Blue Sky Gallery

Location

122 NW 8th Ave
Portland
,
OR
97209
,
US

Website

Description

Free admission!

Future Events

- No events -

Past Events

Thursday
Nov
1
2018
Thursday, November 1, 2018 from noon-5pm
noon-5pm
Venue:
@
Blue Sky Gallery
A group exhibition featuring the works of George Awde, Daniel Castro Garcia, Gohar Dashti, Tanya Habjouqa, and Stefanie Zofia Schulz Curated by Peggy Sue Amison First Thursday opening reception: November 1, 6:00–9:00 PM In Transit is a multidisciplinary exhibition that focuses on the tentative, limbo-like experience of living between different cultures. The exhibition explores the stories of immigrants who traverse the no-man’s land that exists between home and hope. The lives of those fleeing from unsafe, economically depressed homelands towards dreams of a more secure future are filled with boredom, sadness, fear, and apathy. They experience the deep absence of the loss of loved ones, familiar places, and citizenship. The photography and video works in this exhibition are created in Germany, Jordan, Lebanon, Italy, and Iran, and are testimonies to day-to-day survival alongside the struggle to find a sense of normalcy and stability and a place to call home. Utilizing photography, performance and filmmaking, each body of work examines the experiences of those thrust into a culture that is markedly different from their own. These stories illustrate the physical and psychological challenges faced, while additionally looking at the deeper discussion of what constitutes citizenship in the wake of the enormous migrations into Europe. Through their narratives, the artists strive to disrupt accepted misconceptions about immigration and otherness in order to tell a more accurate story. By collaborating with their subjects they give voice to those who must endure mountains of dead time while tangled up in bureaucracy in order to become more than merely ‘registered aliens.’
Saturday
Oct
6
2018
Saturday, October 6, 2018 from 3-4pm
3-4pm
Venue:
@
Blue Sky Gallery
Side Effects May Include is a photo-based installation by Tamara Staples that focuses on the relationship between mental health and poly-pharmacy, or the simultaneous use of multiple drugs by a single patient. The project was inspired by the artist’s sister, who took her life with a cocktail of pharmaceuticals after living with bipolar disorder for many years. Following her death, Staples collected the contents of her sister’s medicine cabinet, sorted the thousands of pills, arranged them in patterns, and photographed them. She then translated the photos into wallpaper, a quilt, upholstery, dresses, and drapes to create an entire room covered in pill-based patterns. This deceptively alluring and decorative display immerses the viewer in a cacophony of images, echoing the tremendous scope of the poly-pharmacy epidemic in the United States today. In conjunction with Side Effects May Include, Blue Sky will host a panel discussion about mental health and poly-pharmacy on Saturday, October 6th at 3PM. The panel will include mental health practitioners and individuals with lived experience including John Herold, Director of Puget Sound Hearing Voices; Gina Nikkel,PhD, President and CEO of The Foundation for Excellence in Mental Health Care; Sean Syrek, Department Director with the Mental Health Association of Oregon; and Tamara Staples, exhibiting artist. Moderated by scholar and educator of medical humanities Lois Leveen. Tamara Staples is an artist living and working in Brooklyn, New York. After she received her BFA in Photography from the University of Florida in Gainesville, she began her career as a prop stylist for print and television. Now a commercial and fine art photographer, her work has appeared in numerous publications including Harper’s Magazine, New York Times, Chicago Tribune Magazine, Food and Wine, Town and Country, Utne Reader and Bloomberg Business Magazine. Her work has been also featured on This American Life, CNN, Slate Magazine and NPR’s Animal House. Staples has exhibited at Davis Orton Gallery in Hudson, New York; Purdue University Galleries in Lafayette, Indiana; Georgia Museum of Art in Athens, Georgia; Ricco Maresca Gallery in New York City; Museum of Modern Art in Baltimore, Maryland; Aron Packer Gallery in Chicago, Illinois; and Lightworks Gallery in Charlotte, North Carolina. Staples is the recipient of a NYFA Grant, a PDN self promotion award, the 2014 Bronze award from the Royal Photographic Society, and has completed a Rauschenberg Residency. This is her second solo show at Blue Sky.
