Your Community is Calling

Sun
Mon
Tue
Wed
Thu
Fri
Sat
Sunday
Aug
28
2016
with
Surfrider
Friday, August 26, 2016 at midnight through Monday, August 29, 2016 at midnight
midnight through Monday, August 29 at midnight
with
Surfrider
Friday, August 26, 2016 at midnight through Monday, August 29, 2016 at midnight
midnight through Monday, August 29 at midnight
Sunday, August 28, 2016 from 5-8pm
5-8pm
You're invited to join us at the The Hollywood Theatre, for a wonderful evening, honoring and celebrating the stories of amazing women and girls from our Portland community, with the girls of Produced by Her! This will be an evening focursed on the experiences that take place in Portland, specifically by women and girls. Paige Hendrix Buckner, founder of ClientJoy (http://www.clientjoy.com/paige/) will emcee our evening. Produced by Her is a 5-week media camp, that brings girls, aged 12-17, together, to learn about documentary filmmaking. In addition to filming their own documentaries, these girls created story maps in partnership with Metro. We will present this new map and the four new historical bike rides about the stories of the women who were included in the documentaries. Four short documentaries. Filmed by Portland's newest filmmakers. The documentaries that will be shared from them include: -The Commercial Sexual Exploitation of Children in Oregon -The Importance of Safe Space in the LGBTQ Community -Women & Street Art -The Experience of Black Girls in Portland In addition, Vox Siren, a creative change agency, that focuses on the stories of women and girls, will present a mini documentary about the experiences of the girls in Produced by Her. All Produced by Her Films are closed captioned. POWGirls, an organization that helps girls aged 15-19, explore their creativity, voices in media, and strength, will also be showing their original short films from this summer’s video workshops. Following the documentaries there will be an interactive panel that will include the filmmakers. *Additional Onsite Event and Amenities: -Live Mural Painting by the Talented folks at Viva La Free -Tabling from community organizations supporting women and girls We want to thank our partners in our program: Girls Inc. of the Pacific Northwest, NW Documentary and The Bicycle Transportation Alliance. Special Thanks to the Sponsors of this Event: Regional Arts & Culture Council, Metro, Travel Portland, Upswell, Cycle Oregon
Sunday, August 28, 2016 from 4:30-6:30pm
4:30-6:30pm
Portland Solidarity Network is an organization that is dedicated to fighting for our rights in the workplace and at home. This includes fighting sexism, racism, ableism, and other forms of discrimination in a way that empowers us and builds momentum to create a more equal world. Contact portlandsolidaritynetwork@gmail.com for more information.
Sunday, August 28, 2016 from 5-8pm
5-8pm
On August 28th, we will celebrate and uplift women & diversity in Portland with a screening of four documentaries filmed by young filmmakers, ages 12-17. This is a night to keep it local and learn about the experiences of women in Portland. We will watch four short documentaries by Portland’s powerhouse young filmmakers from Produced By Her by Vox Siren. Their shorts will explore The Commercial Sexual Exploitation of Children in Oregon, The Importance of Safe Space in the LGBTQ community, women and street art, and the experience of black girls in Portland. Vox Siren will also be presenting a short documentary about the girls experience becoming becoming filmmakers. This event is sponsored by Vox Siren, POWGirls, GirlsInc PNW, Metro, Travel Portland, RACC, Cycle Oregon
Sunday, August 28, 2016 from 11am-5pm
11am-5pm
The 8th competition of the Mad Bro Xtreme Amateur Games is a BMX Comp. Cash, and prizes awarded.It will be held at D-block Indoor Skate Park. In Portland OR. Winners are allowed to compete in following competition and the final. The Games consist of 10 competitions For BMX, Skate And scooter riders of all ages throughout this year . There are three levels for all ages , Beginner, Int. and advanced. Sign up online at madbroenterprises.com or at the Skate Park.
Monday
Aug
29
2016
Monday, August 29, 2016 at 7pm
7pm
Monday, August 29, 2016 at 8pm
8pm
Tuesday
Aug
30
2016
Tuesday, August 30, 2016 at 5pm through Monday, September 12, 2016 at 6pm
5pm through Monday, September 12 at 6pm
Schedule: People can arrive as early as 5pm on Tuesday, August 30th to set up camp. We will begin our work the following day. Each day will begin with a morning orientation for new participants to help prepare for the day ahead. A typical weekday may look something like this (weekends will be more centered around community-led workshops and fun time!): 8:00AM: Breakfast 9:00AM-10:00AM: Workshop/training. 10:30AM: On field days;Divide into teams, and get field routes prepared. Depart into the forest. 10:30-4:00PM: Most days, groups will be in the field participating in pertinent field work and groundtruthing. Other days this time may be dedicated to in-camp workshops or nearby day trips 4/5:00PM: Teams arrive back at camp no later than 5:00PM to debrief 6:00PM: Dinner, additional trainings or discussions. We will provide: A beautiful campsite (NW Forest Pass will not be necessary to park) Water Light breakfast (oatmeal or the like) Coffee and tea Dinner - Vegetarian/vegan (please come prepared for more specific dietary needs) Trainings and information! Supplies for groundtruthing and other group activities Please bring for yourself: Lunch, snacks and food to stay comfortable and happy! Please plan to pack lunch to keep you fed each day you are attending (Food to share is also appreciated!) A water bottle, mug, bowl, fork and spoon Tent, sleeping bag and sleeping pad A flashlight or headlamp Warm clothing & rain gear (just in case!) Boots and a change of shoes A vehicle (if you have one) Donations we're looking for: Cameras GPS devices Camp gear Coleman camp stove propane canisters FOOD DONATIONS -- Check back for specific food needs as the event approaches, and as needs arise SIGN UP AT bark-out.org/basecamp if you're interested in coming to the camop out or call (503) 331-0374 for more information. It is helpful to know you are coming so we can have enough food/space for all! If possible, please let us know approximately which days you are interested in attending. We will have a rideshare page (and driving directions) soon! Please use it to find a ride, and to offer rides to others. If you plan to drive please review Bark’s Expectations for all Drivers at, http://bark-out.org/content/expectations-all-bark-drivers. Driving Directions: Driving directions will be posted during the final weeks leading up to the event. https://www.facebook.com/events/1637167076606773/
Tuesday, August 30, 2016 from 5-7pm
5-7pm
Join us for a monthly happy hour meet up and get to know some other fun cycling gals. This month we're headed to Lucky Lab on SE 9th and Hawthorne where you can enjoy a brew, tasty treats and lounge their lovely shaded picnic tables on a sunny summer afternoon. We will meet at the Salmon Street fountain at 5pm and ride east at 5:20. Join us for the ride or meet us at Lucky Lab on Hawthorne. This event is open to all women, female-identifying, trans, and gender-nonconforming people who enjoy biking (or think that they might). Join our Facebook group to RSVP (Not required) www.facebook.com/groups/womenbikebta
Tuesday, August 30, 2016 at 7pm
7pm
Wednesday
Aug
31
2016
Wednesday, August 31, 2016 from 5-6pm
5-6pm
August 31, 5:00 p.m. Jackson County Library Medford Branch 205 S. Central Avenue, Medford The Oregon Legislature’s Joint Interim Committee on Transportation Preservation and Modernization is continuing a series of hearings throughout the state to hear from Oregonians. These hearings will inform what the Legislature will include in their transportation funding proposal. They need to hear from you! More info: https://btaoregon.org/2016/06/transportation-for-oregons-future-speak-out-for-safe-streets/
Wednesday, August 31, 2016 from 5-7pm
5-7pm
Event provides an opportunity for the public to find out about proposed code changes affecting mass shelters, short-term housing and affordable housing land use reviews (http://www.portlandoregon.gov/?c=26000&a=586632)
September
2016
Thursday
Sep
1
2016
with
Surfrider
Thursday, September 1, 2016 at midnight through Friday, September 2, 2016 at midnight
midnight through Friday, September 2 at midnight
Thursday, September 1, 2016 from 6:30-8:30pm
6:30-8:30pm
Magical Poetics: Inhabiting the Ritual Word Taught by Megan Freshley Thursdays || September 1st - 22nd || 6:30 - 8:30 pm Social Justice Action Center || 400 SE 12th Ave. Four weeks, $100 || Space is limited. What is magic exactly, and how does it relate to poetic craft? Poets often cite a connection with with the magical imagination as a source for their work. If we look at the word as a magical unit, we can inhabit the writing rituals of poets from various traditions and explore possibilities for making more room for magic within our own writing. In this course, we’ll unpack the relationship between magic and poetry through the lenses of rhetoric, Romance, literary theory, the creation of personal rituals, digital communication, and more. Beginners and experienced poets are welcome. “I am certain of nothing but the holiness of the heart’s affections and the truth of imagination.” — Keats Week 1: Romance + Rhetors What is performative utterance and how can it help us bring the "truth of imagination" into our daily lives? We'll explore the connective tissue between the mystical and the mundane via ancient thinkers, literary theorists and the Romantic poets. Week 2: Magic in 20th Century Poetics If language is a magical medium, then we can use it to experience and alter our environment. We’ll look at 20th century poets who used their craft for social activism as well as the nature poets who branched from the Romantic tradition. Week 3: Ritualizing the Creative Process How are some of the magically-inclined poets of our times operating, and how do their creative processes come into play? Why are witches having a cultural moment, and what are all those witches up to? We will brainstorm our own tailor-made poetic rituals. Week 4: Performative Utterances Share your own ritual-derived creative work generated during the course, or just observe your classmates' projects. Leave with a broadened framework for continuing your own poetic practice. Megan Freshley is a writer, editor, and witch living in Portland, OR. She taught writing at PSU and served as an editorial assistant for McSweeney’s Poetry Series. Megan’s work is published in Stay Wild, 1001, Poor Claudia: Phenome, and Witch Craft Magazine. She was a 2013 recipient of the Academy of American Poets Prize.
