Blue Sky Gallery

Location

122 NW 8th Ave
Portland
,
OR
97209
,
US

Website

Description

Free admission!

Future Events

Thursday
Jul
5
2018
Thursday, July 5, 2018 at noon through Sunday, July 29, 2018 at 5pm
noon through Sunday, July 29 at 5pm
Venue:
@
Blue Sky Gallery
“Borderlands, like textiles, are territories of exploration and zones in which we will be judged for our humanity.” In her photographic series BORDERLAND, Alia Ali uses portraiture to explore the liminal spaces surrounding human-made borders, which are often created as a result of conflict and violence. The portraits in the series feature textile artisans from eleven different regions wrapped in their own handiwork. Rendered anonymous and removed from their environmental and cultural contexts, these individuals become characters that the artist calls “–cludes.” As viewers we must decide how the subjects behind these fabrics will be included or excluded within our own unconscious and subjective categorizations. Ali writes, “We separate good from evil; familiar from unfamiliar; threat from safety; alien from native… We, influenced by categorizations create these dichotomies ourselves." Through this visual exercise, the artist asks us to consider: what are the fabricated barriers in society that inhibit the incorporation of others? Or are the obstacles just that: ideas, intuitions, fear, discriminations, and misunderstandings? Alia Ali (b. 1985, Austria) is a Yemeni-Bosnian-American multi-media artist. Having traveled to sixty-three countries, lived in seven, and grown up among five languages, her most comfortable mode of communication is through image and multi-sensory mediums. Ali is a graduate of the United World College of the Atlantic (UWCAC) and holds a BA in Studio Art and Middle Eastern Studies from Wellesley College. Her work has been featured at the Ogden Museum of Southern Art, the Marrakech Biennale as part of the Swiss-Moroccan KE’CH Collective, and Gulf Photo Plus Dubai during Art Week Dubai 2017. Her work has most recently been exhibited at the Peter Sillem Gallery (Germany), Galerie Siniya 28 (Morocco), Space Gallery (Maine, USA), Lianzhou Photo Festival (China), and Contemporary Art Center of New Orleans (USA). She has been awarded the Alice C. Cole '42 Grant of Wellesley College, LensCulture’s Emerging Talent Awards in 2016, and she was a Gold Winner in the Fine Art Category of the Tokyo International Foto Awards.
Thursday, July 5, 2018 at noon through Sunday, July 29, 2018 at 5pm
noon through Sunday, July 29 at 5pm
Venue:
@
Blue Sky Gallery
For the last thirteen years, Pedro David has been photographing commercial eucalyptus groves that are quickly replacing the natural forests throughout much of Brazil. Since the early 1900s, eucalyptus plantations have greatly diminished the biodiversity of the country’s forests, depleting the soil and consuming water and other vital resources at such a rapid pace that this phenomenon has become a global concern. In his Hardwood series, David photographs the rows of eucalyptus as they overtake the native Sucupira, Pequizeiro, Araticum, and Palo Tierra species, drawing viewers into these unnatural yet alluring landscapes. Pedro David (b. 1977, Brazil) completed his BA in journalism at the Pontifical Catholic University of Minas Gerais State in Belo Horizonte, Brazil and holds a graduate degree in contemporary fine arts from the Escola Guignard, Universidade do Estado de Minas Gerais in Brazil. He has published numerous books, including Underwater Landscape (2008); The Garden (2012); Route Root (2013); and Catharsis Phase (2014). His work is housed in the collections of the Musée du Quai Branly, Paris; the Museu de Arte Moderna de São Paulo, Brazil; the Museu Nacional da República, Brasília; and the Minas Gerais State Museum, Belo Horizonte, Brazil. Blue Sky exhibited David’s series 360 Square Meters in 2015 and the Hardwood series was recently exhibited at the Art Museum of the Americas in Washington, DC.

