Portland City Hall

Location

1221 SW 4th Ave
Portland
,
OR
97204
,
US

Description

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Future Events

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Past Events

Wednesday
Apr
2
2014
Wednesday, April 2, 2014 from 11am-2pm
11am-2pm
Every Wednesday at Portland City Hall we will gather to fight for and demand a $15 per hour minimum wage! This Wednesday we will meet at 11 a.m. Economist and PSU Professor Robin, Hahnel, expert scholar on participatory economics will speaking. Micaiah Dutt from Portland Socialist Alternative will also speak, and Sonya Friedman, a PSU student will discuss student debt, the upcoming PSU faculty strike, and how they relate to the living wage. SeaTac passed a $15 per hour living minimum wage last year. Yesterday 87% of voters in Chicago approved an advisory referendum to raise the minimum wage to $15. A mayor and councilwoman are moving Seattle toward a $15 per hour living minimum wage. And with the recent $15 Now March and the recent press conference announcing the candidacy of Nicholas Caleb for Portland City Council the push for a $15 per hour living minimum wage began here in Portland, OR, as supporters held signs in front of City Hall that read "15 Now." With all this momentum already being gathered, now is the time for the people of Portland come together to begin a sustained, bottom up push for a $15 per hour living minimum wage. Now is the time to take to the streets and City Hall to pressure the City Council to act for the betterment of businesses, workers, and all the residents of the City of Portland. In solidarity with the growing Moral Mondays movement in the South where approximately 1,000 people have been arrested in North Carolina and Georgia over the past year by engaging in civil disobedience against their state and local governments' draconian economic and social agendas, we will converge on Portland City Hall every Wednesday for "Living Wage Wednesdays." We'll crowd out and surround the building during the Wednesday morning council meetings to shout and sing and chant the message that the people of Portland demand a wage we can live on! A living minimum wage of $15 per hour will benefit the whole city. Workers with low wage jobs will suddenly be able to support themselves and their families. Their increase in income will mean an increase in ability to spend money that will benefit businesses and the city by adding a boost to our struggling economy. With more people making a wage they can live on, fewer people in the city will have to rely on food stamps and other government assistance programs, which will take strain off of the city budget. Raising the minimum wage to a living $15 per wage is good for the City of Portland. Come out wearing the color red, and join us every this and every Wednesday as we demand this a $15 livable minimum wage from our City Council! Living Wage Wednesday is organized by the Portland Committee For $15 Now, Endorsed by Portland Socialist Alternative, Individuals for Justice, and Cascadian Neighborhood Farm Guild. **If your group would like to endorse this event and become one of our coalition partners, please contact us at info@15nowpdx.org http://www.facebook.com/events/531042433679198/
Wednesday
Mar
26
2014
Wednesday, March 26, 2014 from 9-11am
9-11am
SeaTac passed a $15 per hour living minimum wage last year. Yesterday 87% of voters in Chicago approved an advisory referendum to raise the minimum wage to $15. A mayor and councilwoman are moving Seattle toward a $15 per hour living minimum wage. And with the recent $15 Now March and the recent press conference announcing the candidacy of Nicholas Caleb for Portland City Council the push for a $15 per hour living minimum wage began here in Portland, OR, as supporters held signs in front of City Hall that read "15 Now." With all this momentum already being gathered, now is the time for the people of Portland come together to begin a sustained, bottom up push for a $15 per hour living minimum wage. Now is the time to take to the streets and City Hall to pressure the City Council to act for the betterment of businesses, workers, and all the residents of the City of Portland. In solidarity with the growing Moral Mondays movement in the South where approximately 1,000 people have been arrested in North Carolina and Georgia over the past year by engaging in civil disobedience against their state and local governments' draconian economic and social agendas, we will converge on Portland City Hall every Wednesday for "Living Wage Wednesdays." We'll crowd out and surround the building during the Wednesday morning council meetings to shout and sing and chant the message that the people of Portland demand a wage we can live on! A living minimum wage of $15 per hour will benefit the whole city. Workers with low wage jobs will suddenly be able to support themselves and their families. Their increase in income will mean an increase in ability to spend money that will benefit businesses and the city by adding a boost to our struggling economy. With more people making a wage they can live on, fewer people in the city will have to rely on food stamps and other government assistance programs, which will take strain off of the city budget. Raising the minimum wage to a living $15 per wage is good for the City of Portland. Come out wearing the color red, and join us every this and every Wednesday as we demand this a $15 livable minimum wage from our City Council! http://www.facebook.com/events/531042433679198/
