photo España, and Guatephoto, among others. Geometry of Space is Laviada’s second solo show at Blue Sky.
Thursday
Jul
6
2017
Thursday, July 6, 2017 at noon through Sunday, July 30, 2017 at 5pm
noon through Sunday, July 30 at 5pm
Venue:
@
Blue Sky Gallery
First Thursday Opening Reception July 6, 6:00–9:00 PM Artist Nakeya Brown in conversation with Portland curator Ashley Stull Meyers: Friday July 7, 5:00 PM “Each photograph I compose is a reflection of my female identity positioned within hair politics, hair rituals, and black culture. The scope of my work reconsiders racialized beauty standards and defines the bountiful actualities of African American women. Pulling from past memories and observations, I use photography as a tool to navigate the influence of race and gender in shaping perception and representation.” In July, Nakeya Brown will exhibit selections from six of her photo-based series at Blue Sky. In her work, Brown uses photography to subvert dominant narratives surrounding feminine beauty and focuses her lens on the experiences of African American women. In her series If Nostalgia Were Colored Brown, the artist creates reverent tableaux of vintage album covers and objects used for beautification to pay homage to a history of black feminine spaces of self care. Brown also explores her own family’s hair rituals through conceptual portraiture and still life in Hair Stories Untold and Gestures of My Bio-Myth, and she questions the consumption of racialized standards of beauty in her more performative photo series The Refutation of “Good” Hair and in her staged compositions of haircare products, Facade Objects. In her most recent series, Mass Consumption Comes Home, Brown photographs mass-produced personal objects of the past in front of vintage floral wallpaper, drawing attention to the relationship between these products of assembly-line labor and their final homes within the domestic sphere, historically a site of women's paid and unpaid labor in addition to self-care. Nakeya Brown was born in Santa Maria, California in 1988. She received her BA in Visual Arts and Journalism & Media Studies from Rutgers University and her Master of Fine Arts from The George Washington University. Her photography has been exhibited at the McKenna Museum of African American Art, Woman Made Gallery, Hamiltonian Gallery, and The Urban Institute for Contemporary Art. Brown’s work has been featured in New York Mag, Dazed & Confused, The Fader, TIME, and Vice. Her work has been included in photography books Babe and Girl on Girl: Art and Photography in the Age of the Female Gaze. Brown was awarded the 2017 Snider Prize by the Museum of Contemporary Photography. She currently lives and works in Washington, D.C. Between Sheets and Seamless is part of the Embodied: Asserting Self exhibition series, which is generously supported by Arlene Schnitzer and Jordan Schnitzer. Blue Sky Gallery in July Sage Sohier Witness to Beauty Artist talk with Sage Sohier: Thursday, July 6, 5:00 PM All Blue Sky events and programs are free and open to the public.
Thursday, July 6, 2017 at noon through Sunday, July 30, 2017 at 5pm
noon through Sunday, July 30 at 5pm
Venue:
@
Blue Sky Gallery
First Thursday Opening Reception July 6, 6:00–9:00 PM Artist talk with Sage Sohier: Thursday, July 6, 5:00 PM “For a brief period in her youth my mother was a model, photographed by Richard Avedon and Irving Penn, and once on the cover of LIFE Magazine. As a child, I grew up as a witness to her beauty: I used to lie on her bed, with the dogs, and watch her try on clothes and study herself critically in the mirror. As I grew older, there was no use competing with her and so I assumed my position, quite happily, on the other side of the camera.” In Witness to Beauty, photographer Sage Sohier presents images of her mother, former fashion model Wendy Morgan, whom she has been photographing since the 1990s. These vibrant color portraits of Morgan are both posed and candid, and often include Sohier herself along with her sister, Laine, to reveal tender, humorous, and at times, tense moments in front of the camera. Despite societal pressures to conform to youth-obsessed standards of feminine beauty, Sohier's nuanced tribute to her mother highlights strength and stoicism in the face of aging and more importantly, the lasting beauty found in experiencing life's joys and sharing them with others. Sage Sohier has been photographing people in their environments for more than 30 years. She holds a B.A. from Harvard University and has received fellowships from the No Strings Foundation, the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation, the National Endowment for the Arts, and the Massachusetts Artists Foundation. Sohier has exhibited solo shows at Foley Gallery in New York, Carroll and Sons Gallery in Boston, and The Museum of Contemporary Photography in Chicago. Her work has also been included in group shows at the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) and the International Center of Photography in New York, the Art Institute of Chicago, and many other venues. Sohier’s work is in the collections of MoMA, the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, the Cleveland Museum of Art, the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, the Portland Art Museum, and the Brooklyn Museum, among others. Sohier’s monograph of Witness to Beauty was recently published in 2016 by Kehrer Verlag. Other monographs by Sohier include At Home with Themselves: Same-Sex Couples in 1980s America (Spotted Books, 2014), About Face (Columbia College Chicago Press, 2012), and Perfectible Worlds (Photolucida, 2007). This is Sohier’s sixth show at Blue Sky. Blue Sky Gallery in July Nakeya Brown Between Sheets and Seamless Artist Nakeya Brown in conversation with Portland curator Ashley Stull Meyers: Friday July 7, 5:00 PM All Blue Sky events and programs are free and open to the public.