Past Events

Saturday
Jul
7
2018
Saturday, July 7, 2018 from 11am-5pm
11am-5pm
Venue:
@
Blue Sky Gallery
Which came first seeing or speaking? Just as people can verbalize their thoughts, they can visualize them, as well. But one must ask, what is the difference between looking and seeing? Can we do both, or do either take practice? What about imagination? Does it dull over time, or can our imaginations stay as vibrant as when we were children, if not more? How do we do that? What about memories, do they influence how we see things or how we imagine them? How does one communicate these experiences so that others can access them? In a two hour workshop, Alia Ali presents a platform for teachers, students, art enthusiasts and members of the community (14 and up) to explore image as a language. Ali conducts an interactive workshop on how to use light to transfer imagination into two dimensional artwork by engaging participants through discussions, brainstorming, sketching, and experimental activities. Individuals will leave the workshop feeling more enriched and confident in understanding image as a medium in which they can communicate their ideas, document their history, manifest expression, and hopefully, build an audience. Drawing from the work of photographers who have inspired, Alia Ali will also present experiences from her own portfolio of travel photography and fine/abstract art. MISSION: To challenge participants to think about image as a language, as tools and weapons. They will leave the workshop with a fresh perspective on “seeing” and “being seen”. “Borderlands, like textiles, are territories of exploration and zones in which we will be judged for our humanity.” In her photographic series BORDERLAND, Alia Ali uses portraiture to explore the liminal spaces surrounding human-made borders, which are often created as a result of conflict and violence. The portraits in the series feature textile artisans from eleven different regions wrapped in their own handiwork. Rendered anonymous and removed from their environmental and cultural contexts, these individuals become characters that the artist calls “–cludes.” As viewers we must decide how the subjects behind these fabrics will be included or excluded within our own unconscious and subjective categorizations. Ali writes, “We separate good from evil; familiar from unfamiliar; threat from safety; alien from native… We, influenced by categorizations create these dichotomies ourselves." Through this visual exercise, the artist asks us to consider: what are the fabricated barriers in society that inhibit the incorporation of others? Or are the obstacles just that: ideas, intuitions, fear, discriminations, and misunderstandings? Alia Ali (b. 1985, Austria) is a Yemeni-Bosnian-American multi-media artist. Having traveled to sixty-three countries, lived in seven, and grown up among five languages, her most comfortable mode of communication is through image and multi-sensory mediums. Ali is a graduate of the United World College of the Atlantic (UWCAC) and holds a BA in Studio Art and Middle Eastern Studies from Wellesley College. Her work has been featured at the Ogden Museum of Southern Art, the Marrakech Biennale as part of the Swiss-Moroccan KE’CH Collective, and Gulf Photo Plus Dubai during Art Week Dubai 2017. Her work has most recently been exhibited at the Peter Sillem Gallery (Germany), Galerie Siniya 28 (Morocco), Space Gallery (Maine, USA), Lianzhou Photo Festival (China), and Contemporary Art Center of New Orleans (USA). She has been awarded the Alice C. Cole '42 Grant of Wellesley College, LensCulture’s Emerging Talent Awards in 2016, and she was a Gold Winner in the Fine Art Category of the Tokyo International Foto Awards.
Thursday
Jul
5
2018
Thursday, July 5, 2018 from 5-6pm
5-6pm
Venue:
@
Blue Sky Gallery
Come join us as Alia Ali discusses her photo exhibition, BORDERLAND. “Borderlands, like textiles, are territories of exploration and zones in which we will be judged for our humanity.” In her photographic series BORDERLAND, Alia Ali uses portraiture to explore the liminal spaces surrounding human-made borders, which are often created as a result of conflict and violence. The portraits in the series feature textile artisans from eleven different regions wrapped in their own handiwork. Rendered anonymous and removed from their environmental and cultural contexts, these individuals become characters that the artist calls “–cludes.” As viewers we must decide how the subjects behind these fabrics will be included or excluded within our own unconscious and subjective categorizations. Ali writes, “We separate good from evil; familiar from unfamiliar; threat from safety; alien from native… We, influenced by categorizations create these dichotomies ourselves." Through this visual exercise, the artist asks us to consider: what are the fabricated barriers in society that inhibit the incorporation of others? Or are the obstacles just that: ideas, intuitions, fear, discriminations, and misunderstandings? Alia Ali (b. 1985, Austria) is a Yemeni-Bosnian-American multi-media artist. Having traveled to sixty-three countries, lived in seven, and grown up among five languages, her most comfortable mode of communication is through image and multi-sensory mediums. Ali is a graduate of the United World College of the Atlantic (UWCAC) and holds a BA in Studio Art and Middle Eastern Studies from Wellesley College. Her work has been featured at the Ogden Museum of Southern Art, the Marrakech Biennale as part of the Swiss-Moroccan KE’CH Collective, and Gulf Photo Plus Dubai during Art Week Dubai 2017. Her work has most recently been exhibited at the Peter Sillem Gallery (Germany), Galerie Siniya 28 (Morocco), Space Gallery (Maine, USA), Lianzhou Photo Festival (China), and Contemporary Art Center of New Orleans (USA). She has been awarded the Alice C. Cole '42 Grant of Wellesley College, LensCulture’s Emerging Talent Awards in 2016, and she was a Gold Winner in the Fine Art Category of the Tokyo International Foto Awards.