Wednesday
Nov
6
2013
Wednesday, November 6, 2013 at 8am through Thursday, November 7, 2013 at 11am
8am through Thursday, November 7 at 11am
On November 6th, our "Six Point Plan B" will be will be delivered to the Portland City Council and Mayor Charlie Hales. "Plan B" is another "Six Point Plan" that includes ways in which we start to fight back against our corporate run government. As a preview, part of this plan will include a recall election of one City Council member, countless lawsuits against not just Portland City government, Portland Police and many of its branches, it will include the Portland Business Alliance and it's members. We call this the 10,000 Lawsuit Project. Another part of this plan will be to call out to the nation and the world to come to Portland this fall and winter to help us protest on the streets of Portland, the disgusting and evil practices of a hateful, corporate sponsored "Camping Ban" propagated by their political puppets. Below is the working draft of the "6-Point Plan." Read for yourself and ADD YOUR FEEDBACK. To all concerned parties, There are 17,000 homeless people in Portland, not 1,700. Homeward Bound, otherwise known as the "10 Year Plan To End Homelessness" has failed. Non-profit corporations that were paid to put themselves out of business, could not bring themselves to do so. Tens of millions have been squandered on new buildings that temporarily help few, while real solutions are offered at no charge to the public and are quickly put to an end by City government or members of the homeless industry. One case that immediately comes to mind is Right 2 Dream Too. This small "camp" hosts up to 80 individuals nightly at no cost to the city. This "camp" has saved Portland tax payers millions of dollars in emergency room visits, legal costs, etc. More importantly, it saved lives. Unfortunately, R2DToo is fined over $1200/month because no good deed can go unpunished. Another case in point would be the new "Bud Clark Commons" Building. At it's initial cost of $40 million, there could be housing for 2,750 individuals in self sustainable, community supportive "Eco-Villages." Bud Clark no longer allows showers or laundry past 2:00pm due to budget cuts. While some may wish to stay on the street indefinitely, most do not. The public typically will see the "chronically homeless man" and think that that is the face of homelessness. Most do not see the family living in a van or the women that just lost her home to foreclosure, sleeping on her daughters couch. This segment of homeless do not want to be seen but they do want to be helped. We all need to ask ourselves, what would I do if that was my sister or my brother? Would you care enough to get involved then? With the help of the homeless community, homeless advocates and the general public, this document was formed. You will find within this document, some of the answers to the issue of homelessness. Here are some ideas to ponder: 1. Eco-Villages Small communities that are self sustaining already exist in Portland, Oregon, successfully. Homeless advocates have been working hard to bring their plans to fruition, lacking only the support of our city government and members of the homeless industry. These Eco-Villages are our least expensive and most favorable option for a long term solution. 2. Americorp Relief Camps Americorp comes in after natural disasters to bring immediate relief and temporary housing. Federally funded and volunteer run. Relief camps would offer all of the things that you would expect including lodging, meals, laundry, storage, employment assistance, educational assistance, counseling, ect. etc. Those staying at a relief effort would have a case worker that would actively participate in securing the needs of client, with the end goal of permanent housing. I would like to remind everyone that Americorp is a Federal program and the Federal Government should by all means, be utilized whenever possible for it's vast amount of resources. 3. Rest Stations A "Rest Station" is a place in which one would erect a tent in which to sleep, from dusk till dawn. While at a Rest Station one would not be allowed to consume alcohol or drugs. One would not be allowed to roam or visit with others. One would be there to sleep and only to sleep. Rest Stations could be located throughout the city in "Low Key" areas so as not to disturb residents or business. Rest Stations would be monitored by security officers. 4. Existing Buildings City or privately owned buildings could be transformed into housing using volunteers and donated building materials. Millions of tax dollars would be saved on construction costs. 5. Campgrounds City or privately owned land could be leased and a permit to operate a campground could be granted. A fee could be charged to residents that would cover costs including security. Dodge Park is a camp ground operated by Portland Parks and is closed to the public between October and May. This park should be made available to a responsible entity that can guarantee that the park will remain in its pristine state and that this camp be a safe, clean and cooperative environment. 