Taborspace, 5441 SE Belmont St, Portland, OR 97215, USA

Location

5441 SE Belmont St
Portland
,
OR
97215
,
US

Description

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Future Events

- No events -

Past Events

Saturday
Oct
21
2017
Saturday, October 21, 2017 from 11am-noon
11am-noon
Suported and sponsored by The RLS Foundation, based in Texas. This is a free support group, all who suffer RLS or PLM (periodic limb disorder) and their support people are welcome!
Tuesday
Jan
31
2017
Tuesday, January 31, 2017 from 7-8:30pm
7-8:30pm
From Pioneers to Post Modernism What is architecture and what is its role in society? What does the future hold for architecture in Portland? Taught by John Doyle It is an under-appreciated fact that Portland is home to one of the finest, most diverse, and best preserved assortments of architectural specimens in the nation. In addition to the second largest concentrations of 19th century cast iron structures in America Portland is also home to two of the most important 20th century buildings in the world, Pietro Belluschi's Equitable Building and the much maligned Portland Building by Michael Graves, the father of Post-Modernism. What is architecture and what is its role in society? From whence do our notions about architecture originate? What makes an architectural style? What is philosophical difference in the nature of 19th vs. 20th century and contemporary architecture? What does the future hold for architecture? Week 1: A Whole New World. Where do theories of what architecture is and how it should look originate? How were these theories adapted and put into practice in a frontier environment like the Portland town site of the 19th century? What features help us distinguish one architectural style from another? Week 2: How Many Wonders Can One City Hold? This session will be a walking tour field trip in downtown Portland wherein course attendees will put the information gathered from the first class to use by examining and identifying various architectural styles still to be seen in downtown Portland. It will take place on a Saturday morning and students should plan on it lasting two hours. Week 3: Poor Unfortunate Souls. How did the charm, eclecticism, and decorative excess of 19th century historic revival styles give way to the sleek, functional minimalism of 20th century Modernism, often described as cold, impersonal, brutal, and rigidly dogmatic? Is Modernism these things? Week 4: To Infinity and Beyond! Where is architecture headed and how does Portland fare in assembling an array of structures which demonstrate the latest trends in cutting edge architecture? Student will also have an opportunity to share an example of their favorite architecture in town. John Doyle has an M.A. in Art History from Tufts University and is a former Education Department lecturer at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.
Tuesday
Jan
24
2017
Tuesday, January 24, 2017 from 7-8:30pm
7-8:30pm
From Pioneers to Post Modernism What is architecture and what is its role in society? What does the future hold for architecture in Portland? Taught by John Doyle It is an under-appreciated fact that Portland is home to one of the finest, most diverse, and best preserved assortments of architectural specimens in the nation. In addition to the second largest concentrations of 19th century cast iron structures in America Portland is also home to two of the most important 20th century buildings in the world, Pietro Belluschi's Equitable Building and the much maligned Portland Building by Michael Graves, the father of Post-Modernism. What is architecture and what is its role in society? From whence do our notions about architecture originate? What makes an architectural style? What is philosophical difference in the nature of 19th vs. 20th century and contemporary architecture? What does the future hold for architecture? Week 1: A Whole New World. Where do theories of what architecture is and how it should look originate? How were these theories adapted and put into practice in a frontier environment like the Portland town site of the 19th century? What features help us distinguish one architectural style from another? Week 2: How Many Wonders Can One City Hold? This session will be a walking tour field trip in downtown Portland wherein course attendees will put the information gathered from the first class to use by examining and identifying various architectural styles still to be seen in downtown Portland. It will take place on a Saturday morning and students should plan on it lasting two hours. Week 3: Poor Unfortunate Souls. How did the charm, eclecticism, and decorative excess of 19th century historic revival styles give way to the sleek, functional minimalism of 20th century Modernism, often described as cold, impersonal, brutal, and rigidly dogmatic? Is Modernism these things? Week 4: To Infinity and Beyond! Where is architecture headed and how does Portland fare in assembling an array of structures which demonstrate the latest trends in cutting edge architecture? Student will also have an opportunity to share an example of their favorite architecture in town. John Doyle has an M.A. in Art History from Tufts University and is a former Education Department lecturer at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.
Tuesday
Jan
17
2017
Tuesday, January 17, 2017 from 7-8:30pm
7-8:30pm