Thursday, July 5, 2018 at noon through Sunday, July 29, 2018 at 5pm
noon through Sunday, July 29 at 5pm
Venue:
@
Blue Sky Gallery
“Borderlands, like textiles, are territories of exploration and zones in which we will be judged for our humanity.” In her photographic series BORDERLAND, Alia Ali uses portraiture to explore the liminal spaces surrounding human-made borders, which are often created as a result of conflict and violence. The portraits in the series feature textile artisans from eleven different regions wrapped in their own handiwork. Rendered anonymous and removed from their environmental and cultural contexts, these individuals become characters that the artist calls “–cludes.” As viewers we must decide how the subjects behind these fabrics will be included or excluded within our own unconscious and subjective categorizations. Ali writes, “We separate good from evil; familiar from unfamiliar; threat from safety; alien from native… We, influenced by categorizations create these dichotomies ourselves." Through this visual exercise, the artist asks us to consider: what are the fabricated barriers in society that inhibit the incorporation of others? Or are the obstacles just that: ideas, intuitions, fear, discriminations, and misunderstandings? Alia Ali (b. 1985, Austria) is a Yemeni-Bosnian-American multi-media artist. Having traveled to sixty-three countries, lived in seven, and grown up among five languages, her most comfortable mode of communication is through image and multi-sensory mediums. Ali is a graduate of the United World College of the Atlantic (UWCAC) and holds a BA in Studio Art and Middle Eastern Studies from Wellesley College. Her work has been featured at the Ogden Museum of Southern Art, the Marrakech Biennale as part of the Swiss-Moroccan KE’CH Collective, and Gulf Photo Plus Dubai during Art Week Dubai 2017. Her work has most recently been exhibited at the Peter Sillem Gallery (Germany), Galerie Siniya 28 (Morocco), Space Gallery (Maine, USA), Lianzhou Photo Festival (China), and Contemporary Art Center of New Orleans (USA). She has been awarded the Alice C. Cole '42 Grant of Wellesley College, LensCulture’s Emerging Talent Awards in 2016, and she was a Gold Winner in the Fine Art Category of the Tokyo International Foto Awards.
Thursday, July 5, 2018 at noon through Sunday, July 29, 2018 at 5pm
noon through Sunday, July 29 at 5pm
Venue:
@
Blue Sky Gallery
For the last thirteen years, Pedro David has been photographing commercial eucalyptus groves that are quickly replacing the natural forests throughout much of Brazil. Since the early 1900s, eucalyptus plantations have greatly diminished the biodiversity of the country’s forests, depleting the soil and consuming water and other vital resources at such a rapid pace that this phenomenon has become a global concern. In his Hardwood series, David photographs the rows of eucalyptus as they overtake the native Sucupira, Pequizeiro, Araticum, and Palo Tierra species, drawing viewers into these unnatural yet alluring landscapes. Pedro David (b. 1977, Brazil) completed his BA in journalism at the Pontifical Catholic University of Minas Gerais State in Belo Horizonte, Brazil and holds a graduate degree in contemporary fine arts from the Escola Guignard, Universidade do Estado de Minas Gerais in Brazil. He has published numerous books, including Underwater Landscape (2008); The Garden (2012); Route Root (2013); and Catharsis Phase (2014). His work is housed in the collections of the Musée du Quai Branly, Paris; the Museu de Arte Moderna de São Paulo, Brazil; the Museu Nacional da República, Brasília; and the Minas Gerais State Museum, Belo Horizonte, Brazil. Blue Sky exhibited David’s series 360 Square Meters in 2015 and the Hardwood series was recently exhibited at the Art Museum of the Americas in Washington, DC.