6. Day Centers A "Day Center" would serve the immediate needs of a person experiencing homelessness by providing vital services that one would need to be able to become gainfully employed. One would have the ability to shower, store their belongings and be assisted with job searches. Another service that would be offered at a "Day Center" would be Education. Volunteers would assist with enrolling those desiring a GED, collage courses and vocational training through Pell Grants and all other types of financial assistance. Business training. Many that are unable to work for various reasons should be assisted in producing goods or services that could be sold in the open market. Note: The only free storage, shower and laundry service available near the downtown area is "Bud Clark Commons". Day storage is limited to very small number of very small lockers that hold the equivalent of a large sleeping bag, very insignificant to what is needed if one were to need to store a large backpack and sleeping gear, rendering those lockers of no use to one seeking employment or currently employed. Currently, the procedure to shower or do laundry is that you be in line at 7:00 am. If one is fortunate enough to get a shower and clean a load of laundry, it takes several hours to accomplish. At present, the laundry is open until 2:00pm with a limit of one load per week and the showers close at 1:30pm. You can do laundry between 2-5pm if you have cash. Two washing machines are currently working at "Bud Clark Commons". http://www.facebook.com/events/414790371974468/
Monday
Oct
28
2013
Monday, October 28, 2013 from 3-6pm
3-6pm
On October 28th, City Council is going to approve 1.6 million in emergency funding to go to the same homeless industry that has failed our city for the last nine years of the ten year plan, unless we stop them! Here are some ideas to ponder: 1. Eco-Villages Small communities that are self sustaining already exist in Portland, Oregon, successfully. Homeless advocates have been working hard to bring their plans to fruition, lacking only the support of our city government and members of the homeless industry. These Eco-Villages are our least expensive and most favorable option for a long term solutions. A community that is based on mutual respect and sharing their talents and their time. 2. Americorp Relief Camps Americorp comes in after natural disasters to bring immediate relief and temporary housing. Federally funded and volunteer run. Relief camps would offer all of the things that you would expect including lodging, meals, laundry, storage, employment assistance, educational assistance, counseling, etc. Those staying at a relief effort would have a case worker that would actively participate in securing the needs of client, with the end goal of permanent housing. I would like to remind everyone that Americorp is a Federal program and the Federal Government should by all means, be utilized whenever possible for it's vast amount of resources. 3. Rest Stations A "Rest Station" is a place in which one would erect a tent in which to sleep, from dusk till dawn. While at a Rest Station one would not be allowed to consume alcohol or drugs. One would not be allowed to roam or visit with others. One would be there to sleep and only to sleep. Rest Stations could be located throughout the city in "Low Key" areas so as not to disturb residents or business. Rest Stations would be monitored by security officers. 4. Existing Buildings City or privately owned buildings could be transformed into housing using volunteers and donated building materials. Millions of tax dollars would be saved on construction costs. Schools are one good example of how we can utilize spaces that we already own. As of June 2012, 9 school buildings were closed in Portland, allowing city control on that property. For of these buildings are on the open market, two are being leased and 5. Campgrounds City or privately owned land could be leased and a permit to operate a campground could be granted. A fee could be charged to residents that would cover costs including security. Dodge Park is a camp ground operated by Portland Parks and is closed to the public between October and May. This park should be made available to a responsible entity that can guarantee that the park will remain in its pristine state and that this camp be a safe, clean and cooperative environment. 6. Day Centers A "Day Center" would serve the immediate needs of a person experiencing homelessness by providing vital services that one would need to be able to become gainfully employed. One would have the ability to shower, store their belongings and be assisted with job searches. Another service that would be offered at a "Day Center" would be Education. Volunteers would assist with enrolling those desiring a GED, collage courses and vocational training through Pell Grants and all other types of financial assistance. Business training. Many that are unable to work for various reasons should be assisted in producing goods or services that could be sold in the open market. An emphasis of employment, education and entrepreneurship would be placed on all of these programs. http://www.facebook.com/events/414790371974468/
Thursday
Oct
10
2013
Thursday, October 10, 2013 from 5:30-7:30pm
5:30-7:30pm
Join us at Portland City Hall to celebrate the winners of the 2013 Bike Commute Challenge. Everyone who participated in the Challenge gets in for free! Become a BTA Member at the Awards Party and you'll get a free Bike Commute Challenge pint glass. Pint glasses are also available for purchase, and you'll have one more shot at getting a 2013 Challenge t-shirt! It's not too late to sign up. Register for the Bike Commute Challenge today and get into the party for free. http://bikecommutechallenge.com http://www.facebook.com/events/494379170659033/
