PSU, Smith Memorial Student Union Rm 236

Location

1825 SW Broadway,
Portland
,
OR
97203
,
US

Website

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Future Events

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Past Events

Friday
May
23
2014
Friday, May 23, 2014 from 1-3pm
1-3pm
Dr. Landis will discuss the rise of ethnic and religious identities in the Levant states following WWI in an effort to explain how Syria fits into a larger model of nation building in post-imperial lands. He will discuss possible outcomes of the Syrian struggle and consider how they may impact the states of the region.
Thursday
Jan
23
2014
Thursday, January 23, 2014 from 7-8:30pm
7-8:30pm
Precis A play on the title of Lila Abu-Lughod’s important 2002 essay, ‘Do Muslim Women Really Need Saving?’, this talk explores questions that emerged when colleagues from the Rock ‘n’ Roll Camp for Girls in Portland traveled to Bahrain in August, 2013. Invited by the U.S. Embassy to do cultural outreach, they put on a modified version of the girls’ empowerment camp founded in Portland, Oregon. The project included a component of cross-cultural zine-making and video exchange with a group of girls in Portland. This collaborative discussion will outline the socio-political context for girls’ empowerment programs in the Gulf, the particular situation in Bahrain, and how a program with a western-style girls’ empowerment message was modified and adapted by the organizers and the girls themselves over the course of the camp. Featuring film clips, photographs and images created by the girls, this presentation explores one site of radical differences and unlikely similarities, contextualizing larger theoretical issues of transnational girlhood and girl-lead social change. The talk is designed to engage the audience in discussion, and provides plenty of openings for questions and answers. Biographies Nadia Buyse is a trans-disciplinary performance artist, musician, and cultural activist living in Portland. She has been in at least 30 bands she can remember. She has toured the United States and Europe, playing in a range of spaces from music festivals, punk clubs, house shows, and discotheques. She has also exhibited work internationally and nationally, including the MDW Art Fair in Chicago, Beta Spaces in New York, dOCUMENTA (13), and ART STAYS in Ptuj, Slovenia. Sarah Dougher is an educator, writer and musician from Portland, Oregon. In summer 2013, she taught teenage girls music in Bahrain under the auspices of the Rock ‘n’ Roll Camp for Girls, where she is a frequent volunteer teacher and consultant. She currently teaches on popular music cultures and girls’ studies at Portland State University, and is writing a book about tweens and music with colleague Diane Pecknold. Beth Wooten is Executive Director of Rock 'n' Roll Camp for Girls, and has volunteered at Willie Mae Rock Camp in Brooklyn, NYC as well as Girls Rock Charleston, SC. She is a graduate of the University of Oregon School of Law, where she worked at their Domestic Violence legal aid, and researched contractual and copyright issues facing Girl Group era female musicians. Sponsors Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies (WGSS) is an interdisciplinary program designed to foster students’ personal and intellectual development in the study of gender and sexuality within both local and global contexts; the intersectional analysis of race, gender, class, culture and disability; power, systems of privilege, and resistance; and the links between theoretical understandings of feminist/queer studies and community activism. A degree in WGSS prepares students for socially responsible community involvement and a broad range of careers in community agencies, not-for-profit organizations, and government agencies. Additionally, the WGSS program offers a foundation for graduate work in professional degree programs such as teaching, counseling, social work, legal studies, public health, business administration, and advocacy. pdx.edu/ws/ | wgss@pdx.edu | 725-3516 The Middle East Studies Center at Portland State University promotes understanding of the people, cultures, languages and religions of the Middle East. As a National Resource Center for Middle East Studies under the U.S. Department of Education's Title VI program, the Center serves as a resource on issues pertaining to the Middle East through activities that reach students and scholars, as well as businesses, educators, and the media. The Middle East Studies Center supports academic conferences, workshops, cultural events, lectures, and a resource library. pdx.edu/middle-east-studies | middleeaststudiescenter@pdx.edu | 503-725-4074
Thursday
Jan
16
2014
Thursday, January 16, 2014 from 7:30-9pm
7:30-9pm