Saturday
Jun
9
2018
Saturday, June 9, 2018 from 3-4pm
3-4pm
Venue:
@
Blue Sky Gallery
Join us as Cinthya Santos-Briones discusses her 2018 En Foco Fellowship Prize Exhibition, entitled Abuelas. Abuelas is a portrait series that honors the culture and experiences of Mexican immigrant women living in New York. Having come to the United States decades ago in search of opportunity for themselves and their families, these women are now the elders—the abuelas—in their communities. Although they are well established here, many have children and grandchildren living on both sides of the US-Mexico border and some must work unstable or exploitative low-wage jobs due to their immigration status. For these collaborative portraits, Cinthya Santos-Briones invites each sitter to choose where and how she would like to be photographed in her home in order to reflect each woman’s sense of self. The artist writes that "in these photographs, the homes´ decorations become part of the women's wider symbolic recreation of culture, memory, and ownership beyond borders.” Before becoming a documentary photographer, Santos-Briones studied anthropology and history, which led her to work as a researcher in institutions in Mexico focused on the study of indigenous and rural communities. Her work as a photographer is centered on community, migration, gender, identity, and the struggle for human rights. Santos-Briones is a recent graduate of the Visual Journalism And Documentary Practice Program at the International Center Of Photography in New York City. In the autumn of 2016 she received a fellowship granted by the Magnum Foundation.
Thursday
Jun
7
2018
Thursday, June 7, 2018 from 5-6pm
5-6pm
Venue:
@
Blue Sky Gallery
Come join us as Daesha Devón Harris discusses her 2018 En Foco Fellowship Prize Exhibition, entitled My Soul Has Grown Deep Like the Rivers. “This series is about the Black experience that is deeply connected to the landscape, the idea of home, and its intersections with water. Water becomes symbolic of Freedom, whether it is in this world or the next, and at the same time is evidence of social and cultural boundaries. Water has to be crossed on the journey to Freedom.” My Soul Has Grown Deep Like the Rivers is a series of portraits inspired by African American folklore, slave narratives, and Harlem Renaissance poetry. Through this work, Daesha Devón Harris examines current and historical racial ideologies in this country while highlighting Black Americans’ ongoing struggle for freedom. The artist begins her process with extensive research, which includes collecting stories, imagery, and other memorabilia. She then makes transparencies of vintage cartes de visite and cabinet card portraits she has collected and places them in water alongside rocks and flora to create aquatic still lifes. All of Harris’ work is photographed in her hometown of Saratoga Springs and the surrounding region at sites chosen for their personal or historical significance. The final prints are encased in wooden shadow boxes alongside small keepsakes and covered with etched glass, creating additional visual and narrative layers through which to view Harris's already complex photographic imagery. Daesha Devón Harris is a Saratoga Springs, New York native, artist, and photographer who has spent time in Buffalo, NY and San Francisco, CA. Both her multi-cultural family and the unexpected death of her young father have greatly shaped her life. She holds a BFA in Studio Art from the College Of Saint Rose and a MFA in Visual Art from The University at Buffalo. Harris has been featured in numerous exhibitions in New York State, Philadelphia, PA, Louisville, CO, and beyond.