Friday
Oct
4
2013
Friday, October 4, 2013 at midnight through Saturday, October 5, 2013 at midnight
midnight through Saturday, October 5 at midnight
Mayor Hale's has put together a group of people that are pivotal in the effort to end homelessness in Portland, including 4 members of the homeless community. A meeting in the mayors conference room is ischeduled for Friday, October 4th. We will be discussing our "Six Point Plan" as well as other ideas from the group. While we remain cautiously optimistic, we have good reason for hope due to the lifting of the fines for R2D2 as well as the city's assistance in finding them a new home in the downtown area. Below is the working draft of the "6-Point Plan." Read for yourself and ADD YOUR FEEDBACK. To all concerned parties, There are 17,000 homeless people in Portland, not 1,700. Homeward Bound, otherwise known as the "10 Year Plan To End Homelessness" has failed. Non-profit corporations that were paid to put themselves out of business, could not bring themselves to do so. Tens of millions have been squandered on new buildings that temporarily help few, while real solutions are offered at no charge to the public and are quickly put to an end by City government or members of the homeless industry. One case that immediately comes to mind is Right 2 Dream Too. This small "camp" hosts up to 80 individuals nightly at no cost to the city. This "camp" has saved Portland tax payers millions of dollars in emergency room visits, legal costs, etc. More importantly, it saved lives. Unfortunately, R2DToo is fined over $1200/month because no good deed can go unpunished. Another case in point would be the new "Bud Clark Commons" Building. At it's initial cost of $40 million, there could be housing for 2,750 individuals in self sustainable, community supportive "Eco-Villages." Bud Clark no longer allows showers or laundry past 2:00pm due to budget cuts. While some may wish to stay on the street indefinitely, most do not. The public typically will see the "chronically homeless man" and think that that is the face of homelessness. Most do not see the family living in a van or the women that just lost her home to foreclosure, sleeping on her daughters couch. This segment of homeless do not want to be seen but they do want to be helped. We all need to ask ourselves, what would I do if that was my sister or my brother? Would you care enough to get involved then? With the help of the homeless community, homeless advocates and the general public, this document was formed. You will find within this document, some of the answers to the issue of homelessness. Here are some ideas to ponder: 1. Eco-Villages Small communities that are self sustaining already exist in Portland, Oregon, successfully. Homeless advocates have been working hard to bring their plans to fruition, lacking only the support of our city government and members of the homeless industry. These Eco-Villages are our least expensive and most favorable option for a long term solution. 2. Americorp Relief Camps Americorp comes in after natural disasters to bring immediate relief and temporary housing. Federally funded and volunteer run, this option would save tax payers millions of dollars in emergency room visits, legal costs, etc. 3. Rest Stations A "Rest Station" is a place in which one would erect a tent in which to sleep, from dusk till dawn. While at a Rest Station one would not be allowed to consume alcohol or drugs. One would not be allowed to roam or visit with others. One would be there to sleep and only to sleep. Rest Stations could be located throughout the city in "Low Key" areas so as not to disturb residents or business. Rest Stations would be monitored by security officers. 4. Existing Buildings City or privately owned buildings could be transformed into housing using volunteers and donated building materials. Millions of tax dollars would be saved on construction costs. 5. Campgrounds City or privately owned land could be leased and a permit to operate a campground could be granted. A fee could be charged to residents that would cover costs including security. Dodge Park is a camp ground operated by Portland Parks and is closed to the public between October and May. This park should be made available to a responsible entity that can guarantee that the park will remain in its pristine state and that this camp be a safe, clean and cooperative environment. 6. Day Centers A "Day Center" would serve the immediate needs of a person experiencing homelessness by providing vital services that one would need to be able to become gainfully employed. One would have the ability to shower, store their belongings and be assisted with job searches. Another service that would be offered at a "Day Center" would be Education. Volunteers would assist with enrolling those desiring a GED, collage courses and vocational training through Pell Grants and all other types of financial assistance. Note: The only free storage, shower and laundry service available near the downtown area is "Bud Clark Commons". Day storage is limited to very small number of very small lockers that hold the equilivent of a large sleeping bag, very insignificant to what is needed if one were to need to store a large backpack and sleeping gear, rendering those lockers of no use to one seeking employment or currently employed. Currently, the procedure to shower or do laundry is that you be in line at 7:00 am. If one is fortunate enough to get a shower and clean a load of laundry, it takes several hours to accomplish. At present, the laundry is open until 2:00pm with a limit of one load per week and the showers close at 1:30pm. You can do laundry between 2-5pm if you have cash. Two washing machines are currently working at "Bud Clark Commons". http://www.facebook.com/events/414790371974468/