From Pioneers to Post Modernism What is architecture and what is its role in society? What does the future hold for architecture in Portland? Taught by John Doyle It is an under-appreciated fact that Portland is home to one of the finest, most diverse, and best preserved assortments of architectural specimens in the nation. In addition to the second largest concentrations of 19th century cast iron structures in America Portland is also home to two of the most important 20th century buildings in the world, Pietro Belluschi's Equitable Building and the much maligned Portland Building by Michael Graves, the father of Post-Modernism. What is architecture and what is its role in society? From whence do our notions about architecture originate? What makes an architectural style? What is philosophical difference in the nature of 19th vs. 20th century and contemporary architecture? What does the future hold for architecture? Week 1: A Whole New World. Where do theories of what architecture is and how it should look originate? How were these theories adapted and put into practice in a frontier environment like the Portland town site of the 19th century? What features help us distinguish one architectural style from another? Week 2: How Many Wonders Can One City Hold? This session will be a walking tour field trip in downtown Portland wherein course attendees will put the information gathered from the first class to use by examining and identifying various architectural styles still to be seen in downtown Portland. It will take place on a Saturday morning and students should plan on it lasting two hours. Week 3: Poor Unfortunate Souls. How did the charm, eclecticism, and decorative excess of 19th century historic revival styles give way to the sleek, functional minimalism of 20th century Modernism, often described as cold, impersonal, brutal, and rigidly dogmatic? Is Modernism these things? Week 4: To Infinity and Beyond! Where is architecture headed and how does Portland fare in assembling an array of structures which demonstrate the latest trends in cutting edge architecture? Student will also have an opportunity to share an example of their favorite architecture in town. John Doyle has an M.A. in Art History from Tufts University and is a former Education Department lecturer at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.
Tuesday
Jan
10
2017
Tuesday, January 10, 2017 from 7-8:30pm
7-8:30pm
From Pioneers to Post Modernism What is architecture and what is its role in society? What does the future hold for architecture in Portland? Taught by John Doyle It is an under-appreciated fact that Portland is home to one of the finest, most diverse, and best preserved assortments of architectural specimens in the nation. In addition to the second largest concentrations of 19th century cast iron structures in America Portland is also home to two of the most important 20th century buildings in the world, Pietro Belluschi's Equitable Building and the much maligned Portland Building by Michael Graves, the father of Post-Modernism. What is architecture and what is its role in society? From whence do our notions about architecture originate? What makes an architectural style? What is philosophical difference in the nature of 19th vs. 20th century and contemporary architecture? What does the future hold for architecture? Week 1: A Whole New World. Where do theories of what architecture is and how it should look originate? How were these theories adapted and put into practice in a frontier environment like the Portland town site of the 19th century? What features help us distinguish one architectural style from another? Week 2: How Many Wonders Can One City Hold? This session will be a walking tour field trip in downtown Portland wherein course attendees will put the information gathered from the first class to use by examining and identifying various architectural styles still to be seen in downtown Portland. It will take place on a Saturday morning and students should plan on it lasting two hours. Week 3: Poor Unfortunate Souls. How did the charm, eclecticism, and decorative excess of 19th century historic revival styles give way to the sleek, functional minimalism of 20th century Modernism, often described as cold, impersonal, brutal, and rigidly dogmatic? Is Modernism these things? Week 4: To Infinity and Beyond! Where is architecture headed and how does Portland fare in assembling an array of structures which demonstrate the latest trends in cutting edge architecture? Student will also have an opportunity to share an example of their favorite architecture in town. John Doyle has an M.A. in Art History from Tufts University and is a former Education Department lecturer at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.
Thursday
Sep
29
2016
Thursday, September 29, 2016 from 7-8:30pm
7-8:30pm