Thursday, June 7, 2018 at noon through Sunday, July 1, 2018 at 5pm
noon through Sunday, July 1 at 5pm
Venue:
@
Blue Sky Gallery
This June 2018, photographers Cinthya Santos-Briones and Daesha Devón Harris will each present solo exhibitions at Blue Sky, the Oregon Center for the Photographic Arts, as the first winners of the En Foco Photography Fellowship Exhibition Prize at Blue Sky. The Exhibition Prize is a collaboration between the two organizations to increase visibility for En Foco and its Photography Fellows program and expand the diversity of artists shown at Blue Sky. Abuelas is a portrait series that honors the culture and experiences of Mexican immigrant women living in New York. Having come to the United States decades ago in search of opportunity for themselves and their families, these women are now the elders—the abuelas—in their communities. Although they are well established here, many have children and grandchildren living on both sides of the US-Mexico border and some must work unstable or exploitative low-wage jobs due to their immigration status. For these collaborative portraits, Cinthya Santos-Briones invites each sitter to choose where and how she would like to be photographed in her home in order to reflect each woman’s sense of self. The artist writes that "in these photographs, the homes´ decorations become part of the women's wider symbolic recreation of culture, memory, and ownership beyond borders.” Before becoming a documentary photographer, Santos-Briones studied anthropology and history, which led her to work as a researcher in institutions in Mexico focused on the study of indigenous and rural communities. Her work as a photographer is centered on community, migration, gender, identity, and the struggle for human rights. Santos-Briones is a recent graduate of the Visual Journalism And Documentary Practice Program at the International Center Of Photography in New York City. In the autumn of 2016 she received a fellowship granted by the Magnum Foundation.
Thursday, June 7, 2018 at noon through Sunday, July 1, 2018 at 5pm
noon through Sunday, July 1 at 5pm
Venue:
@
Blue Sky Gallery
This June 2018, photographers Cinthya Santos-Briones and Daesha Devón Harris will each present solo exhibitions at Blue Sky, the Oregon Center for the Photographic Arts, as the first winners of the En Foco Photography Fellowship Exhibition Prize at Blue Sky. The Exhibition Prize is a collaboration between the two organizations to increase visibility for En Foco and its Photography Fellows program and expand the diversity of artists shown at Blue Sky. “This series is about the Black experience that is deeply connected to the landscape, the idea of home, and its intersections with water. Water becomes symbolic of Freedom, whether it is in this world or the next, and at the same time is evidence of social and cultural boundaries. Water has to be crossed on the journey to Freedom.” My Soul Has Grown Deep Like the Rivers is a series of portraits inspired by African American folklore, slave narratives, and Harlem Renaissance poetry. Through this work, Daesha Devón Harris examines current and historical racial ideologies in this country while highlighting Black Americans’ ongoing struggle for freedom. The artist begins her process with extensive research, which includes collecting stories, imagery, and other memorabilia. She then makes transparencies of vintage cartes de visite and cabinet card portraits she has collected and places them in water alongside rocks and flora to create aquatic still lifes. All of Harris’ work is photographed in her hometown of Saratoga Springs and the surrounding region at sites chosen for their personal or historical significance. The final prints are encased in wooden shadow boxes alongside small keepsakes and covered with etched glass, creating additional visual and narrative layers through which to view Harris's already complex photographic imagery. Daesha Devón Harris is a Saratoga Springs, New York native, artist, and photographer who has spent time in Buffalo, NY and San Francisco, CA. Both her multi-cultural family and the unexpected death of her young father have greatly shaped her life. She holds a BFA in Studio Art from the College Of Saint Rose and a MFA in Visual Art from The University at Buffalo. Harris has been featured in numerous exhibitions in New York State, Philadelphia, PA, Louisville, CO, and beyond.