with
Surfrider
Thursday, September 1, 2016 from 6-7pm
6-7pm
Venue:
@
Sharkbites
Friday
Sep
2
2016
Friday, September 2, 2016 at 3pm through Sunday, September 4, 2016 at 9pm
3pm through Sunday, September 4 at 9pm
Venue:
@
Mt Hood
Did you know that the logging industry is one of the leading sources of greenhouse gases in Oregon? Come camping with 350PDX over Labor Day weekend as we partner with Bark, the volunteer-led, Watchdog organization working to defend and restore Mt. Hood National Forest. We are very excited about this unique opportunity for climate education in the forest! We'll be guided on hikes through the amazing carbon-sequestering trees of Mt. Hood (some of the best in the world!) and visiting sites where we can see evidence of how the forest deals with climate (both good and bad), and how climate activism appears on the landscape. Maybe we’ll even end up at a river to swim! Camp Orientation and Campfire Activities: Friday, Sept 2nd > Arrive 3-5 pm on Friday, Sept 2nd Camp Orientation 2 and Guided Forest Hike: Climate on the landscape: Saturday, Sept 3rd 11am-4pm > Arrive 9-11 am on Saturday, Sept 3rd Plant for the Planet Youth Climate Academy, Sunday Sept 4th 9a-4p > Arrive 5-7 pm on Saturday, Sept 3rd -OR- 8-9 am on Sunday, Sept 4th Before you come! Read about the camp, what to bring, and what to expect. Make sure to RSVP to Bark! So they bring enough food for all of us!: http://bark-out.org/event/summer-base-camp Bark staff and volunteers invite the public to camp with us along the Clackamas River, near Bagby Hot Springs. Our group campsite will be free of charge and family-friendly, and thanks to generous donations from our supporters and local businesses - breakfast and dinner will be provided! We will be holding a wide variety of free workshops and activities each evening at camp, from live improv theatre to climate action training! This camp out is our way of encouraging more people to get involved to advocate for the protection this amazing forest. The primary goal of this camp out is to bring people together to gather on-the-ground information about the area threatened by the Forest Service's Hunter Timber Sale project. https://www.facebook.com/events/596665737160975/
Friday, September 2, 2016 from 6:30-9pm
6:30-9pm
Ops Fest is proud to partner with the McMenamin's Mission Theatre for a 3rd performance, this time of Shakespeare's classic Romeo & Juliet. Half comedy, half tragedy, laugh along with the antics of Romeo and his gang until things turn dark.
Saturday
Sep
3
2016
with
SOLVE
Saturday, September 3, 2016 from 9-10am
9-10am
Join volunteers for this monthly First Saturday Cleanup in Slabtown. Pick up litter in the area. Coffee & tea provided by New Seasons Market. Volunteers should come prepared with completed waiver forms (if possible) and work gloves on cold days. Activities include: Litter Cleanup.
Sunday
Sep
4
2016
Friday, September 2, 2016 at 3pm through Sunday, September 4, 2016 at 9pm
3pm through Sunday, September 4 at 9pm
Venue:
@
Mt Hood
Did you know that the logging industry is one of the leading sources of greenhouse gases in Oregon? Come camping with 350PDX over Labor Day weekend as we partner with Bark, the volunteer-led, Watchdog organization working to defend and restore Mt. Hood National Forest. We are very excited about this unique opportunity for climate education in the forest! We'll be guided on hikes through the amazing carbon-sequestering trees of Mt. Hood (some of the best in the world!) and visiting sites where we can see evidence of how the forest deals with climate (both good and bad), and how climate activism appears on the landscape. Maybe we’ll even end up at a river to swim! Camp Orientation and Campfire Activities: Friday, Sept 2nd > Arrive 3-5 pm on Friday, Sept 2nd Camp Orientation 2 and Guided Forest Hike: Climate on the landscape: Saturday, Sept 3rd 11am-4pm > Arrive 9-11 am on Saturday, Sept 3rd Plant for the Planet Youth Climate Academy, Sunday Sept 4th 9a-4p > Arrive 5-7 pm on Saturday, Sept 3rd -OR- 8-9 am on Sunday, Sept 4th Before you come! Read about the camp, what to bring, and what to expect. Make sure to RSVP to Bark! So they bring enough food for all of us!: http://bark-out.org/event/summer-base-camp Bark staff and volunteers invite the public to camp with us along the Clackamas River, near Bagby Hot Springs. Our group campsite will be free of charge and family-friendly, and thanks to generous donations from our supporters and local businesses - breakfast and dinner will be provided! We will be holding a wide variety of free workshops and activities each evening at camp, from live improv theatre to climate action training! This camp out is our way of encouraging more people to get involved to advocate for the protection this amazing forest. The primary goal of this camp out is to bring people together to gather on-the-ground information about the area threatened by the Forest Service's Hunter Timber Sale project. https://www.facebook.com/events/596665737160975/
Sunday, September 4, 2016 from 4:30-6:30pm
4:30-6:30pm
Portland Solidarity Network is an organization that is dedicated to fighting for our rights in the workplace and at home. This includes fighting sexism, racism, ableism, and other forms of discrimination in a way that empowers us and builds momentum to create a more equal world. Contact portlandsolidaritynetwork@gmail.com for more information.
Monday
Sep
5
2016
Monday, September 5, 2016 at 8:30am
8:30am
Enjoy summer’s last holiday on Washington County’s Fanno Creek Trail. This is a 5K and 10K out and back course thru scenic natural areas and wetlands popular among runners, walkers, hawks and herons.
Tuesday
Sep
6
2016
Tuesday, September 6, 2016 at midnight through Wednesday, September 7, 2016 at midnight
midnight through Wednesday, September 7 at midnight
Protect the roads you train and ride on. To kick off the first race of the Portland Trophy Cup series, The Bicycle Transportation Alliance (BTA) will be on-hand to answer any questions you might have about the work they’re doing to make bicycling safe and accessible for all. For over 25 years, they have successfully advocated for bicyclists, helping make the Portland metro region one of the best areas in the country to ride a bicycle. As a result, our roads are safer for everyone, from people who walk to people who drive. They are committed to promoting bicycling in all its forms—commuting to work; running errands; family-friendly rides; and even bike racing. So how do I race for free? Sign up for a BTA membership (discounted to $35 for the night) and receive free race entry. A membership directly supports the work of the BTA and gets you discounts at more than 80 bike shops, restaurants and other bike-friendly businesses. Are you a lapsed member? Sign up for a sustaining (monthly) membership and receive free entry into the race plus access to member’s-only Chinook Book discounts. http://www.portlandtrophycup.com/
with
SOLVE
Tuesday, September 6, 2016 from 6:30-8:30pm
6:30-8:30pm
Join Portland’s Surfrider Foundation volunteers on the 1st Tuesday of the month for the Northside Green Streets off Alberta! Green Streets is a partnership between the City of Portland and the local Surfrider chapter that aims to keep our streets clean and our local bioswales healthy. Bioswales are those cool mini wetland garden thingies cut into the edge of many streets in town. Our Green Street Stewards, volunteer to clean up litter out of these swales and along the side of the road. This keeps litter out of our local watersheds, and since everything flows downstream, keeps litter out of our oceans. It’s a great way to act locally, and make impacts globally! The Surfrider Crew leader will make this volunteer event a fun night to remember, with some cool tunes and sweet treats. Come join us as we work together to keep our waterways clean.
Tuesday, September 6, 2016 from 6:30-8:30pm
6:30-8:30pm
The Problem with Privilege: Bias, Fragility + Taking Action to End Racism Taught by Christine Dupres Tuesdays, September 6-27 || 6:30-8:00 pm MarrowPDX || 7515 N Alma Ave. Four weeks, $150 || Space is limited || Scholarships available Acknowledging privilege proves to be a crucially important factor in understanding how structural racism and other "-isms" continue to exist. But understanding that you have privilege doesn't mean you understand what to do about it. Ignoring your privilege, however, allows racism and other -"isms" to thrive. This class is designed to help you be a better, more effective ally, especially if you're feeling stuck and ineffective. Fragility has uneven corollaries to non-white/non-male perspectives, but we will be addressing cultural privilege as a whole. This class will help you understand, identify, and interrupt implicit bias and white fragility, mechanisms that keep privilege in place. Note: This course is best suited to those who are familiar with and practiced in the basics of ally work. Week 1: Core Concepts for the Ally Racism and what it means to unpack privilege. Week 2: Defining Fragility Within the Rubric of Power and Privilege White fragility and how to recognize it. Where does white fragility show up in Portland? Week 3: Coalition of Communities of Color + Multnomah County Discussion of the Multnomah County Profile Reports from the Coalition of Communities of Color and more thoughts on white fragility in PDX. Week 4: Further Use of Concept and Tools Power protects itself. Other fragilities and ways we can interrupt them. Christine Dupres (Cowlitz/Cree), Ph.D., is a writer, teacher, and Native leader. She is the author of Being Cowlitz: How One Tribe Renewed and Sustained Its Identity (University of Washington Press). She has taught at the University of Pennsylvania and the University of Oregon.
Wednesday
Sep
7
2016
Wednesday, September 7, 2016 from 6-9pm
6-9pm
Wednesday, September 7, 2016 from 7-10pm
7-10pm
Wednesday, September 7, 2016 from 7-9pm
7-9pm
Create Your Own Quest: How To Imbue Your Time with More Meaning, More Joy + More Connection Taught by Melea Seward Wednesdays || September 7th - 28th || 7:00 - 9:00 pm SE Uplift || 3534 SE Main St. Space is limited to 25 participants. In Create Your Own Quest, we will discover ways to imbue your limited time on this planet with more joy, more meaning, and more connection. We will use TIME, ATTENTION, CONNECTION, and CURRENCY as constraints to help you create your own quest. In literature and films, quests often involve extensive travel and adventure, but your quest can also happen in your backyard, in your neighborhood, in your city, or on the web. Whether you want to visit every National Park in your lifetime, meet everyone who shares your first name in your zip code, or paint more, this course may be for you. Want to revive and pursue a dream that has faded? This is a great course to revisit and explore what is possible. Cost: It's $50 to enroll. At the end of the course, you will pay a second installment, the amount of which is completely up to you ($0 +), but reflects the value you received and the effort you created. Week 1: Thinking Bigger: Assessing What Is + Exploring the Possible As a culture, it seems we’re obsessed with life hacks, habits, and getting more done while spending less time on the doing. As adults, we tend to organize our lives around ATTENTION (what we pay attention to), CONNECTION (who we pay attention to), TIME (how we organize our days, weeks, month, years), and CURRENCY (how we pay for our lives, usually in some equation that factors in time and money). In this first class we will assess what is important to us and explore the possible. Week 2: Motion, Preparation + Divergence Luck favors the prepared. In the second week, we will look at famous and not-so-famous quests — we will break down how ordinary people have used constraints of time, space, place, money, and more to create more luck, or what I like to call, serendipity engines. It is difficult to stumble on an idea while seated, so we will look at ways to create more movement in your everyday life and prepare for the outcomes you’re interested in. Week 3: Commitment, Activation + Optimizing Connections How do you commit to an idea? How do you choose? In week three, through guided homework, readings, class discussion, and small group work, we will work on optimizing your connections with people and ideas. Week 4: Surprise + Delight Week four will be a co-facilitated class between the participants. You have to show up to see what happens. Melea Seward, Professional Generalist, is a communications and strategy consultant, speaker, improvisational storyteller and writer. She creates time-bound, rule-based projects and games that explore performance in everyday life. Most recently, she created Board of Us, a playful facilitation tool that she uses in her consulting work with clients ranging from soloprenuers and small business owners to established nonprofit organizations and multinational companies, including NBC, HBO, Shore Fire Media, Elixir Design and Girls for Gender Equity.