Abstract The tomb chapel of Menna (TT 69) on the West Bank of the Nile at Luxor is one of the ancient Egypt’s finest painted tombs. In the 18th Dynasty, Menna held the high position of “Scribe of the Fields of the Lord of the Two Lands of Upper and Lower Egypt.” The colorful tomb depicts the private lives of Menna and his family, natural settings of flora, birds, and plants, his role overseeing ancient Egypt’s agriculture and granaries, as well as classic scenes of worship, offerings and funeral rites. Constant tourist visitation has taken a toll on the interior of the tomb. From 2007-2010, Dr Melinda Hartwig directed a team to fully document the tomb and design a plan for conservation and protection, using extensive, non-invasive procedures. Dr Hartwig will explain the methods and results from that archaeological project as well as discuss Menna, the times in which he lived, and the artistic methods and materials used in his tomb chapel. Biography Dr Hartwig teaches Ancient Egyptian and Near Eastern Art History at Georgia State University. She holds an M.A. in Near Eastern Studies from the University of California-Berkeley as well as an M.A. in Art History & Archaeology and a Ph. D. in Near Eastern Art & Archaeology from the Institute of Fine Arts, New York University. She edited the recently published book, The Tomb Chapel of Menna (Theban Tomb 69): The Art, Culture and Science of Painting in an Egyptian Tomb, ARCE Conservation Series 5, which documents the ARCE/Georgia State University/USAID project described by her lecture. Sponors The Oregon Chapter of the American Research Center in Egypt is a private, nonprofit organization that supports research on all aspects of Egyptian history and culture, fosters broader knowledge among the general public, and strengthens American-Egyptian cultural ties. The Middle East Studies Center at Portland State University promotes understanding of the people, cultures, languages and religions of the Middle East. As a National Resource Center for Middle East Studies under the U.S. Department of Education's Title VI program, the Center serves as a resource on issues pertaining to the Middle East through activities that reach students and scholars, as well as businesses, educators, and the media. The Middle East Studies Center supports academic conferences, workshops, cultural events, lectures, and a resource library.
Friday
Oct
11
2013
Friday, October 11, 2013 from 8:30am-5:30pm
8:30am-5:30pm
Keynote Speaker: Dr. Adewale Troutman Dr. Adewale Troutman is a physician, a professor, and the president of theAmerican Public Health Association. Dr. Troutman’s life’s work has been committed to social justice, human rights, community activism, health equity and national and global health. Over his 40 years of work, he founded the first Center for Health Equity, instigated the creation of the Mayors Healthy Hometown Movement, and was credited with the passage of one of the strongest anti-smoking ordinances in the county. Dr. Troutman was featured in the nationally televised PBS series, “Unnatural Causes: Is Inequality Making Us Sick?” and has multiple publications including “What if We Were Equal”, an analysis of the black-white mortality gap in the U. S. that was co-authored with former Surgeon General and Assistant Secretary of Health, Dr. David Satcher.
Tuesday
Sep
17
2013
Tuesday, September 17, 2013 from 7-10pm
7-10pm
Against the chaotic backdrop of ongoing war and conflict in the Middle East and rising fears of terrorism in the West, the makers of the critically-acclaimed documentaries Peace, Propaganda, and the Promised Land and Edward Said: On Orientalism have produced a powerful and important new film based on Jack Shaheen’s bestselling book, Reel Bad Arabs: How Hollywood Vilifies a People. Reel Bad Arabs takes a devastating tour of the American cinematic landscape, moving from the earliest days of silent film to today’s biggest Hollywood blockbusters to reveal an astonishing pattern of slanderous Arab stereotyping. The documentary isolates and examines America’s most persistent Arab caricatures, from oversexed Bedouin bandits and submissive maidens to sinister sheikhs and blood-thirsty terrorists, providing striking insights into the origin of these images, their disturbing similarities to anti-Semitic and other racist and ethnocentrist stereotypes, and their resurgence and political resonance during key moments of crisis in U.S. history. By inspiring us to reflect critically on the social and political consequences of Hollywood’s long love affair with Arab villainy and buffoonery, Reel Bad Arabs challenges us in the end to envision counter-narratives that do justice to the complexity and humanity of Arab people, and the reality and richness of Arab history and culture.