Saturday
Jun
2
2018
Saturday, June 2, 2018 from 3-4pm
3-4pm
Venue:
@
Blue Sky Gallery
Curated by Ashley Stull Meyers, Ultra Vivid Dreaming features photography and video work by two emerging artists that upends art historical legacies of portrait making and instead introduces contemporary studies of the body that are divorced from notions of "revealing". The two exhibiting photographers, Shikeith and Elliott Jerome Brown Jr., create images that are “ultra vivid” in color, composition, and focus on seemingly mundane environments with surreal undertones. The bodies pictured exist as if in a dream-state, where the subject's formal attributes and vulnerabilities are carefully considered by the photographer. While these works exist as contemporary representations of Black bodies and Queerness, they also critique the pervasive consumption of Black imagery and culture by an otherwise negligent audience. The subjects of the photos obstruct access to their identities and innermost selves through intentional postures that obscure full visibility, providing only a level of detail tangible in an ultra vivid dream. Dr. Derrais (pronounced like Paris) Carter is an assistant professor of Black Studies at Portland State University. His research interests include 20th century African American history, gender and sexuality studies, and black cultural studies.. He is currently writing Obscene Material, a book examining black girlhood and scandal in 1919 Washington, D.C. Elliott Jerome Brown Jr. (b. 1993) is a conceptual photographer based in Brooklyn, New York, whose work focuses on intimacy, vulnerability, and social perception. He graduated in 2016 with a BFA from New York University and recently finished a residency at Skowhegan School of Painting & Sculpture in Maine. His work has been exhibited in New York City, Baltimore, Philadelphia, Prague, and Michoacán, Mexico, where he also did a residency at RedLab Laboratorio de Gestión y Vinculación Cultural A.C. In addition to a visual practice, he is also the curator of DATE NIGHT, an interdisciplinary exhibition set in various homes. Shikeith (b. 1989) is a multi-disciplinary visual artist and filmmaker originally from Philadelphia, PA. He holds a BA from The Pennsylvania State University and he is a 2018 MFA candidate in the sculpture department of Yale School of Art in New Haven, Connecticut, where he currently lives. Shikeith’s public programs and group and solo exhibitions have been held at national and international venues such as the MAK Gallery in London; the Wright Museum of African American History in Detroit; MoMA, the Aperture Foundation, and the Vera List Center in New York City; Pittsburgh’s Kelly-Strayhorn Theatre; Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); Morehouse College in Atlanta; the Seattle Art Museum; and the Wrocław Contemporary Museum in Poland, among others. Shikeith's critically acclaimed documentary “#Blackmendream" (featured in this exhibition) was made possible by funding from multiple grants from The Pittsburgh Foundation and was named by the Tribeca Film Institute as one of ten films that capture the meaning of Black life in America. Shikeith is also the founder of Emerging Black Art. Ashley Stull Meyers is a writer, editor and curatorial collaborator. She has curated exhibitions and programming for the Wattis Institute (San Francisco), Eli Ridgway (San Francisco), the Oakland Museum of California, Newspace Center for Photography, Blue Sky Gallery, and Bridge Productions (Seattle, WA). She has been in academic residency at the Bemis Center for Contemporary Art (Omaha, NE) and the Banff Centre (Banff, Alberta). She is Northwest Editor for Art Practical, and has contributing writing to Bomb Magazine, Rhizome, Arts.Black and SFAQ/NYAQ. In 2017 Meyers was named the The Robert and Mercedes Eichholz Director and Curator of the Art Gym and Belluschi Pavilion.
Saturday
May
5
2018
Saturday, May 5, 2018 from 3-4pm
3-4pm
Venue:
@
Blue Sky Gallery
Curated by Ashley Stull Meyers, Ultra Vivid Dreaming features photography and video work by two emerging artists that upends art historical legacies of portrait making and instead introduces contemporary studies of the body that are divorced from notions of "revealing". The two exhibiting photographers, Shikeith and Elliott Jerome Brown Jr., create images that are “ultra vivid” in color, composition, and focus on seemingly mundane environments with surreal undertones. The bodies pictured exist as if in a dream-state, where the subject's formal attributes and vulnerabilities are carefully considered by the photographer. While these works exist as contemporary representations of Black bodies and Queerness, they also critique the pervasive consumption of Black imagery and culture by an otherwise negligent audience. The subjects of the photos obstruct access to their identities and innermost selves through intentional postures that obscure full visibility, providing only a level of detail tangible in an ultra vivid dream. Elliott Jerome Brown Jr. (b. 1993) is a conceptual photographer based in Brooklyn, New York, whose work focuses on intimacy, vulnerability, and social perception. He graduated in 2016 with a BFA from New York University and recently finished a residency at Skowhegan School of Painting & Sculpture in Maine. His work has been exhibited in New York City, Baltimore, Philadelphia, Prague, and Michoacán, Mexico, where he also did a residency at RedLab Laboratorio de Gestión y Vinculación Cultural A.C. In addition to a visual practice, he is also the curator of DATE NIGHT, an interdisciplinary exhibition set in various homes.