Wednesday, September 7, 2016 from 7:30-9am
7:30-9am
Join us for a morning cup-o-joe on your way to work Wednesday mornings from 7:30-9am. We will rotate locations each week so watch out for a Coffee Club along your commute route. This week Western Bikeworks is opening up special just for us, so pedal on by to NW Portland and get a little extra distance in plus a caffeine pick me up! Coffee Clubs are a place for women to come together, share biking experiences and get to know one another. All are welcome to stay for as long or little as you like on you way to the office. Non-commuters also welcome. This event is open to all women, female-identifying, trans, and gender-nonconforming people who enjoy biking (or think that they might). Join the Women Bike group and RSVP (not required) at www.facebook.com/groups/womenbikebta
Thursday
Sep
8
2016
Thursday, September 8, 2016 from 11am-2pm
11am-2pm
Connect with hundreds of local nonprofit organizations and learn about unique volunteer opportunities. (http://www.portlandoregon.gov/?c=26000&a=586443)
Thursday, September 8, 2016 from 4-6pm
4-6pm
Thursday, September 8, 2016 from 6-9pm
6-9pm
Thursday, September 8, 2016 from 6:30-9pm
6:30-9pm
$7-$10 Suggested donation, with no one turned away for lack of funds 21+ over BUY TICKETS: http://www.brownpapertickets.com/event/2592816 https://www.facebook.com/events/1416944064989130/ RAFFLE: Purchase some raffle tickets before the show at the theater, and win some cool prizes! (Must be present to purchase tix and win). COMEDY SHOWCASE: * Host: Tommy Moore (T.SIXX Production) Featuring Hilarious Comedians! * Betty Londgen * Bri Pruitt * Adam Pasi * Brandi Morgan * Belinda Giles * Nariko Ott * Debbie Wooten ** Help us raise funding for the voice of our community - KBOO Community Radio! KBOO is an independent, member-supported, non-commercial, volunteer-powered community radio station. KBOO embodies equitable social change, shares knowledge, and fosters creativity by delivering locally rooted and diverse music, culture, news, and opinions, with a commitment to the voices of oppressed and underserved communities. https://www.facebook.com/RIFFSLINGER https://www.facebook.com/Tsixx-production-LLC-416976781837039
Thursday, September 8, 2016 from 6:30-8:30pm
6:30-8:30pm
Magical Poetics: Inhabiting the Ritual Word Taught by Megan Freshley Thursdays || September 1st - 22nd || 6:30 - 8:30 pm Social Justice Action Center || 400 SE 12th Ave. Four weeks, $100 || Space is limited. What is magic exactly, and how does it relate to poetic craft? Poets often cite a connection with with the magical imagination as a source for their work. If we look at the word as a magical unit, we can inhabit the writing rituals of poets from various traditions and explore possibilities for making more room for magic within our own writing. In this course, we’ll unpack the relationship between magic and poetry through the lenses of rhetoric, Romance, literary theory, the creation of personal rituals, digital communication, and more. Beginners and experienced poets are welcome. “I am certain of nothing but the holiness of the heart’s affections and the truth of imagination.” — Keats Week 1: Romance + Rhetors What is performative utterance and how can it help us bring the "truth of imagination" into our daily lives? We'll explore the connective tissue between the mystical and the mundane via ancient thinkers, literary theorists and the Romantic poets. Week 2: Magic in 20th Century Poetics If language is a magical medium, then we can use it to experience and alter our environment. We’ll look at 20th century poets who used their craft for social activism as well as the nature poets who branched from the Romantic tradition. Week 3: Ritualizing the Creative Process How are some of the magically-inclined poets of our times operating, and how do their creative processes come into play? Why are witches having a cultural moment, and what are all those witches up to? We will brainstorm our own tailor-made poetic rituals. Week 4: Performative Utterances Share your own ritual-derived creative work generated during the course, or just observe your classmates' projects. Leave with a broadened framework for continuing your own poetic practice. Megan Freshley is a writer, editor, and witch living in Portland, OR. She taught writing at PSU and served as an editorial assistant for McSweeney’s Poetry Series. Megan’s work is published in Stay Wild, 1001, Poor Claudia: Phenome, and Witch Craft Magazine. She was a 2013 recipient of the Academy of American Poets Prize.
Thursday, September 8, 2016 from 6:30-8pm
6:30-8pm
Join Women Bike and Portland Bicycle Studio to learn more about cyclocross racing and riding skills. Clinic will meet by the tennis courts (near the entrance at 19th and Jarrett) The clinic will cover: -What is Cyclocross -Overview of cyclocross bikes -Skills clinic at park: dismounts, remounts, barriers, shouldering the bike, riding on different terrain It's ok if you don't have a cyclocross specific bike. Bring the bike you have, most road style bikes will do, and we will be riding on grass which is a more forgiving terrain. Portland Bicycle Studio will also provide some test bikes with them for you to try out. This event is open to all women, female-identifying, trans, and gender-nonconforming people who enjoy biking (or think that they might). Join the Women Bike group and RSVP (not required) at www.facebook.com/groups/womenbikebta
Thursday, September 8, 2016 from 7-8:30pm
7-8:30pm
Direct Action Organizing Taught by Kent Smith Thursdays || September 8th - 29th || 7:00 - 8:30 pm Taborspace || 5441 SE Belmont St. Four weeks, $89 || Space is limited. 10 tuitions waivers are available to members of marginalized communities who would like to teach the course material to their community. Contact coordinatorpugspdx.com for info + instructions. Make a significant contribution to Social Justice by winning concrete change at both the local and systemic levels. Learn the principles of Direct-Action Organizing: how to mobilize the grassroots to carry out effective campaigns that win. Organizing is the act of mobilizing a community for action around its concerns, and for the long term. Direct Action is grounded in non-violent Civil Disobedience--in using the Power the people have to interrupt injustice--from boycotts and protest marches to building takeovers, sit-ins and the calculated breaking of unjust laws. Direct Action Organizing itself is the best way to show others how to Organize for Direct Action: teach through doing. Using a mix of readings, videos, discussion and experiential learning exercises, this course will cover the history of Organizing in America (and in Portland) while de-centering the Whiteness that has historically accompanied it. Participants will sketch and plan out their own idea for a Direct-Action Organizing campaign. You will finish this course with skills and strategies to plan, organize and implement effective protest campaigns, and to teach others to do the same. Week 1: Why We Fight What are our personal interests in Direct-Action Organizing? (If you're not sure about yours, this class is a safe place to figure it out.) We'll share our expectations, needs and goals for the course and discuss how our group will define “Organizing for Direct-Action”. We'll also take a brief trip through the history of Organizing. Week 2: Principles of Direct-Action Organizing What is the different between a Leader and an Organizer? Is it true that Organizing a community is the best way to teach its members how to Organize? We'll reflect of some of the giants of Organizing history and share ideas for de-centering Whiteness in Organizing. Week 3: Envisioning Protest Campaigns What are the typical elements of an Organizing Drive? Break-out groups will discuss the social justice concerns nearest and dearest to them and individuals begin to explore a critical approach to crafting a campaign around their social justice priorities. Week 4: What We Want to Do How might we go about Organizing a community for change? Look ahead while hearing about further resources and education for the aspiring Organizer. We'll reflect on the course and share some of the actions (if any) we are committed to taking, moving forward. Kent Smith is a former Organizer with ACORN and with the Oregon Student Association.
Friday
Sep
9
2016
Friday, September 9, 2016 from 5-6pm
5-6pm
Friday, September 9, 2016, 5:00-6:00 PM "Casualties of Endless Wars" Lives, Compassion, The Economy, Privacy and the Environment Rally/March marking 15 Years since 9/11 Friday Rally and March w/Portland Peaceful Response Coalition Pioneer Courthouse Square, SW Yamhill and BroadwayFlyer
Friday, September 9, 2016 at 8pm through Saturday, September 10, 2016 at midnight
8pm through Saturday, September 10 at midnight
A celebration of 20 years of the Institute for Anarchist Studies (IAS), an organization that gives grants to radical writers, publishes its journal, Perspectives on Anarchist Theory, and co-publishes books with AK Press, while engaging in educational activities. This event will feature Portland DJs Katey Pants and Nathan Carson, and a performance by Mic Crenshaw. IAS literature will be available, as will beer. Come dance, talk, and have a great time! For more information, check out https://www.facebook.com/InstituteForAnarchistStudies/
Saturday
Sep
10
2016
Saturday, September 10, 2016 at midnight through Sunday, September 11, 2016 at midnight
midnight through Sunday, September 11 at midnight
yearly? 2nd saturday?
Saturday, September 10, 2016 from 6:30-9pm
6:30-9pm
An un-amplified, all acoustic showcase of early roots music in one of the oldest operating theatres on the West Coast. Hosted by Country Blues Yodeler Zach Bryson. Doors open at 6:30 show starts at 7. $10 in advanced at www.cstpdx.com $12 at the door. All Ages welcome! For more information, check out the website: http://www.cstpdx.com/content/clinton-street-stomp
Saturday, September 10, 2016 from 12:30-2pm
12:30-2pm
Feminist Meet Up, Brunch and Discussion Group is held on the second Saturday of every month from 12:30p-2:00p. Eat, drink, and bash patriarchy with fellow feminists! This discussion group is a friendly, open, exchange of ideas on a different topic each month. For the most up to date information, join us on www.facebook.com. Search for "Portland Feminist Meet-Up".