Thursday
Oct
4
2018
Thursday, October 4, 2018 from 5-6pm
5-6pm
Venue:
@
Blue Sky Gallery
“Through the framework of the self-portrait, I constantly navigate between self and otherness in my photography. Themes of likeness and representation are at the forefront of my picture making. I shift between comedy and tragedy, familiarity and foreignness, performer and camera operator.” In I’m Only Here to Leave, Tommy Kha amplifies the performative and iterative nature of self-representation through his uncanny photographs and video installation that creatively engage others and his surroundings. The artist re-photographs cardboard cutouts of himself in various environments and creates “masks” of his own likeness to cover the faces of the people he photographs. Kha’s self-portraits, which tend to look like simple collages or crude Photoshop manipulations, draw attention to the fact that something—the artist’s body—is out of place. He notes that by superimposing his face onto those who embody the things he desires to emphasize about himself, he is attempting to become “more queer, more Asian, more Southern.” Tommy Kha is a photographer based between Brooklyn, New York and his hometown of Memphis, Tennessee. He holds an MFA in Photography from Yale University and he is a recipient of a 2017 En Foco Photography Fellowship. Kha also received the Jessie and Dolph Smith Emeritus Award and was named a Magenta Foundation Flash Forward emerging photographer. He has been the artist-in-residence at the Center for Photography at Woodstock, Light Work, Fountainhead, and Baxter Street at the Camera Club of New York. In December 2015 Kha published his first monograph, A Real Imitation, through Aint-Bad and his work was featured on the cover of Vice Magazine’s 2017 Photography Issue. He occasionally performs, writes, and appears in some films, including Laurie Simmons’ feature, My Art.
Thursday, October 4, 2018 at noon through Sunday, October 28, 2018 at 5pm
noon through Sunday, October 28 at 5pm
Venue:
@
Blue Sky Gallery
“Through the framework of the self-portrait, I constantly navigate between self and otherness in my photography. Themes of likeness and representation are at the forefront of my picture making. I shift between comedy and tragedy, familiarity and foreignness, performer and camera operator.” In I’m Only Here to Leave, Tommy Kha amplifies the performative and iterative nature of self-representation through his uncanny photographs and video installation that creatively engage others and his surroundings. The artist re-photographs cardboard cutouts of himself in various environments and creates “masks” of his own likeness to cover the faces of the people he photographs. Kha’s self-portraits, which tend to look like simple collages or crude Photoshop manipulations, draw attention to the fact that something—the artist’s body—is out of place. He notes that by superimposing his face onto those who embody the things he desires to emphasize about himself, he is attempting to become “more queer, more Asian, more Southern.” Tommy Kha is a photographer based between Brooklyn, New York and his hometown of Memphis, Tennessee. He holds an MFA in Photography from Yale University and he is a recipient of a 2017 En Foco Photography Fellowship. Kha also received the Jessie and Dolph Smith Emeritus Award and was named a Magenta Foundation Flash Forward emerging photographer. He has been the artist-in-residence at the Center for Photography at Woodstock, Light Work, Fountainhead, and Baxter Street at the Camera Club of New York. In December 2015 Kha published his first monograph, A Real Imitation, through Aint-Bad and his work was featured on the cover of Vice Magazine’s 2017 Photography Issue. He occasionally performs, writes, and appears in some films, including Laurie Simmons’ feature, My Art.
Thursday, October 4, 2018 at noon through Sunday, October 28, 2018 at 5pm
noon through Sunday, October 28 at 5pm
Venue:
@
Blue Sky Gallery