Thursday
May
4
2017
Thursday, May 4, 2017 at noon through Sunday, May 28, 2017 at 5pm
noon through Sunday, May 28 at 5pm
Venue:
@
Blue Sky Gallery
Seiya Bowen Nadachi Aleksey Kondratyev Ice Fishers May 4–28, 2017 First Thursday Opening Reception May 4, 6:00–9:00 PM Artist talk with Seiya Bowen: Thursday, May 4, 5:00 PM Artist talk with Aleksey Kondratyev: Saturday, May 6, 3:00 PM All Blue Sky events and programs are free and open to the public. Aleksey Kondratyev’s Ice Fishers is a visual study of makeshift shelters used by Kazakh fishers as they fish along the frozen Ishim River. North-Central Kazakhstan is one of the coldest populated regions on Earth, yet many fishermen use nothing more than trash bags and salvaged plastic to protect themselves from subzero temperatures and biting winds. Despite this harsh environment, Kondratyev’s photographs reveal the beauty of these improvised structures, drawing attention to the material and shape of each functional sculpture as it floats within an endless expanse of white. Aleksey Kondratyev (b.1993 in Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan) works between Detroit, Michigan and Central Asia. In 2015 he completed a fellowship at Fabrica, a communication research center based in Treviso, Italy, allowing him to travel throughout Central Asia to complete his Formations series. He is also the director and co-founder of Stand Quarterly. an international contemporary art journal. This is his first solo exhibition of Ice Fishers.
Thursday, May 4, 2017 at noon through Sunday, May 28, 2017 at 5pm
noon through Sunday, May 28 at 5pm
Venue:
@
Blue Sky Gallery
Seiya Bowen Nadachi Aleksey Kondratyev Ice Fishers May 4–28, 2017 First Thursday Opening Reception May 4, 6:00–9:00 PM Artist talk with Seiya Bowen: Thursday, May 4, 5:00 PM Artist talk with Aleksey Kondratyev: Saturday, May 6, 3:00 PM All Blue Sky events and programs are free and open to the public. “Each summer for over a decade, I returned to my childhood home in Japan. With every visit, the town faded away, slowly being replaced by a new infrastructure of bullet trains and fast-speed freeways.” In Nadachi, Seiya Bowen examines the socio-economic transformation of rural Japan by focusing his lens on the changes affecting the small town where his grandparents once lived. With increased urban development, many are abandoning Japan’s countryside for economic opportunities available in its metropolitan centers, leaving the older residents behind. Bowen’s quiet color photographs compose an intimate portrait of Nadachi alongside the striking visual evidence of the encroaching transportation systems moving people toward the larger cities. In this way, Bowen skillfully illustrates how these two worlds uncomfortably coexist within the same landscape, while also coming to terms with the personal loss of a particular way of life. Seiya Bowen is a photographer currently based in Albuquerque, New Mexico. He graduated from the University of New Mexico with a BFA in 2014 and has since exhibited both nationally and internationally at venues such as SITE Santa Fe and the Center for Fine Art Photography in Fort Collins, Colorado. Bowen’s photography has been featured in Fraction Magazine, PDN and Aint-Bad Magazine, among other publications. This is his first solo exhibition of Nadachi.