Saturday, September 10, 2016 from 9:30-11:30am
9:30-11:30am
Decoding Plants: Seeing Urban Flora with New Eyes Taught by Mulysa Melco Saturdays, September 10th - October 1st || 9:30-11:30 am Meets at Overlook Park Picnic Shelter || 1599 N Fremont St. Four weeks, $100 || Space is limited to 20 students. Have you ever walked around your neighborhood, or gone on a hike, and wished you knew the names of the plants you saw? Have you ever wondered how they fit into the ecosystem and what uses they have? Deepen your connection with the place we live by tuning in to the world of plants and learning how the flora of our bio-region is in flux. Understanding the species we share our home with positions us to be advocates for conservation and offers tools for reimagining our personal and collective relationships to nature. In this class, you’ll learn to recognize 12 common plant families and how to identify species using a plant key. By the end of the course, you’ll have created your own guide to the major plant families – and you will have fresh eyes for the plants that live right outside your door. Week 1: Plant Patterns Explore taxonomy (how plants are classified according to their relationships) and morphology (the form and parts of a plant), and meet our first three plant families. Week 2: Micro Explorations Practice using a key to identify plants in a diverse garden setting. Using drawing as a way to understand our subject, slow down to observe some of the intriguing details that differentiate species. Learn the key recognition characteristics of three more families that include many important food plants. Week 3: Macro Observations Walk to an oak/madrone woodland and discuss how local plant communities in Portland have changed over time, why some plants are considered weeds and what future plant communities in the bio-region could look like. Get the scoop on three plant families that are essential for wildlife habitat. Week 4: Plant Uses Learn three final families that include plants that are essential for humans as medicine. Discuss ethnobotany and examples of ways plants have co-evolved with animal species in the human-managed landscapes of the Willamette Valley. Where to Meet Us: Overlook Park picnic shelter. 1599 N Fremont St, Portland, OR 97227. 1 block West of Overlook Park MAX station. What to bring: Sketch book (6x6” or larger, unlined white paper) pencil (No.2), eraser, pencil sharpener optional: a plant guide arranged by family or a Pacific NW botany book. What to wear: Dress for the weather and bring sun/rain protection, drinking water and whatever you need to be comfortable walking outdoors. Mulysa Melco is an ecological landscape designer, horticulturist and artist with a lifelong passion for plants and exploring our connection with the land.
Sunday
Sep
11
2016
Sunday, September 11, 2016 at midnight through Friday, September 16, 2016 at midnight
midnight through Friday, September 16 at midnight
Venue:
@
Chapman School
Sunday, September 11, 2016 from 4:30-6:30pm
4:30-6:30pm
Portland Solidarity Network is an organization that is dedicated to fighting for our rights in the workplace and at home. This includes fighting sexism, racism, ableism, and other forms of discrimination in a way that empowers us and builds momentum to create a more equal world. Contact portlandsolidaritynetwork@gmail.com for more information.
Sunday, September 11, 2016 from 7-8:30pm
7-8:30pm
Monday
Sep
12
2016
Monday, September 12, 2016 from 6-7pm
6-7pm
Monday, September 12, 2016 from 1:30-3pm
1:30-3pm
Hearing on Proposed Draft of New Chinatown/Japantown Design Guidelines (http://www.portlandoregon.gov/?c=26000&a=573810)
Monday, September 12, 2016 from 7-9pm
7-9pm
Monday, September 12, 2016 from 7-8:30pm
7-8:30pm
Rewilding 101: Ancestral Ways of Living for a More Resilient Life Taught by Peter Michael Bauer Mondays, September 12 - October 3 || 7:00-8:30 pm Hatch Space || 2420 NE Sandy Blvd. Four weeks, $91 || Space is limited to 20 students Climate change, environmental destruction, patriarchy, privilege, consumerism, health issues, lack of community, the disconnect from nature, world hunger, population growth...all are rooted from the same problem: the domestication of humans and of the wild over the last several thousand years. How did we get into this mess? From conservation biology to the paleo diet, people are realizing that the neolithic period has led humanity astray. Rewilding offers us a way out. This class is an intense crash course on what rewilding is, how you can rewild, and why you must. You will be able to apply these principle directly to your life, here and now. Join us on a journey through the ecological, anthropological, and psychological principles behind rewilding. We'll discuss the myths we've constructed about prehistoric peoples, the problems that came with the innovation of agricultural civilization, and the benefits of indigenous horticulture. You will finish the course aware of the various ways that people are rewilding, as well as the barriers that stand in the way. You will see how rewilding is viewed by the mainstream, and how to integrate it into your life in a way to that is respectful to indigenous populations. Week 1: Exploring Prehistory When did we lose our connection to the natural world? What is "pre" history, and why should we care about it? What is our "common knowledge" of cavemen? Plus, we'll review a timeline of human evolution. Week 2: Defining Rewilding What is our concept of ideas like "wild" and "wilderness"? How are people using the term "rewilding"? How do hunter-gatherers change the landscape? We'll also start to look at things like community-building, land access, and how rewilding is both an environmental and social justice movement. Week 3: Hazards of Rewilding We'll address how fear, economic status, legalities, cultural appropriation, and privilege relate to rewilding and how to go about it in a safe, helpful, and respectful way. Week 4: Rewilding in Action What does rewilding look like? What are some barriers to rewilding? We'll look at examples of current rewilders and rewilding communities and examine the possibilities for rewilding in the future, and taking things to the next level. Peter Michael Bauer is an environmental educator, author of the book Rewild or Die and founder of Rewild Portland.
Monday, September 12, 2016 from 7-8:30pm
7-8:30pm
Monday, September 12, 2016 from 8-10pm
8-10pm
Tuesday
Sep
13
2016
Tuesday, September 13, 2016 from 12:30-3:30pm
12:30-3:30pm
The confirmed agenda for the PSC meeting will be posted approximately one week prior to the meeting. (http://www.portlandoregon.gov/?c=26000&a=545245)
Tuesday, September 13, 2016 from 6-7pm
6-7pm
Tuesday, September 13, 2016 from 6:30-8:30pm
6:30-8:30pm
The Problem with Privilege: Bias, Fragility + Taking Action to End Racism Taught by Christine Dupres Tuesdays, September 6-27 || 6:30-8:00 pm MarrowPDX || 7515 N Alma Ave. Four weeks, $150 || Space is limited || Scholarships available Acknowledging privilege proves to be a crucially important factor in understanding how structural racism and other "-isms" continue to exist. But understanding that you have privilege doesn't mean you understand what to do about it. Ignoring your privilege, however, allows racism and other -"isms" to thrive. This class is designed to help you be a better, more effective ally, especially if you're feeling stuck and ineffective. Fragility has uneven corollaries to non-white/non-male perspectives, but we will be addressing cultural privilege as a whole. This class will help you understand, identify, and interrupt implicit bias and white fragility, mechanisms that keep privilege in place. Note: This course is best suited to those who are familiar with and practiced in the basics of ally work. Week 1: Core Concepts for the Ally Racism and what it means to unpack privilege. Week 2: Defining Fragility Within the Rubric of Power and Privilege White fragility and how to recognize it. Where does white fragility show up in Portland? Week 3: Coalition of Communities of Color + Multnomah County Discussion of the Multnomah County Profile Reports from the Coalition of Communities of Color and more thoughts on white fragility in PDX. Week 4: Further Use of Concept and Tools Power protects itself. Other fragilities and ways we can interrupt them. Christine Dupres (Cowlitz/Cree), Ph.D., is a writer, teacher, and Native leader. She is the author of Being Cowlitz: How One Tribe Renewed and Sustained Its Identity (University of Washington Press). She has taught at the University of Pennsylvania and the University of Oregon.
Tuesday, September 13, 2016 from 6:30-7:30pm
6:30-7:30pm
Most people THINK they know all the rules that relate to bicycling in Oregon...until they attend our FREE legal clinic. Join us for an intensive clinic concerning Oregon bicycle and pedestrian laws, insurance information, and what to do if you’re in a crash. Ray Thomas literally wrote the book on Oregon's bike-related laws. It's called "Pedal Power" and all attendees of his 60-minute clinic receive a free copy. Legal Clinics are in conjunction with Swason, Thomas, Coon, and Newton. RSVP here- http://bta.nonprofitsoapbox.com/component/events/event/72 Facebook event here- https://www.facebook.com/events/463660470505910/ Questions? Contact Nicole Davenport at nicole@btaoregon.org
Tuesday, September 13, 2016 from 7-9pm
7-9pm
Tuesday, September 13, 2016 from 7-9pm
7-9pm
The public is invited to this monthly meeting of the Oregon Progressive Party. All are welcome, but only members get to vote on decisions.
Tuesday, September 13, 2016 at 8:30pm
8:30pm
Tuesday, September 13, 2016 at 7:30pm
7:30pm
Wednesday
Sep
14
2016
Wednesday, September 14, 2016 from 6-9pm
6-9pm
Women Bike is one year old! To celebrate the achievements of the last year we are holding an Anniversary celebration on September 14th from 6-9:00 p.m. at PCC Cascade campus. Join us for a free celebration of one year of getting more women on bikes plus a facilitated discussion about the state of women and biking in our region. Come lend your voice to supporting more women on bikes! Date & Time: Wednesday, September 14th from 6-9:00 p.m. Place: PCC Cascade Campus, Terrell Hall (Rm. 112) RSVP: Space is limited so please register and request any additional services here: https://www.tfaforms.com/436122 You can also join the Facebook event here: https://www.facebook.com/events/1368412733186176/ This event is open to all women, female-identifying, trans, and gender-nonconforming people who enjoy biking (or think that they might). Join the Women Bike Facebook group! www.facebook.com/groups/womenbikebta
Wednesday, September 14, 2016 from 6-8pm
6-8pm
PDXTech4Good Wednesday, September 14 at 6:00 PM Nonprofit projects come in all types and sizes, and managing them is rarely your sole job. Success is often found not in simply getting “the thing” do... http://www.meetup.com/pdxtech4good-nonprofit-activist-tech/events/233200807/
Wednesday, September 14, 2016 from 6-8pm
6-8pm
PDXTech4Good Wednesday, September 14 at 6:00 PM Nonprofit projects come in all types and sizes, and managing them is rarely your sole job. Success is often found not in simply getting “the thing” do... http://www.meetup.com/pdxtech4good-nonprofit-activist-tech/events/233200807/
Wednesday, September 14, 2016 from 7-9pm
7-9pm
Create Your Own Quest: How To Imbue Your Time with More Meaning, More Joy + More Connection Taught by Melea Seward Wednesdays || September 7th - 28th || 7:00 - 9:00 pm SE Uplift || 3534 SE Main St. Space is limited to 25 participants. In Create Your Own Quest, we will discover ways to imbue your limited time on this planet with more joy, more meaning, and more connection. We will use TIME, ATTENTION, CONNECTION, and CURRENCY as constraints to help you create your own quest. In literature and films, quests often involve extensive travel and adventure, but your quest can also happen in your backyard, in your neighborhood, in your city, or on the web. Whether you want to visit every National Park in your lifetime, meet everyone who shares your first name in your zip code, or paint more, this course may be for you. Want to revive and pursue a dream that has faded? This is a great course to revisit and explore what is possible. Cost: It's $50 to enroll. At the end of the course, you will pay a second installment, the amount of which is completely up to you ($0 +), but reflects the value you received and the effort you created. Week 1: Thinking Bigger: Assessing What Is + Exploring the Possible As a culture, it seems we’re obsessed with life hacks, habits, and getting more done while spending less time on the doing. As adults, we tend to organize our lives around ATTENTION (what we pay attention to), CONNECTION (who we pay attention to), TIME (how we organize our days, weeks, month, years), and CURRENCY (how we pay for our lives, usually in some equation that factors in time and money). In this first class we will assess what is important to us and explore the possible. Week 2: Motion, Preparation + Divergence Luck favors the prepared. In the second week, we will look at famous and not-so-famous quests — we will break down how ordinary people have used constraints of time, space, place, money, and more to create more luck, or what I like to call, serendipity engines. It is difficult to stumble on an idea while seated, so we will look at ways to create more movement in your everyday life and prepare for the outcomes you’re interested in. Week 3: Commitment, Activation + Optimizing Connections How do you commit to an idea? How do you choose? In week three, through guided homework, readings, class discussion, and small group work, we will work on optimizing your connections with people and ideas. Week 4: Surprise + Delight Week four will be a co-facilitated class between the participants. You have to show up to see what happens. Melea Seward, Professional Generalist, is a communications and strategy consultant, speaker, improvisational storyteller and writer. She creates time-bound, rule-based projects and games that explore performance in everyday life. Most recently, she created Board of Us, a playful facilitation tool that she uses in her consulting work with clients ranging from soloprenuers and small business owners to established nonprofit organizations and multinational companies, including NBC, HBO, Shore Fire Media, Elixir Design and Girls for Gender Equity.