Side Effects May Include is a photo-based installation by Tamara Staples that focuses on the relationship between mental health and poly-pharmacy, or the simultaneous use of multiple drugs by a single patient. The project was inspired by the artist’s sister, who took her life with a cocktail of pharmaceuticals after living with bipolar disorder for many years. Following her death, Staples collected the contents of her sister’s medicine cabinet, sorted the thousands of pills, arranged them in patterns, and photographed them. She then translated the photos into wallpaper, a quilt, upholstery, dresses, and drapes to create an entire room covered in pill-based patterns. This deceptively alluring and decorative display immerses the viewer in a cacophony of images, echoing the tremendous scope of the poly-pharmacy epidemic in the United States today. In conjunction with Side Effects May Include, Blue Sky will host a panel discussion about mental health and poly-pharmacy on Saturday, October 6th at 3PM. The panel will include mental health practitioners and individuals with lived experience including John Herold, Director of Puget Sound Hearing Voices; Gina Nikkel,PhD, President and CEO of The Foundation for Excellence in Mental Health Care; Sean Syrek, Department Director with the Mental Health Association of Oregon; and Tamara Staples, exhibiting artist. Moderated by scholar and educator of medical humanities Lois Leveen. Tamara Staples is an artist living and working in Brooklyn, New York. After she received her BFA in Photography from the University of Florida in Gainesville, she began her career as a prop stylist for print and television. Now a commercial and fine art photographer, her work has appeared in numerous publications including Harper’s Magazine, New York Times, Chicago Tribune Magazine, Food and Wine, Town and Country, Utne Reader and Bloomberg Business Magazine. Her work has been also featured on This American Life, CNN, Slate Magazine and NPR’s Animal House. Staples has exhibited at Davis Orton Gallery in Hudson, New York; Purdue University Galleries in Lafayette, Indiana; Georgia Museum of Art in Athens, Georgia; Ricco Maresca Gallery in New York City; Museum of Modern Art in Baltimore, Maryland; Aron Packer Gallery in Chicago, Illinois; and Lightworks Gallery in Charlotte, North Carolina. Staples is the recipient of a NYFA Grant, a PDN self promotion award, the 2014 Bronze award from the Royal Photographic Society, and has completed a Rauschenberg Residency. This is her second solo show at Blue Sky.
Saturday
Sep
29
2018
Saturday, September 29, 2018 from 3-4pm
3-4pm
Venue:
@
Blue Sky Gallery
Touch is an exhibition featuring over 70 prints from the photography collection of Blue Sky co-founder and photographer Christopher Rauschenberg. The show was inspired by a particular image: Charles Harbutt’s 1961 photograph of a blind boy delicately touching a beam of light (above). This led Rauschenberg to bring together the many other works in his collection that visually capture this poignant human sensory experience in its myriad forms. Touch features photographs by the following artists: Thomas Alleman, Catherine Angel, Talya C. Arbisser, Eugene Atget, Rich Bergeman, Cecilia Berkovic, Skyra Beveridge, Richard Brown, Tom Champion, Jamila Clarke, Vernoll Coleman, Celeste Cottingham, Paul Dahlquist, Arstide Economopoulos, Sidney Felsen, Michelle Frankfurter, Mary Frey, Patricia Galagan, Dorothy Glenn, Alison Grippo, M Bruce Hall, Anita Hamremoen, Charles Harbutt, Phil Harris, Craig Hickman, Ann Hughes, Birney Imes III, Gwynne Johnson, Sara Kirschenbaum, Les Krims, Justine Kurland, Dorthea Lange, Robert Langham, Zun Lee, Catherine Leuthold, Holly Lynton, Chema Madoz, Heather McClintock, July Mihaly, Jennifer Lynn Morse, Zanele Muholi, David Pace, Gordon Parks, Keri Pickett, Ann Ploeger, Gus Powell, Romualdas Požerskis, Jana Romanova, Irina Rozovsky, Nadia Sablin, Kris Sanford, Dona Schwartz, Joshua Smith, Jan Sonnenmair, Larry Sultan, Chip Thomas, Paul Trevor, and Carol Yarrow. In addition to the work by the above artists, during the month of September the Blue Sky community is invited to submit their own Touch photographs via Instagram using the hashtag #touchbluesky. Rauschenberg will print his favorite submissions and add them to the exhibition during the run of the show. Christopher Rauschenberg received his BA from The Evergreen State College in Olympia, Washington. His work has been exhibited at the Griffin Museum of Photography in Winchester, MA, the Chicago Cultural Center, the International Center of Photography in New York, and the George Eastman House in Rochester, NY, among many other major institutions. An exceptionally active leader in the Northwest arts community, he taught at Marylhurst College in Lake Oswego, Oregon for many years and co-founded Nine Gallery here in Blue Sky and photography nonprofit Photolucida, in addition to co-founding Blue Sky Gallery in 1975.