Thursday
Apr
6
2017
Thursday, April 6, 2017 at noon through Sunday, April 30, 2017 at 5pm
noon through Sunday, April 30 at 5pm
Venue:
@
Blue Sky Gallery
2016 Critical Mass Solo Exhibition Award in collaboration with Photolucida: Ervin A. Johnson #InHonor Cristián Ureta Volviendo a la Tierra April 6–30, 2017 First Thursday Opening Reception April 6, 6:00–9:00 PM Artist Talk by Cristián Ureta with special Drawers artist talk by Stefan Lesueur: Friday, April 7, 12:00 PM Artist Ervin A. Johnson in conversation with Portland curator Ashley Stull Meyers: Saturday, April 8, 3:00 PM All Blue Sky events and programs are free and open to the public. “This is the end of a hundred years' history of a mining camp that became a small city of 25, 000 people. This is the last part of a story of a death foretold, related to an important part of the development of my country.” From 2003 to 2005 Cristián Ureta photographed the Chilean mining town of Chuquicamata. Environmental hazards and the expansion of the nearby copper mine led to its closure in 2007, forcing its inhabitants to relocate to the nearby city of Calama. Ureta’s work is a visual study of what was left behind, with his measured black-and-white images unflinchingly documenting the largely unpopulated streets, houses, and public spaces harshly lit by the desert sun. Volviendo a la Tierra eloquently bears witness to the memory of a town and its people before it returns to the earth, ultimately buried by the industry that created it. Cristian Ureta, born in Buenos Aires, Argentina in 1973, currently lives and works in Santiago, Chile. He studied advertising at the University of the Pacific in Santiago de Chile and is currently a candidate for a master's degree in image studies at the Universidad Alberto Hurtado. A self-taught photographer, Ureta began working in the medium in 1997 and has subsequently won several nation and international prizes and scholarships, and has exhibited extensively throughout Chile and at multiple international photography festivals. In 2012 he published the monograph VIVEN: Periplo por Poetas de Chile, followed by Volviendo a la Tierra in 2012. This is the first solo exhibition of Volviendo a la Tierra in the United States.
Thursday, April 6, 2017 at noon through Sunday, April 30, 2017 at 5pm
noon through Sunday, April 30 at 5pm
Venue:
@
Blue Sky Gallery
2016 Critical Mass Solo Exhibition Award in collaboration with Photolucida: Ervin A. Johnson #InHonor Cristián Ureta Volviendo a la Tierra April 6–30, 2017 First Thursday Opening Reception April 6, 6:00–9:00 PM Artist Talk by Cristián Ureta with special Drawers artist talk by Stefan Lesueur: Friday, April 7, 12:00 PM Artist Ervin A. Johnson in conversation with Portland curator Ashley Stull Meyers: Saturday, April 8, 3:00 PM All Blue Sky events and programs are free and open to the public. Ervin A. Johnson “I began #InHonor as a personal response to the killings of Black people across America. To be completely honest the work was born out of guilt. All of my friends had rallied up in arms to march for Trayvon Martin and Eric Garner. I, on the other hand, was nowhere to be found...What real change would come of my presence as a young gay black man at a march in which half of my people don’t accept or acknowledge me? Still, though, I felt moved to do something.” #InHonor is an ongoing series of photo-based mixed media portraits that honor Blackness in its many forms, while also acknowledging the violence and destruction taking place in America in the form of police brutality. After printing each portrait he has composed, Johnson uses various solvents to remove pigments from the print’s surface. He then reintroduces color to the image using acrylic paints and inks to further abstract the subject's skin tone and facial features, challenging viewers to rethink preconceived notions of what skin color signifies within our society. Each larger-than-life portrait is an homage to each individual pictured, yet the symbolic violence of Johnson’s material interventions into each photograph cannot be ignored. The artist plans to continue his work on #InHonor for as long as lives are lost due to racism and police brutality. Blue Sky is pleased to present #InHonor as the 2016 Critical Mass Solo Exhibition Award in conjunction with Photolucida. Ervin A. Johnson was born and raised in Chicago, Illinois. He graduated from the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign with a bachelor's degree in rhetoric and subsequently completed his second bachelor's degree at Columbia College Chicago in photography. Most recently, he graduated with his MFA in photography from Savannah College of Art and Design in Georgia and has exhibited work from his #InHonor series at Arnika Dawkins Gallery in Atlanta, Georgia.