Wednesday, September 14, 2016 from 7-9pm
7-9pm
Wednesday, September 14, 2016 at 7:30pm
7:30pm
Thursday
Sep
15
2016
Thursday, September 15, 2016 at 11am through Sunday, September 18, 2016 at 8pm
11am through Sunday, September 18 at 8pm
Portland’s largest Fall Recreational Vehicle Show, the Fall RV & Van Show, will return to the Portland Expo Center, September 15 through 18. This year’s event will feature Oregon’s top RV manufacturers and dealers, an exceptional variety of class A, B and C motorhomes, 5th wheels, campers, tent trailers, sport utility trailers, tow vehicles, accessories and so much more. Attendees of all ages will enjoy an abundance of travel resources, regionally manufactured RVs and pre-owned RV units. Fall is one of the best times of the year to make deals and negotiate pricing as 2017 models arrive, and the Fall RV & Van Show is the place to do it. In its 33rd consecutive year, the Fall RV & Van Show will feature the region’s best advice on service, national brands and accessories – making it the top fall RV consumer show in the Northwest. Discover the pleasure of owning an RV at the 2016 Fall RV & Van Show, the largest selection of RVs and manufacturer unveilings in the Northwest, featuring top national and local brands. Come shop, compare and buy all under one roof! Dates: Thursday-Saturday, September 15-17, 11am to 8pm Sunday, September 18, 11am to 6pm Admission: Adults $10 Children (12 and under) FREE Click here to download a 2-for-1 coupon and save $10! This coupon is valid every day of the show. Parking at Portland Expo Center is $8 per space. Carpools of three or more are $7 per space. No in and out privileges. For more information, please visit www.OTshows.com. See you at the show!
Thursday, September 15, 2016 from 6:30-9pm
6:30-9pm
This magical evening brings you live music and a great film. Melao De Cuba, a hot Latin Salsa ensemble will play before film from 6:45-7:15. The film starts right afterward. Sexy, sweet, “Chico & Rita” is an animated valentine to Cuba and its music. Shuttling between Havana and New York, the film brings alive an almost unimaginably rich and resonant moment in musical history. The fictional couple at its heart — star-crossed lovers and sometime artistic collaborators — encounter bad luck in various forms, but Chico and Rita also have the good fortune to mingle with real-life legends like Dizzy Gillespie, Thelonius Monk and the great Cuban conga player Chano Pozo, a crucial figure in the era’s mixing of styles and genres. Suggested $7-10, no one turned away for lack of funds! $8 advance tix can be purchased here: https://cstpdx-com.seatengine.com/shows/41793 https://www.facebook.com/events/1803706373195223/ Pozo died a violent death in Harlem in 1948, an event that injects a jolt of surreal gangster brutality into “Chico & Rita.” The movie was directed by Fernando Trueba, a filmmaker responsible for the crucial Cuban-jazz documentary “Calle 54”; Javier Mariscal, a Spanish artist and designer; and Tono Errando, Mr. Mariscal’s brother. It is a piquant collage of moods and colors, its buoyant fantasies shadowed by tragedy and loss. A whole palette of feeling — whimsy and pain, longing and laughter — can be experienced in the music, which combines a few vintage tunes with new compositions by Bebo Valdés, the great Cuban-born pianist and composer. Mr. Valdés, now 93, is also the physical and biographical inspiration for Chico (voiced by Emar Xor Oña), whom the film imagines in his vigorous prime and also in dignified old-age obscurity, shining shoes and sipping rum in a shabby Havana apartment. Havana itself appears in the same kind of double vision, its crumbling present-day streets giving way to the gaudy carnival of prerevolutionary decadence. Special admission: Suggested $7-10, with no one turned away for lack of funds.
with
Hatch
Thursday, September 15, 2016 from 2-3pm
2-3pm
TICKETS: http://www.eventbrite.com/e/workshop-legal-entity-choice-for-your-social-enterprise-tickets-20067582680 WORKSHOP - Legal Entity Choice for Your Social Enterprise  We will discuss types of legal entities available for social enterprise, from traditional corporations, B corporations, nonprofit corporations, and everything in between. At the end of this workshop, you will have more information about your options for choosing a legal structure for your social enterprise. Your Expert: Kate Kilberg Time of Day: 2:00 PM Room: Conference Room Duration: 60 minutes Topic Area: Legal
Thursday, September 15, 2016 from 5-6pm
5-6pm
September 15, 5:00 p.m. Ballroom Embarcadero Hotel 1000 SE Bay Blvd, Newport The Oregon Legislature’s Joint Interim Committee on Transportation Preservation and Modernization is continuing a series of hearings throughout the state to hear from Oregonians. These hearings will inform what the Legislature will include in their transportation funding proposal. They need to hear from you! More info: https://btaoregon.org/2016/06/transportation-for-oregons-future-speak-out-for-safe-streets/
with
Surfrider
Thursday, September 15, 2016 from noon-10pm
noon-10pm
Thursday, September 15, 2016 from 6:30-8:30pm
6:30-8:30pm
Magical Poetics: Inhabiting the Ritual Word Taught by Megan Freshley Thursdays || September 1st - 22nd || 6:30 - 8:30 pm Social Justice Action Center || 400 SE 12th Ave. Four weeks, $100 || Space is limited. What is magic exactly, and how does it relate to poetic craft? Poets often cite a connection with with the magical imagination as a source for their work. If we look at the word as a magical unit, we can inhabit the writing rituals of poets from various traditions and explore possibilities for making more room for magic within our own writing. In this course, we’ll unpack the relationship between magic and poetry through the lenses of rhetoric, Romance, literary theory, the creation of personal rituals, digital communication, and more. Beginners and experienced poets are welcome. “I am certain of nothing but the holiness of the heart’s affections and the truth of imagination.” — Keats Week 1: Romance + Rhetors What is performative utterance and how can it help us bring the "truth of imagination" into our daily lives? We'll explore the connective tissue between the mystical and the mundane via ancient thinkers, literary theorists and the Romantic poets. Week 2: Magic in 20th Century Poetics If language is a magical medium, then we can use it to experience and alter our environment. We’ll look at 20th century poets who used their craft for social activism as well as the nature poets who branched from the Romantic tradition. Week 3: Ritualizing the Creative Process How are some of the magically-inclined poets of our times operating, and how do their creative processes come into play? Why are witches having a cultural moment, and what are all those witches up to? We will brainstorm our own tailor-made poetic rituals. Week 4: Performative Utterances Share your own ritual-derived creative work generated during the course, or just observe your classmates' projects. Leave with a broadened framework for continuing your own poetic practice. Megan Freshley is a writer, editor, and witch living in Portland, OR. She taught writing at PSU and served as an editorial assistant for McSweeney’s Poetry Series. Megan’s work is published in Stay Wild, 1001, Poor Claudia: Phenome, and Witch Craft Magazine. She was a 2013 recipient of the Academy of American Poets Prize.
Thursday, September 15, 2016 from 7-9pm
7-9pm
Thursday, September 15, 2016 from 7-8:30pm
7-8:30pm
Direct Action Organizing Taught by Kent Smith Thursdays || September 8th - 29th || 7:00 - 8:30 pm Taborspace || 5441 SE Belmont St. Four weeks, $89 || Space is limited. 10 tuitions waivers are available to members of marginalized communities who would like to teach the course material to their community. Contact coordinatorpugspdx.com for info + instructions. Make a significant contribution to Social Justice by winning concrete change at both the local and systemic levels. Learn the principles of Direct-Action Organizing: how to mobilize the grassroots to carry out effective campaigns that win. Organizing is the act of mobilizing a community for action around its concerns, and for the long term. Direct Action is grounded in non-violent Civil Disobedience--in using the Power the people have to interrupt injustice--from boycotts and protest marches to building takeovers, sit-ins and the calculated breaking of unjust laws. Direct Action Organizing itself is the best way to show others how to Organize for Direct Action: teach through doing. Using a mix of readings, videos, discussion and experiential learning exercises, this course will cover the history of Organizing in America (and in Portland) while de-centering the Whiteness that has historically accompanied it. Participants will sketch and plan out their own idea for a Direct-Action Organizing campaign. You will finish this course with skills and strategies to plan, organize and implement effective protest campaigns, and to teach others to do the same. Week 1: Why We Fight What are our personal interests in Direct-Action Organizing? (If you're not sure about yours, this class is a safe place to figure it out.) We'll share our expectations, needs and goals for the course and discuss how our group will define “Organizing for Direct-Action”. We'll also take a brief trip through the history of Organizing. Week 2: Principles of Direct-Action Organizing What is the different between a Leader and an Organizer? Is it true that Organizing a community is the best way to teach its members how to Organize? We'll reflect of some of the giants of Organizing history and share ideas for de-centering Whiteness in Organizing. Week 3: Envisioning Protest Campaigns What are the typical elements of an Organizing Drive? Break-out groups will discuss the social justice concerns nearest and dearest to them and individuals begin to explore a critical approach to crafting a campaign around their social justice priorities. Week 4: What We Want to Do How might we go about Organizing a community for change? Look ahead while hearing about further resources and education for the aspiring Organizer. We'll reflect on the course and share some of the actions (if any) we are committed to taking, moving forward. Kent Smith is a former Organizer with ACORN and with the Oregon Student Association.