Saturday
Sep
8
2018
Saturday, September 8, 2018 from 3-4pm
3-4pm
Venue:
@
Blue Sky Gallery
“This series borrows from personal experience, and the visual language of the everyday in order to create a fictional account that mirrors my reality. Photographs are reductions, distillations, half-truths and complete fabrications. They can only describe the surface of things, while I am interested in the intangible – memory and emotional resonance.” Matt Eich photographed I Love You, I’m Leaving during a difficult time in his family’s life: his parents separated after 33 years of marriage, while his siblings were experiencing drastic changes in their personal lives and he and his wife and two children moved to a new city. This emotionally-charged black-and-white series is not strictly memoir, but exists somewhere in-between documentary and fiction. For Eich, the title reflects a constant in his life, which he calls “the rhythm of my peripatetic life.” He notes that “it holds true when I leave my family to photograph strangers, and leave strangers to return home.” Matt Eich (b. 1986) studied photojournalism at Ohio University and holds an MFA in Photography from Hartford Art School’s International Limited-Residency Program. He is a Professional Lecturer of Photography at The George Washington University and lives in Charlottesville, Virginia with his wife and two daughters. Matt’s work has been widely exhibited and received numerous grants and recognitions, including PDN’s 30 Emerging Photographers to Watch, the Joop Swart Masterclass, an Aaron Siskind Fellowship, and two Getty Images Grants for Editorial Photography. Matt’s prints are held in the permanent collections of The Portland Art Museum, the Museum of Fine Arts Houston, The New York Public Library, Chrysler Museum of Art and others. This is Eich’s second solo show at Blue Sky.
Thursday
Sep
6
2018
Thursday, September 6, 2018 at noon through Sunday, September 30, 2018 at 5pm
noon through Sunday, September 30 at 5pm
Venue:
@
Blue Sky Gallery
Touch is an exhibition featuring over 70 prints from the photography collection of Blue Sky co-founder and photographer Christopher Rauschenberg. The show was inspired by a particular image: Charles Harbutt’s 1961 photograph of a blind boy delicately touching a beam of light (above). This led Rauschenberg to bring together the many other works in his collection that visually capture this poignant human sensory experience in its myriad forms. Touch features photographs by the following artists: Thomas Alleman, Catherine Angel, Talya C. Arbisser, Eugene Atget, Rich Bergeman, Cecilia Berkovic, Skyra Beveridge, Richard Brown, Tom Champion, Jamila Clarke, Vernoll Coleman, Celeste Cottingham, Paul Dahlquist, Arstide Economopoulos, Sidney Felsen, Michelle Frankfurter, Mary Frey, Patricia Galagan, Dorothy Glenn, Alison Grippo, M Bruce Hall, Anita Hamremoen, Charles Harbutt, Phil Harris, Craig Hickman, Ann Hughes, Birney Imes III, Gwynne Johnson, Sara Kirschenbaum, Les Krims, Justine Kurland, Dorthea Lange, Robert Langham, Zun Lee, Catherine Leuthold, Holly Lynton, Chema Madoz, Heather McClintock, July Mihaly, Jennifer Lynn Morse, Zanele Muholi, David Pace, Gordon Parks, Keri Pickett, Ann Ploeger, Gus Powell, Romualdas Požerskis, Jana Romanova, Irina Rozovsky, Nadia Sablin, Kris Sanford, Dona Schwartz, Joshua Smith, Jan Sonnenmair, Larry Sultan, Chip Thomas, Paul Trevor, and Carol Yarrow. In addition to the work by the above artists, during the month of September the Blue Sky community is invited to submit their own Touch photographs via Instagram using the hashtag #touchbluesky. Rauschenberg will print his favorite submissions and add them to the exhibition during the run of the show. Christopher Rauschenberg received his BA from The Evergreen State College in Olympia, Washington. His work has been exhibited at the Griffin Museum of Photography in Winchester, MA, the Chicago Cultural Center, the International Center of Photography in New York, and the George Eastman House in Rochester, NY, among many other major institutions. An exceptionally active leader in the Northwest arts community, he taught at Marylhurst College in Lake Oswego, Oregon for many years and co-founded Nine Gallery here in Blue Sky and photography nonprofit Photolucida, in addition to co-founding Blue Sky Gallery in 1975.