Thursday
Sep
19
2013
Thursday, September 19, 2013 from noon-3pm
noon-3pm
Presented by Michael Andersen, News editor, BikePortland.org; Editor, The Green Lane Project blog (greenlaneproject.org/blog) Portland didn't just show the country that bike-friendliness was possible in a big U.S. city -- it showed the country that bike-friendly media are essential to biking's growth. Following up on the Green Lane Project's Sept. 16-18 summit in Portland, Michael Andersen will share the latest practices from Seattle, San Diego, Saint Louis and other cities where independent journalists are following BikePortland's lead (and discovering new tricks of their own). http://www.facebook.com/events/206648189511627/
Friday
Sep
13
2013
Friday, September 13, 2013 from 12:30-2pm
12:30-2pm
Friday the 13th will be an unlucky day for Portland. A lot of recent changes have hit Portland City Hall, free speech activists and a protest vigil were pushed away, food carts have popped in and out, and the fencing off of public parks. There is a growing concern that Portland citizens are losing political access to City Hall. One of the hardest working, most caring human beings will soon be out of a job. Cindy Williams is the prime example of a public servant, making City Hall a safer place for you and other Portlanders to express themselves and get to work. For over 7 years, Cindy has handled conflicts, provided services for the poor and unfortunate, and started every conversation off with a smile. Cindy William's work has been so inspiring, that the Oregonian even wrote a piece about her: http://www.oregonlive.com/portland/index.ssf/2012/10/a_shivering_homeless_woman_a_c.html We do not want to see Cindy Williams get fired. Not only will Portland be losing one of its best safety responders, but City Hall will become a less accessible space for citizen groups, who will have to spend extra to provide security guards at community events. When I first thought about doing something to celebrate Cindy, I didn't think it would be that big of a deal to many people. Since pitching the idea to others, I have heard amazing stories about the tiny little ways that Cindy has touched countless lives. So, we are showing our appreciation for Cindy Williams by throwing her a going away party. It will be outside of City Hall, where she has diligently worked for 5 years. There will be food, music, and other surprises. If you can, please contribute to the Appreciation Fund we set up for Cindy Williams. 1,600 dollars will give her a month's worth of a bonus, anything we raise over that will go to benefit Right 2 Dream Too, which has reached a critical point in their advocacy to end houselessness. http://www.indiegogo.com/projects/free-burritos-fight-homelessness-save-cindy/x/4541721 We hope this demonstration will inspire you to take action. Please contribute to help Cindy and Right 2 Dream Too, and ask your City Officials to have an open dialogue about how we envision an accessible City Hall to be. http://www.facebook.com/events/546268718743714/
Wednesday
Sep
4
2013
Wednesday, September 4, 2013 from 9:30am-12:30pm
9:30am-12:30pm
JOIN US for the community-led presentation to the Mayor and City Council for real, bottom-up, alternative solutions to end homelessness in Portland. Members of the City Hall Vigil and other local community groups will be in attendance. Below is the working draft of the "6-Point Plan." Read for yourself and ADD YOUR FEEDBACK. To all concerned parties, There are 17,000 homeless people in Portland, not 1,700. Homeward Bound, otherwise known as the "10 Year Plan To End Homelessness" has failed. Non-profit corporations that were paid to put themselves out of business, could not bring themselves to do so. Tens of millions have been squandered on new buildings that temporarily help few, while real solutions are offered at no charge to the public and are quickly put to an end by City government or members of the homeless industry. One case that immediately comes to mind is Right 2 Dream Too. This small "camp" hosts up to 80 individuals nightly at no cost to the city. This "camp" has saved Portland tax payers millions of dollars in emergency room visits, legal costs, etc. More importantly, it saved lives. Unfortunately, R2DToo is fined over $1200/month because no good deed can go unpunished. Another case in point would be the new "Bud Clark Commons" Building. At it's initial cost of $40 million, there could be housing for 2,750 individuals in self sustainable, community supportive "Eco-Villages." Bud Clark no longer allows showers or laundry past 2:00pm due to budget cuts. While some may wish to stay on the street indefinitely, most do not. The public typically will see the "chronically homeless man" and think that that is the face of homelessness. Most do not see the family living