Friday
Sep
16
2016
Friday, September 16, 2016 from noon-7pm
noon-7pm
Dress for Success Oregon’s Acey’s Closet Fall Clothing Sale September 16, 17 & 18! Who: Dress for Success Oregon will open their doors to the Portland and SW Washington community. What: Amazing Deals, Incredible Cause! Come shop til' you drop at Dress for Success Oregon’s Summer Acey's Closet Clothing Sale and score amazing deals on new and gently used women's designer clothing, shoes and accessories (starting at $5!), featuring designers like Banana Republic, Ann Taylor, and more! Sale proceeds benefit important career programs for Dress for Success Oregon clients. Who said shopping can't be philanthropic? This time around we will have a vintage rack and designer rack with hidden treasures throughout for everyone! Don’t forget about our accessory grab bags and raffle tickets available for purchase! When: Friday, September 16: 12pm-7pm, Saturday, September 17: 10am-4pm & Sunday, September 18: 11am-1:30pm. $3 BLOW OUT sale Sunday 2-4pm.* Admission for $3 blowout sale by purchasing a minimum of $30 worth of merchandise Friday, Saturday or Sunday (11-1:30). Cash and credit card only (no checks please) ALL SALES FINAL. Where: Dress for Success Oregon, 1532 NE 37th Ave, Suite B, Portland, OR 97232. Parking on street or in Banfield Motel parking lot. Why: Dress for Success Oregon sells their excess clothing inventory 2-3 times per year at their Acey’s Closet Clothing Sales to raise funding for their career development programs that help women get jobs, keep jobs and thrive in work and in life! Contact Jenny Jameson Development & Communications Manager Dress for Success Oregon jennyj@dressforsuccessoregon.org 503.249.7300 To learn more about how Dress for Success Oregon helps local women, visit: https://oregon.dressforsuccess.org
Saturday
Sep
17
2016
with
Surfrider
Saturday, September 17, 2016 at midnight through Sunday, September 18, 2016 at midnight
midnight through Sunday, September 18 at midnight
Saturday, September 17, 2016 from 2-5pm
2-5pm
Join Women Bike and BIKETOWN for an ice cream social on bike share. RSVP here to get your free day pass for the ride: www.btaoregon.org/biketownsocial Pick up a bike near you or take transit to Holladay park and pick up a bike there. Meet at Holladay Park with BIKETOWN bikes at 2pm, we will have a short presentation and Q&A period with BIKETOWN starting at 2:00. By 2:20 we will start the ride to Fifty Licks on Clinton St for ice cream. BIKETOWN can answer additional questions during the social. Then you can leave the bikes on Clinton St or ride back to your neighborhood or transit stop. Remember RSVP REQUIRED to get a free day pass. Participants will also be required to create a free BIKETOWN account to utilize the day pass. RSVP at www.btaoregon.org/biketownsocial We will ride at a social pace along neighborhood streets and roads with bike lanes. This event is open to all women, female-identifying, trans, and gender-nonconforming people who enjoy biking (or think that they might).
Saturday, September 17, 2016 from 9-10am
9-10am
with
SOLVE
Saturday, September 17, 2016 at 9am
9am
We are beautifying Vancouver's waterfront! This project will primarily involve picking up litter along the Columbia River east of the I-5 within the property of Fort Vancouver National Historic Site. Gloves, trash bags, and trash picker-uppers will be provided. Lunch break planned around noon-ish. There is no minimum time requirement, you can can for 50 minutes or the full 3 hours! We appreciate all the help that we can get!
Saturday, September 17, 2016 from 9:30-11:30am
9:30-11:30am
Decoding Plants: Seeing Urban Flora with New Eyes Taught by Mulysa Melco Saturdays, September 10th - October 1st || 9:30-11:30 am Meets at Overlook Park Picnic Shelter || 1599 N Fremont St. Four weeks, $100 || Space is limited to 20 students. Have you ever walked around your neighborhood, or gone on a hike, and wished you knew the names of the plants you saw? Have you ever wondered how they fit into the ecosystem and what uses they have? Deepen your connection with the place we live by tuning in to the world of plants and learning how the flora of our bio-region is in flux. Understanding the species we share our home with positions us to be advocates for conservation and offers tools for reimagining our personal and collective relationships to nature. In this class, you’ll learn to recognize 12 common plant families and how to identify species using a plant key. By the end of the course, you’ll have created your own guide to the major plant families – and you will have fresh eyes for the plants that live right outside your door. Week 1: Plant Patterns Explore taxonomy (how plants are classified according to their relationships) and morphology (the form and parts of a plant), and meet our first three plant families. Week 2: Micro Explorations Practice using a key to identify plants in a diverse garden setting. Using drawing as a way to understand our subject, slow down to observe some of the intriguing details that differentiate species. Learn the key recognition characteristics of three more families that include many important food plants. Week 3: Macro Observations Walk to an oak/madrone woodland and discuss how local plant communities in Portland have changed over time, why some plants are considered weeds and what future plant communities in the bio-region could look like. Get the scoop on three plant families that are essential for wildlife habitat. Week 4: Plant Uses Learn three final families that include plants that are essential for humans as medicine. Discuss ethnobotany and examples of ways plants have co-evolved with animal species in the human-managed landscapes of the Willamette Valley. Where to Meet Us: Overlook Park picnic shelter. 1599 N Fremont St, Portland, OR 97227. 1 block West of Overlook Park MAX station. What to bring: Sketch book (6x6” or larger, unlined white paper) pencil (No.2), eraser, pencil sharpener optional: a plant guide arranged by family or a Pacific NW botany book. What to wear: Dress for the weather and bring sun/rain protection, drinking water and whatever you need to be comfortable walking outdoors. Mulysa Melco is an ecological landscape designer, horticulturist and artist with a lifelong passion for plants and exploring our connection with the land.
Saturday, September 17, 2016 from 10am-4pm
10am-4pm
Cascade Radio Network Summit will be a one-day event in Tacoma, WA. The summit will bring media producers together to exchange ideas, network, and support community radio and podcasting endeavors that are established or starting up in the Pacific Northwest. The Cascade Radio Network (CRN) is a community partnership between NAAME, Radio Tacoma, KBOO Community Radio, and individual participants. The CRN will bring underrepresented voices from our region to the media and focus on issues of social justice, community building, and the environment. Our flagship show will be available to stations weekly and will feature content from producers throughout Cascadia. We will seek underwriting for the show and develop asks from major donors. We aim to create and distribute content with depth and sincerity that will continually build in popularity. The success of the network depends on developing partnerships and collaborations. www.cascaderadio.org
Saturday, September 17, 2016 from noon-2pm
noon-2pm
PFLAG Portland Black Chapter (PBC) hosts monthly meetings and socials to provide a safe space for LGBT African Americans, their friends and family, to engage in dialogue, self-reflection, connect with community members, socialize and network, and access support and resources.
with
SOLVE
Saturday, September 17, 2016 from 9am-noon
9am-noon
Venue:
@
Timberline Lodge
Help us clean up this recreational hotspot and top of the Sandy Watershed! As the upper portion of our Timberline to Troutdale Cleanup, the Salmon Headwaters Cleanup is focused on reducing trash with a watershed-wide impact. Coordinated by the Sandy River Basin Watershed Council and Snowrider Project, in partnership with the Mt. Hood National Forest Zigzag District, Timberline Lodge, and others. Volunteers of all skill levels are welcome, just bring sturdy footwear, water, and appropriate clothing for mountain weather. Information about an after-party will be available soon. Contact Sara Ennis with any questions!
Sunday
Sep
18
2016
Sunday, September 18, 2016 from noon-2pm
noon-2pm
IOW holds its monthly Board meeting on the 3rd Sunday of each month. Meetings are held at In Other Words and are open to the entire community. Please join us to hear about our work, what's going on with the organization, and how you can plugin. Board minutes are available upon request. Email board@inotherwords.org for more info, or if you would like to request an agenda item.
Thursday, September 15, 2016 at 11am through Sunday, September 18, 2016 at 8pm
11am through Sunday, September 18 at 8pm
Portland’s largest Fall Recreational Vehicle Show, the Fall RV & Van Show, will return to the Portland Expo Center, September 15 through 18. This year’s event will feature Oregon’s top RV manufacturers and dealers, an exceptional variety of class A, B and C motorhomes, 5th wheels, campers, tent trailers, sport utility trailers, tow vehicles, accessories and so much more. Attendees of all ages will enjoy an abundance of travel resources, regionally manufactured RVs and pre-owned RV units. Fall is one of the best times of the year to make deals and negotiate pricing as 2017 models arrive, and the Fall RV & Van Show is the place to do it. In its 33rd consecutive year, the Fall RV & Van Show will feature the region’s best advice on service, national brands and accessories – making it the top fall RV consumer show in the Northwest. Discover the pleasure of owning an RV at the 2016 Fall RV & Van Show, the largest selection of RVs and manufacturer unveilings in the Northwest, featuring top national and local brands. Come shop, compare and buy all under one roof! Dates: Thursday-Saturday, September 15-17, 11am to 8pm Sunday, September 18, 11am to 6pm Admission: Adults $10 Children (12 and under) FREE Click here to download a 2-for-1 coupon and save $10! This coupon is valid every day of the show. Parking at Portland Expo Center is $8 per space. Carpools of three or more are $7 per space. No in and out privileges. For more information, please visit www.OTshows.com. See you at the show!
Sunday, September 18, 2016 from 1-4pm
1-4pm
Sunday, September 18, 2016 from 4:30-6:30pm
4:30-6:30pm
Portland Solidarity Network is an organization that is dedicated to fighting for our rights in the workplace and at home. This includes fighting sexism, racism, ableism, and other forms of discrimination in a way that empowers us and builds momentum to create a more equal world. Contact portlandsolidaritynetwork@gmail.com for more information.