Direct Action Organizing Taught by Kent Smith Thursdays || September 8th - 29th || 7:00 - 8:30 pm Taborspace || 5441 SE Belmont St. Four weeks, $89 || Space is limited. 10 tuitions waivers are available to members of marginalized communities who would like to teach the course material to their community. Contact coordinatorpugspdx.com for info + instructions. Make a significant contribution to Social Justice by winning concrete change at both the local and systemic levels. Learn the principles of Direct-Action Organizing: how to mobilize the grassroots to carry out effective campaigns that win. Organizing is the act of mobilizing a community for action around its concerns, and for the long term. Direct Action is grounded in non-violent Civil Disobedience--in using the Power the people have to interrupt injustice--from boycotts and protest marches to building takeovers, sit-ins and the calculated breaking of unjust laws. Direct Action Organizing itself is the best way to show others how to Organize for Direct Action: teach through doing. Using a mix of readings, videos, discussion and experiential learning exercises, this course will cover the history of Organizing in America (and in Portland) while de-centering the Whiteness that has historically accompanied it. Participants will sketch and plan out their own idea for a Direct-Action Organizing campaign. You will finish this course with skills and strategies to plan, organize and implement effective protest campaigns, and to teach others to do the same. Week 1: Why We Fight What are our personal interests in Direct-Action Organizing? (If you're not sure about yours, this class is a safe place to figure it out.) We'll share our expectations, needs and goals for the course and discuss how our group will define “Organizing for Direct-Action”. We'll also take a brief trip through the history of Organizing. Week 2: Principles of Direct-Action Organizing What is the different between a Leader and an Organizer? Is it true that Organizing a community is the best way to teach its members how to Organize? We'll reflect of some of the giants of Organizing history and share ideas for de-centering Whiteness in Organizing. Week 3: Envisioning Protest Campaigns What are the typical elements of an Organizing Drive? Break-out groups will discuss the social justice concerns nearest and dearest to them and individuals begin to explore a critical approach to crafting a campaign around their social justice priorities. Week 4: What We Want to Do How might we go about Organizing a community for change? Look ahead while hearing about further resources and education for the aspiring Organizer. We'll reflect on the course and share some of the actions (if any) we are committed to taking, moving forward. Kent Smith is a former Organizer with ACORN and with the Oregon Student Association.
Thursday
Sep
22
2016
Thursday, September 22, 2016 from 7-8:30pm
7-8:30pm
Direct Action Organizing Taught by Kent Smith Thursdays || September 8th - 29th || 7:00 - 8:30 pm Taborspace || 5441 SE Belmont St. Four weeks, $89 || Space is limited. 10 tuitions waivers are available to members of marginalized communities who would like to teach the course material to their community. Contact coordinatorpugspdx.com for info + instructions. Make a significant contribution to Social Justice by winning concrete change at both the local and systemic levels. Learn the principles of Direct-Action Organizing: how to mobilize the grassroots to carry out effective campaigns that win. Organizing is the act of mobilizing a community for action around its concerns, and for the long term. Direct Action is grounded in non-violent Civil Disobedience--in using the Power the people have to interrupt injustice--from boycotts and protest marches to building takeovers, sit-ins and the calculated breaking of unjust laws. Direct Action Organizing itself is the best way to show others how to Organize for Direct Action: teach through doing. Using a mix of readings, videos, discussion and experiential learning exercises, this course will cover the history of Organizing in America (and in Portland) while de-centering the Whiteness that has historically accompanied it. Participants will sketch and plan out their own idea for a Direct-Action Organizing campaign. You will finish this course with skills and strategies to plan, organize and implement effective protest campaigns, and to teach others to do the same. Week 1: Why We Fight What are our personal interests in Direct-Action Organizing? (If you're not sure about yours, this class is a safe place to figure it out.) We'll share our expectations, needs and goals for the course and discuss how our group will define “Organizing for Direct-Action”. We'll also take a brief trip through the history of Organizing. Week 2: Principles of Direct-Action Organizing What is the different between a Leader and an Organizer? Is it true that Organizing a community is the best way to teach its members how to Organize? We'll reflect of some of the giants of Organizing history and share ideas for de-centering Whiteness in Organizing. Week 3: Envisioning Protest Campaigns What are the typical elements of an Organizing Drive? Break-out groups will discuss the social justice concerns nearest and dearest to them and individuals begin to explore a critical approach to crafting a campaign around their social justice priorities. Week 4: What We Want to Do How might we go about Organizing a community for change? Look ahead while hearing about further resources and education for the aspiring Organizer. We'll reflect on the course and share some of the actions (if any) we are committed to taking, moving forward. Kent Smith is a former Organizer with ACORN and with the Oregon Student Association.
Thursday
Sep
15
2016
Thursday, September 15, 2016 from 7-8:30pm
7-8:30pm