in a van or the women that just lost her home to foreclosure, sleeping on her daughters couch. This segment of homeless do not want to be seen but they do want to be helped. We all need to ask ourselves, what would I do if that was my sister or my brother? Would you care enough to get involved then? With the help of the homeless community, homeless advocates and the general public, this document was formed. You will find within this document, some of the answers to the issue of homelessness. Here are some ideas to ponder: 1. Eco-Villages Small communities that are self sustaining already exist in Portland, Oregon, successfully. Homeless advocates have been working hard to bring their plans to fruition, lacking only the support of our city government and members of the homeless industry. These Eco-Villages are our least expensive and most favorable option for a long term solution. 2. Americorp Relief Camps Americorp comes in after natural disasters to bring immediate relief and temporary housing. Federally funded and volunteer run, this option would save tax payers millions of dollars in emergency room visits, legal costs, etc. 3. Rest Stations A "Rest Station" is a place in which one would erect a tent in which to sleep, from dusk till dawn. While at a Rest Station one would not be allowed to consume alcohol or drugs. One would not be allowed to roam or visit with others. One would be there to sleep and only to sleep. Rest Stations could be located throughout the city in "Low Key" areas so as not to disturb residents or business. Rest Stations would be monitored by security officers. 4. Existing Buildings City or privately owned buildings could be transformed into housing using volunteers and donated building materials. Millions of tax dollars would be saved on construction costs. 5. Leased Campgrounds City or privately owned land could be leased and a permit to operate a campground could be granted. A fee could be charged to residents that would cover costs including security. 6. Existing Campgrounds Dodge Park is a camp ground operated by Portland Parks and is closed to the public between October and May. This park should be made available to a responsible entity that can guarantee that the park will remain in its pristine state and that this camp be a safe, clean and cooperative environment. http://www.facebook.com/events/414790371974468/
Monday
Aug
26
2013
Monday, August 26, 2013 from 11am-1pm
11am-1pm
Starting August 26th, free burritos will be given out from 11am to 1pm every Monday through Friday. It is not our mission to make food carts outside of City Hall unprofitable. We plan to raise money, some to benefit Cindy Williams, a widely acclaimed security guard who makes less than 2,000 a month and will soon be out of a job. Some of it will be shared with Tomas, the food cart owner who is caught the middle of an unfortunate political situation. Some of it will be dedicated to sustaining much needed homeless advocacy. Please follow this link to leave an online contribution: http://www.indiegogo.com/projects/free-burritos-fight-homelessness-save-cindy Still, free burritos are awesome! They are also an important political statement. There is a growing concern about Portland citizens losing political access to City Hall. It’s ironic. A whole year after my hunger strike to bring awareness to homelessness, I make a return to City Hall to give away food for an eerily similar cause. It’s also a bit tragic, as the great strides we have made in having a fair and open approach to homelessness are currently in jeopardy. After an almost two year long demonstration outside of City Hall, the sidewalks were cleared of homeless rights activists, with claims that it would make City Hall more accessible to the general public. Next month, funding for G4S Security workers will be cut from City Hall. If a citizen group wants to reserve the People’s Building for an event, they will have to add the cost of hiring private security. This does not make City Hall more accessible. Our progressive record was further damaged, as negative language about homelessness was tossed around to the media. With limited public dialogue, downtown was labeled as a magnet for lawless criminals, a.ka. the homeless. It was a return to the knee-jerk stereotype, equating people who sleep on the streets as a threat to public security. This prompted an expansive crackdown on homeless camps, which not only cost us our morality, but became an extremely expensive drain of public safety resources. New funding priorities have been questionable, as a few thousand dollars were spent to purchase a table set to compliment the food carts that some City Hall insiders want to replace the vigil that was a symbol of free speech and protest. These are not results of forward thinking policies; it only endangers our progress as a community to proactively engage in addressing homelessness. We would like to see Mayor Hales reconsider this approach that practically criminalizes homelessness, so that our community can have a larger discussion about how to best utilize our efforts and fulfill our commitment to the public. We hope this demonstration will inspire you to take action. Join us for a free burrito, donate money to help Cindy, Tomas, and the homeless, and ask your City Officials to have an open dialogue about how we envision an accessible City Hall to look like. http://www.facebook.com/events/500024366752720/