Monday
Sep
19
2016
Monday, September 19, 2016 from 3-5pm
3-5pm
Drop in to chat with planning staff about proposed Comprehensive Plan changes in your neighborhood. (http://www.portlandoregon.gov/?c=26000&a=586671)
Monday, September 19, 2016 from 5-6pm
5-6pm
September 19, 5:00 p.m. Shirley Huffman Auditorium Hillsboro Civic Center 150 E. Main Street, Hillsboro The Oregon Legislature’s Joint Interim Committee on Transportation Preservation and Modernization is continuing a series of hearings throughout the state to hear from Oregonians. These hearings will inform what the Legislature will include in their transportation funding proposal. They need to hear from you! More info: https://btaoregon.org/2016/06/transportation-for-oregons-future-speak-out-for-safe-streets/
Monday, September 19, 2016 from 5:30-7:30pm
5:30-7:30pm
Drop in to chat with planning staff about proposed Comprehensive Plan changes in your neighborhood. (http://www.portlandoregon.gov/?c=26000&a=586672)
Monday, September 19, 2016 from 7-8:30pm
7-8:30pm
Rewilding 101: Ancestral Ways of Living for a More Resilient Life Taught by Peter Michael Bauer Mondays, September 12 - October 3 || 7:00-8:30 pm Hatch Space || 2420 NE Sandy Blvd. Four weeks, $91 || Space is limited to 20 students Climate change, environmental destruction, patriarchy, privilege, consumerism, health issues, lack of community, the disconnect from nature, world hunger, population growth...all are rooted from the same problem: the domestication of humans and of the wild over the last several thousand years. How did we get into this mess? From conservation biology to the paleo diet, people are realizing that the neolithic period has led humanity astray. Rewilding offers us a way out. This class is an intense crash course on what rewilding is, how you can rewild, and why you must. You will be able to apply these principle directly to your life, here and now. Join us on a journey through the ecological, anthropological, and psychological principles behind rewilding. We'll discuss the myths we've constructed about prehistoric peoples, the problems that came with the innovation of agricultural civilization, and the benefits of indigenous horticulture. You will finish the course aware of the various ways that people are rewilding, as well as the barriers that stand in the way. You will see how rewilding is viewed by the mainstream, and how to integrate it into your life in a way to that is respectful to indigenous populations. Week 1: Exploring Prehistory When did we lose our connection to the natural world? What is "pre" history, and why should we care about it? What is our "common knowledge" of cavemen? Plus, we'll review a timeline of human evolution. Week 2: Defining Rewilding What is our concept of ideas like "wild" and "wilderness"? How are people using the term "rewilding"? How do hunter-gatherers change the landscape? We'll also start to look at things like community-building, land access, and how rewilding is both an environmental and social justice movement. Week 3: Hazards of Rewilding We'll address how fear, economic status, legalities, cultural appropriation, and privilege relate to rewilding and how to go about it in a safe, helpful, and respectful way. Week 4: Rewilding in Action What does rewilding look like? What are some barriers to rewilding? We'll look at examples of current rewilders and rewilding communities and examine the possibilities for rewilding in the future, and taking things to the next level. Peter Michael Bauer is an environmental educator, author of the book Rewild or Die and founder of Rewild Portland.
Monday, September 19, 2016 from 7-8:30pm
7-8:30pm
The Jacobin reading group meets monthly to discuss socialist perspectives on politics, economics, and culture. Jacobin is a leading voice of the American left. The print magazine is released quarterly and reaches over 15,000 subscribers and a web audience of 700,000. Meets every 3rd Monday of the month from 7 - 8:30 PM at the Social Justice Action Center Address: 400 SE 12th Ave, Portland, OR 97214 Next meet up: Sep 19th For more info visit: https://www.facebook.com/groups/431482227017289/ Or e-mail: Outreach@JacobinMag.com
Tuesday
Sep
20
2016
Tuesday, September 20, 2016 from 4:30-6:30pm
4:30-6:30pm
Drop in to chat with planning staff about proposed Comprehensive Plan changes in your neighborhood. (http://www.portlandoregon.gov/?c=26000&a=586673)
Tuesday, September 20, 2016 from 6-9pm
6-9pm
Join us for a celebration of people and place (http://www.portlandoregon.gov/?c=26000&a=585619)
Tuesday, September 20, 2016 from 6:30-8:30pm
6:30-8:30pm
The Problem with Privilege: Bias, Fragility + Taking Action to End Racism Taught by Christine Dupres Tuesdays, September 6-27 || 6:30-8:00 pm MarrowPDX || 7515 N Alma Ave. Four weeks, $150 || Space is limited || Scholarships available Acknowledging privilege proves to be a crucially important factor in understanding how structural racism and other "-isms" continue to exist. But understanding that you have privilege doesn't mean you understand what to do about it. Ignoring your privilege, however, allows racism and other -"isms" to thrive. This class is designed to help you be a better, more effective ally, especially if you're feeling stuck and ineffective. Fragility has uneven corollaries to non-white/non-male perspectives, but we will be addressing cultural privilege as a whole. This class will help you understand, identify, and interrupt implicit bias and white fragility, mechanisms that keep privilege in place. Note: This course is best suited to those who are familiar with and practiced in the basics of ally work. Week 1: Core Concepts for the Ally Racism and what it means to unpack privilege. Week 2: Defining Fragility Within the Rubric of Power and Privilege White fragility and how to recognize it. Where does white fragility show up in Portland? Week 3: Coalition of Communities of Color + Multnomah County Discussion of the Multnomah County Profile Reports from the Coalition of Communities of Color and more thoughts on white fragility in PDX. Week 4: Further Use of Concept and Tools Power protects itself. Other fragilities and ways we can interrupt them. Christine Dupres (Cowlitz/Cree), Ph.D., is a writer, teacher, and Native leader. She is the author of Being Cowlitz: How One Tribe Renewed and Sustained Its Identity (University of Washington Press). She has taught at the University of Pennsylvania and the University of Oregon.
with
Surfrider
Tuesday, September 20, 2016 from 6:30-7:30pm
6:30-7:30pm
Laura's House, Newport OR (call (541) 815-3398 for directions)
Tuesday, September 20, 2016 from 7-8:30pm
7-8:30pm
The Portland Audubon Society welcomes author and Portland hiking expert Laura O. Foster for a free presentation of her new book, Columbia Gorge Getaways.Contact the Nature Store at (503)292-9453 for more information. Laura is the author of seven popular books on hiking and travel in the Portland region, including the recent Walking with Ramona: Exploring Beverly Cleary’s Portland. She regularly appears at Audubon’s Wild Arts Festival Book Fair. A book-signing will follow her presentation.
Tuesday, September 20, 2016 from 6-9pm
6-9pm
This September, Ecotrust is putting down new roots at the Redd and celebrating 25 years of good work we’ve done together to make our region thrive. A birthday bash to remember, we’ll share a hearty taste of home with delicious regional cuisine, groove to the locally grown acoustics of Horse Feathers, and take time to toast some of our heroes — people working every day to make this place better for future generations. A unique backdrop that tells the story of Portland’s industrial roots, the Redd is the perfect venue for a late summer evening. The campus will be transformed into two blocks of live music, delicious regional food, art, and interactive exhibits to get to know the people and partners behind the Redd project and our work in the region. Join us to celebrate this major milestone!
Wednesday
Sep
21
2016
Wednesday, September 21, 2016 from 7:30-9am
7:30-9am
Join us for a morning cup-o-joe on your way to work Wednesday mornings from 7:30-9am. We will rotate locations each week so watch out for a Coffee Club along your commute route. We will meet for coffee beginning at 7:30. Around 8:30 we will pack up and then ride a common commute route to downtown to provide some help to new commuters on how to get to work. Coffee Clubs are a place for women to come together, share biking experiences and get to know one another. All are welcome to stay for as long or little as you like on you way to the office. Non-commuters also welcome. This event is open to all women, female-identifying, trans, and gender-nonconforming people who enjoy biking (or think that they might). Join the Women Bike group and RSVP (not required) at www.facebook.com/groups/womenbikebta
with
Surfrider
Wednesday, September 21, 2016 from 6:30-7:30pm
6:30-7:30pm
Venue:
@
TBA
Wednesday, September 21, 2016 at 7pm
7pm
Wednesday, September 21, 2016 from 7-9pm
7-9pm
Create Your Own Quest: How To Imbue Your Time with More Meaning, More Joy + More Connection Taught by Melea Seward Wednesdays || September 7th - 28th || 7:00 - 9:00 pm SE Uplift || 3534 SE Main St. Space is limited to 25 participants. In Create Your Own Quest, we will discover ways to imbue your limited time on this planet with more joy, more meaning, and more connection. We will use TIME, ATTENTION, CONNECTION, and CURRENCY as constraints to help you create your own quest. In literature and films, quests often involve extensive travel and adventure, but your quest can also happen in your backyard, in your neighborhood, in your city, or on the web. Whether you want to visit every National Park in your lifetime, meet everyone who shares your first name in your zip code, or paint more, this course may be for you. Want to revive and pursue a dream that has faded? This is a great course to revisit and explore what is possible. Cost: It's $50 to enroll. At the end of the course, you will pay a second installment, the amount of which is completely up to you ($0 +), but reflects the value you received and the effort you created. Week 1: Thinking Bigger: Assessing What Is + Exploring the Possible As a culture, it seems we’re obsessed with life hacks, habits, and getting more done while spending less time on the doing. As adults, we tend to organize our lives around ATTENTION (what we pay attention to), CONNECTION (who we pay attention to), TIME (how we organize our days, weeks, month, years), and CURRENCY (how we pay for our lives, usually in some equation that factors in time and money). In this first class we will assess what is important to us and explore the possible. Week 2: Motion, Preparation + Divergence Luck favors the prepared. In the second week, we will look at famous and not-so-famous quests — we will break down how ordinary people have used constraints of time, space, place, money, and more to create more luck, or what I like to call, serendipity engines. It is difficult to stumble on an idea while seated, so we will look at ways to create more movement in your everyday life and prepare for the outcomes you’re interested in. Week 3: Commitment, Activation + Optimizing Connections How do you commit to an idea? How do you choose? In week three, through guided homework, readings, class discussion, and small group work, we will work on optimizing your connections with people and ideas. Week 4: Surprise + Delight Week four will be a co-facilitated class between the participants. You have to show up to see what happens. Melea Seward, Professional Generalist, is a communications and strategy consultant, speaker, improvisational storyteller and writer. She creates time-bound, rule-based projects and games that explore performance in everyday life. Most recently, she created Board of Us, a playful facilitation tool that she uses in her consulting work with clients ranging from soloprenuers and small business owners to established nonprofit organizations and multinational companies, including NBC, HBO, Shore Fire Media, Elixir Design and Girls for Gender Equity.