Thursday, September 6, 2018 at noon through Sunday, September 30, 2018 at 5pm
noon through Sunday, September 30 at 5pm
Venue:
@
Blue Sky Gallery
“This series borrows from personal experience, and the visual language of the everyday in order to create a fictional account that mirrors my reality. Photographs are reductions, distillations, half-truths and complete fabrications. They can only describe the surface of things, while I am interested in the intangible – memory and emotional resonance.” Matt Eich photographed I Love You, I’m Leaving during a difficult time in his family’s life: his parents separated after 33 years of marriage, while his siblings were experiencing drastic changes in their personal lives and he and his wife and two children moved to a new city. This emotionally-charged black-and-white series is not strictly memoir, but exists somewhere in-between documentary and fiction. For Eich, the title reflects a constant in his life, which he calls “the rhythm of my peripatetic life.” He notes that “it holds true when I leave my family to photograph strangers, and leave strangers to return home.” Matt Eich (b. 1986) studied photojournalism at Ohio University and holds an MFA in Photography from Hartford Art School’s International Limited-Residency Program. He is a Professional Lecturer of Photography at The George Washington University and lives in Charlottesville, Virginia with his wife and two daughters. Matt’s work has been widely exhibited and received numerous grants and recognitions, including PDN’s 30 Emerging Photographers to Watch, the Joop Swart Masterclass, an Aaron Siskind Fellowship, and two Getty Images Grants for Editorial Photography. Matt’s prints are held in the permanent collections of The Portland Art Museum, the Museum of Fine Arts Houston, The New York Public Library, Chrysler Museum of Art and others. This is Eich’s second solo show at Blue Sky.
Thursday
Aug
2
2018
Thursday, August 2, 2018 from 5-6pm
5-6pm
Venue:
@
Blue Sky Gallery
Come join us as Julie Anand discusses her joint exhibition with Damon Sauer. In their photography series Ground Truth, Julie Anand and Damon Sauer investigate our relationship to the vast networks of information encircling the globe by photographing what remains of the Corona project. This surveillance initiative began in the mid-1960s by the CIA and US Air Force and involved using satellites to take aerial photographs of the Soviet Union and China. The cameras on these satellites were calibrated with concrete crosses 60 feet in diameter, which provided a reference for scale and ensured images were in focus. Approximately 256 of these markers were placed on a 16-square-mile grid in Arizona, spaced a mile apart. Long after Corona’s end and its declassification in 1995, around 100 remain, which Anand and Sauer spent three years photographing. In their images, each concrete cross is overpowered by an expansive sky, onto which the artists map the paths of specific satellites present at the moment each photograph was taken. For the Anand and Sauer, “these markers of space have become markers of time, representing a poignant moment in geopolitical and technologic social history.” Julie Anand and Damon Sauer are artists and educators based in Phoenix, Arizona. They use an interdisciplinary approach to lens-based media to interrogate boundaries and explore the body as a site of perception. Julie Anand is currently Associate Professor in the School of Art at Arizona State University and Damon Sauer serves as an Assistant Professor at the Art Institute of Pittsburgh—Online Division. Both received their MFA degrees in Photography from the University of New Mexico and began collaborating with each other in 2005.