Direct Action Organizing Taught by Kent Smith Thursdays || September 8th - 29th || 7:00 - 8:30 pm Taborspace || 5441 SE Belmont St. Four weeks, $89 || Space is limited. 10 tuitions waivers are available to members of marginalized communities who would like to teach the course material to their community. Contact coordinatorpugspdx.com for info + instructions. Make a significant contribution to Social Justice by winning concrete change at both the local and systemic levels. Learn the principles of Direct-Action Organizing: how to mobilize the grassroots to carry out effective campaigns that win. Organizing is the act of mobilizing a community for action around its concerns, and for the long term. Direct Action is grounded in non-violent Civil Disobedience--in using the Power the people have to interrupt injustice--from boycotts and protest marches to building takeovers, sit-ins and the calculated breaking of unjust laws. Direct Action Organizing itself is the best way to show others how to Organize for Direct Action: teach through doing. Using a mix of readings, videos, discussion and experiential learning exercises, this course will cover the history of Organizing in America (and in Portland) while de-centering the Whiteness that has historically accompanied it. Participants will sketch and plan out their own idea for a Direct-Action Organizing campaign. You will finish this course with skills and strategies to plan, organize and implement effective protest campaigns, and to teach others to do the same. Week 1: Why We Fight What are our personal interests in Direct-Action Organizing? (If you're not sure about yours, this class is a safe place to figure it out.) We'll share our expectations, needs and goals for the course and discuss how our group will define “Organizing for Direct-Action”. We'll also take a brief trip through the history of Organizing. Week 2: Principles of Direct-Action Organizing What is the different between a Leader and an Organizer? Is it true that Organizing a community is the best way to teach its members how to Organize? We'll reflect of some of the giants of Organizing history and share ideas for de-centering Whiteness in Organizing. Week 3: Envisioning Protest Campaigns What are the typical elements of an Organizing Drive? Break-out groups will discuss the social justice concerns nearest and dearest to them and individuals begin to explore a critical approach to crafting a campaign around their social justice priorities. Week 4: What We Want to Do How might we go about Organizing a community for change? Look ahead while hearing about further resources and education for the aspiring Organizer. We'll reflect on the course and share some of the actions (if any) we are committed to taking, moving forward. Kent Smith is a former Organizer with ACORN and with the Oregon Student Association.
Thursday
Sep
8
2016
Thursday, September 8, 2016 from 7-8:30pm
7-8:30pm
Direct Action Organizing Taught by Kent Smith Thursdays || September 8th - 29th || 7:00 - 8:30 pm Taborspace || 5441 SE Belmont St. Four weeks, $89 || Space is limited. 10 tuitions waivers are available to members of marginalized communities who would like to teach the course material to their community. Contact coordinatorpugspdx.com for info + instructions. Make a significant contribution to Social Justice by winning concrete change at both the local and systemic levels. Learn the principles of Direct-Action Organizing: how to mobilize the grassroots to carry out effective campaigns that win. Organizing is the act of mobilizing a community for action around its concerns, and for the long term. Direct Action is grounded in non-violent Civil Disobedience--in using the Power the people have to interrupt injustice--from boycotts and protest marches to building takeovers, sit-ins and the calculated breaking of unjust laws. Direct Action Organizing itself is the best way to show others how to Organize for Direct Action: teach through doing. Using a mix of readings, videos, discussion and experiential learning exercises, this course will cover the history of Organizing in America (and in Portland) while de-centering the Whiteness that has historically accompanied it. Participants will sketch and plan out their own idea for a Direct-Action Organizing campaign. You will finish this course with skills and strategies to plan, organize and implement effective protest campaigns, and to teach others to do the same. Week 1: Why We Fight What are our personal interests in Direct-Action Organizing? (If you're not sure about yours, this class is a safe place to figure it out.) We'll share our expectations, needs and goals for the course and discuss how our group will define “Organizing for Direct-Action”. We'll also take a brief trip through the history of Organizing. Week 2: Principles of Direct-Action Organizing What is the different between a Leader and an Organizer? Is it true that Organizing a community is the best way to teach its members how to Organize? We'll reflect of some of the giants of Organizing history and share ideas for de-centering Whiteness in Organizing. Week 3: Envisioning Protest Campaigns What are the typical elements of an Organizing Drive? Break-out groups will discuss the social justice concerns nearest and dearest to them and individuals begin to explore a critical approach to crafting a campaign around their social justice priorities. Week 4: What We Want to Do How might we go about Organizing a community for change? Look ahead while hearing about further resources and education for the aspiring Organizer. We'll reflect on the course and share some of the actions (if any) we are committed to taking, moving forward. Kent Smith is a former Organizer with ACORN and with the Oregon Student Association.
Tuesday
Jun
28
2016
Tuesday, June 28, 2016 from 6:30-8:30pm
6:30-8:30pm
Staff will present an overview of the project and will welcome feedback on the draft proposals. (http://www.portlandoregon.gov/?c=26000&a=579726)