Thursday
Mar
2
2017
Thursday, March 2, 2017 at noon through Sunday, April 2, 2017 at 5pm
noon through Sunday, April 2 at 5pm
Venue:
@
Blue Sky Gallery
Tara Sellios Testimony Lauren Semivan Observatory March 2–April 2, 2017 First Thursday Opening Reception March 2, 6:00–9:00 PM Artist Talks: Lauren Semivan: Thursday, March 2, 5:00 PM Tara Sellios: Friday, March 3, 12:00 PM All Blue Sky events and programs are free and open to the public. "Death has always possessed a significant presence within the history of art, ranging from altarpieces to the work of the Dutch still life painters. Manifesting melancholic themes with beauty and precision, as these artists did, results in an image that is seductive, forcing the viewer to look, despite its apparent grotesque and morbid nature. Through these images, I aspire to make apparent the restlessness of a life that is knowingly so temporary and vulnerable.” Inspired by Last Judgement paintings of the Baroque era, Tara Sellios’ Testimony is a visual rumination upon the fragility, impermanence, and carnality of life. Her process is meticulous and deliberate, with each tableaux beginning as a detailed watercolor sketch. Sellios then translates each painting into sculpture, carefully placing rehydrated insect specimens and animal skeletons into intriguing configurations that she subsequently photographs with an 8x10 view camera. The resulting larger-than-life color photographic prints, which will be on view alongside selected watercolors, are meant to disrupt preconceived notions of death while also offering a space for contemplating our mortality. Tara Sellios (b. 1987) is an artist living and working in Boston, Massachusetts. She holds a BFA in Photography from The Art Institute of Boston and has exhibited extensively regionally and nationally. Her work has been featured in Photograph magazine, the Boston Globe, and on the Lenscratch photography blog. Blue Sky is honored to host Sellios’ first solo show on the West Coast.
Thursday, March 2, 2017 at noon through Sunday, April 2, 2017 at 9pm
noon through Sunday, April 2 at 9pm
Venue:
@
Blue Sky Gallery
Tara Sellios Testimony Lauren Semivan Observatory March 2–April 2, 2017 First Thursday Opening Reception March 2, 6:00–9:00 PM Artist Talks: Lauren Semivan: Thursday, March 2, 5:00 PM Tara Sellios: Friday, March 3, 12:00 PM All Blue Sky events and programs are free and open to the public. “Within each image, ghosts of previous drawings create a sense of time suspended, evoking gesture, atmosphere and memory. Photographs allow me to access the extraordinary, to keep a record of dreams, and to employ the unforeseen.” To create the large format black-and-white photographs that comprise Observatory, Lauren Semivan brings together the visual languages of drawing, still life painting, and performance to express her dreamlike interior narratives on film. Using charcoal and graphite, Semivan makes gestural marks on large backdrops, setting the emotional tone for each image and leaving traces of her presence. When Semivan does appear in the front of her 8x10 view camera, she often seems caught in a dance, her identity obscured within the image’s painterly abstraction. Strategically placed objects also populate the staged environment, adding additional layers for the eye to peruse and inviting us into the depths of the artist’s inner world. Lauren Semivan (b. 1981) is an artist living and working in Detroit, Michigan. She received a BA in studio art from Lawrence University in Appleton, Wisconsin, and an MFA in photography from Cranbrook Academy of Art. Her work has been exhibited nationally and internationally at many galleries and museums and she has taught photography at the College for Creative Studies, The Ohio State University, Virginia Commonwealth University, and Wayne State University. Semivan has received numerous awards for her work including Photolucida Critical Mass Top 50 and The Griffin Museum of Photography’s Griffin Award. Her work has appeared in The New Yorker, Artforum, and Photograph magazines and is part of the permanent collections at the Nelson Atkins Museum of Art, Cranbrook Art Museum, The Wriston Art Galleries at Lawrence University, and The Elton John Collection. She is represented by Benrubi Gallery in New York, and David Klein Gallery in Detroit, Michigan.