Thursday
Sep
22
2016
Thursday, September 22, 2016 from 5-8pm
5-8pm
**NOTE: The actual date for this hearing is not yet scheduled. We'll let you know when it is.** Join us in speaking up for people ­focused transportation in Oregon. Oregon needs to adopt a transportation package that reflects the priorities of Oregonians. Safe routes for walking and bicycling and plenty of convenient transit options benefit Oregon communities. Our neighbors can get to their jobs, children can walk and bike safely to and from school, drivers face less congestion on the roads, and the air is easier to breathe. If quality transportation in Oregon is important to you, join us in late-September in Salem for an important public hearing. We need to show lawmakers that this issue is important to us. ** After you RSVP here=> http://bit.ly/25HOGtj you will hear from organizers with more information. ** Thank you for helping us ensure Oregon is spending our money wisely on a modern transportation system that provides options to all of our community members! https://www.facebook.com/RenewOregon/events# https://www.facebook.com/events/851409781669887/
Thursday, September 22, 2016 from 6:30-8:30pm
6:30-8:30pm
Magical Poetics: Inhabiting the Ritual Word Taught by Megan Freshley Thursdays || September 1st - 22nd || 6:30 - 8:30 pm Social Justice Action Center || 400 SE 12th Ave. Four weeks, $100 || Space is limited. What is magic exactly, and how does it relate to poetic craft? Poets often cite a connection with with the magical imagination as a source for their work. If we look at the word as a magical unit, we can inhabit the writing rituals of poets from various traditions and explore possibilities for making more room for magic within our own writing. In this course, we’ll unpack the relationship between magic and poetry through the lenses of rhetoric, Romance, literary theory, the creation of personal rituals, digital communication, and more. Beginners and experienced poets are welcome. “I am certain of nothing but the holiness of the heart’s affections and the truth of imagination.” — Keats Week 1: Romance + Rhetors What is performative utterance and how can it help us bring the "truth of imagination" into our daily lives? We'll explore the connective tissue between the mystical and the mundane via ancient thinkers, literary theorists and the Romantic poets. Week 2: Magic in 20th Century Poetics If language is a magical medium, then we can use it to experience and alter our environment. We’ll look at 20th century poets who used their craft for social activism as well as the nature poets who branched from the Romantic tradition. Week 3: Ritualizing the Creative Process How are some of the magically-inclined poets of our times operating, and how do their creative processes come into play? Why are witches having a cultural moment, and what are all those witches up to? We will brainstorm our own tailor-made poetic rituals. Week 4: Performative Utterances Share your own ritual-derived creative work generated during the course, or just observe your classmates' projects. Leave with a broadened framework for continuing your own poetic practice. Megan Freshley is a writer, editor, and witch living in Portland, OR. She taught writing at PSU and served as an editorial assistant for McSweeney’s Poetry Series. Megan’s work is published in Stay Wild, 1001, Poor Claudia: Phenome, and Witch Craft Magazine. She was a 2013 recipient of the Academy of American Poets Prize.
Thursday, September 22, 2016 at 7pm
7pm
Thursday, September 22, 2016 from 7-8:30pm
7-8:30pm
Direct Action Organizing Taught by Kent Smith Thursdays || September 8th - 29th || 7:00 - 8:30 pm Taborspace || 5441 SE Belmont St. Four weeks, $89 || Space is limited. 10 tuitions waivers are available to members of marginalized communities who would like to teach the course material to their community. Contact coordinatorpugspdx.com for info + instructions. Make a significant contribution to Social Justice by winning concrete change at both the local and systemic levels. Learn the principles of Direct-Action Organizing: how to mobilize the grassroots to carry out effective campaigns that win. Organizing is the act of mobilizing a community for action around its concerns, and for the long term. Direct Action is grounded in non-violent Civil Disobedience--in using the Power the people have to interrupt injustice--from boycotts and protest marches to building takeovers, sit-ins and the calculated breaking of unjust laws. Direct Action Organizing itself is the best way to show others how to Organize for Direct Action: teach through doing. Using a mix of readings, videos, discussion and experiential learning exercises, this course will cover the history of Organizing in America (and in Portland) while de-centering the Whiteness that has historically accompanied it. Participants will sketch and plan out their own idea for a Direct-Action Organizing campaign. You will finish this course with skills and strategies to plan, organize and implement effective protest campaigns, and to teach others to do the same. Week 1: Why We Fight What are our personal interests in Direct-Action Organizing? (If you're not sure about yours, this class is a safe place to figure it out.) We'll share our expectations, needs and goals for the course and discuss how our group will define “Organizing for Direct-Action”. We'll also take a brief trip through the history of Organizing. Week 2: Principles of Direct-Action Organizing What is the different between a Leader and an Organizer? Is it true that Organizing a community is the best way to teach its members how to Organize? We'll reflect of some of the giants of Organizing history and share ideas for de-centering Whiteness in Organizing. Week 3: Envisioning Protest Campaigns What are the typical elements of an Organizing Drive? Break-out groups will discuss the social justice concerns nearest and dearest to them and individuals begin to explore a critical approach to crafting a campaign around their social justice priorities. Week 4: What We Want to Do How might we go about Organizing a community for change? Look ahead while hearing about further resources and education for the aspiring Organizer. We'll reflect on the course and share some of the actions (if any) we are committed to taking, moving forward. Kent Smith is a former Organizer with ACORN and with the Oregon Student Association.
Friday
Sep
23
2016
Friday, September 23, 2016 from 5-6pm
5-6pm
Friday, September 23, 2016, 5:00-6:00 PM 2 Years of US War on Syria Friday Rally and March w/Portland Peaceful Response Coalition Pioneer Courthouse Square, SW Yamhill and Broadway
Saturday
Sep
24
2016
with
SOLVE
Saturday, September 24, 2016 from 8am-5pm
8am-5pm
Venue:
@
SOLVE Office
Join thousands of volunteers on September 24 for the SOLVE Beach & Riverside Cleanup as we take care of Oregon’s neighborhoods, parks, and natural areas. It’s an easy, fun way to get outside, meet your neighbors, and make a difference by cleaning up litter and marine debris, removing invasive plants, or planting native trees and shrubs at project sites along the entire coast and across the state. Part of the International Coastal Cleanup and National Public Lands Day, this event has been a family-friendly Oregon tradition for over three decades. Get involved today and make a difference for tomorrow! Visit solveoregon.org or call 503-844-9571 ext. 332 or 1-800-333-SOLV for more details.
Saturday, September 24, 2016 at midnight through Sunday, September 25, 2016 at midnight
midnight through Sunday, September 25 at midnight
with
Surfrider
Saturday, September 24, 2016 at midnight through Sunday, September 25, 2016 at midnight
midnight through Sunday, September 25 at midnight
with
Surfrider
Saturday, September 24, 2016 at midnight through Sunday, September 25, 2016 at midnight
midnight through Sunday, September 25 at midnight
Saturday, September 24, 2016 at 8:30am
8:30am
This all-paved course follows a gentle stretch of the Clackamas River featuring pristine views of the river, shading forests, interesting geology and the occasional bald eagle or osprey keeping an eye on things. Most of the point-to-point course is closed to vehicles.
with
SOLVE
Saturday, September 24, 2016 from 9am-1pm
9am-1pm
Venue:
@
Dalton Point
Love the Columbia River Gorge? Help protect its wildlife and beautiful places by volunteering for a Fall Beach and Riverside Cleanup. Join rangers, rain or shine, in picking up litter at Dalton Point's beaches. While you're here, keep an eye out for herons, eagles, and osprey as you work, then, visit the Gorge's many waterfalls and colorful towns afterwards! All tools and gloves provided, just bring snacks, water, and a friend! Activities include: Litter Cleanup.
with
SOLVE
Saturday, September 24, 2016 from 9am-noon
9am-noon
Join Friends of Nadaka to restore a healthy habitat at Nadaka Nature Park. We will be removing invasive species such as English ivy and Himalayan blackberry from the forest. Tools, gloves, training and light refreshments will be provided. Dress to work in natural areas: long pants, brimmed hat, and closed-toe sturdy shoes. Please bring a water bottle and a friend! Businesses, schools and community groups are welcome! Activities include: Invasive Plant Removal, Litter Cleanup, Working in the Community Garden.
with
SOLVE
Saturday, September 24, 2016 from 9am-noon
9am-noon
Venue:
@
Baltimore Woods
For the past five years, SOLVE and the City of Portland have partnered up to restore Baltimore Woods - a 35-acre wildlife corridor which runs along the Willamette River and through St Johns. The City acquired the land, piece by piece, and SOLVE cleared the land of trash and hazards, removed invasive weeds, and planted hundreds of native trees, shrubs and flowers there. Now SOLVE is helping the local Friends of Baltimore Woods (FoBW) to nurture the young plantings, and restore the area to its natural state - a native oak woodland. On 9/24/16,SOLVE and FoBW are teaming up again to host a work party in Baltimore Woods. You are invited to join other volunteers in searching out native plants in the woods, clearing invasive weeds around each plant, and mulching the plant’s root zone with wood chips. The work is invigorating, but not strenuous. The land is hilly in spots, so boots are recommended. FoBW and SOLVE will provide all the guidance, tools (including gloves), refreshments and esprit de corps you may need. This will be a fun and inclusive community event. Families with children six-and-older are especially welcome. (P.S. Hey, veterans of past work parties in Baltimore Woods: Come, see how your plants are faring. I think you’ll be pleasantly surprised.) Activities include: Invasive Plant Removal.
with
SOLVE
Saturday, September 24, 2016 from 9am-noon
9am-noon
Venue:
@
Barrows Park
Join forces with New Seasons Market & Tualatin Hills Park & Recreation District to improve the natural areas that straddle Summer Creek in Barrows Park. This project will focus on removing invasive irises from the ponds in the park. New Seasons Market will provide breakfast snacks before the start of the project, between 8:30 - 9 a.m. Please bring a re-usable water bottle to drink from throughout the event. Tools, gloves, snacks and a water cooler will be provided. Activities include: Invasive Plant Removal, Litter Cleanup.
Saturday, September 24, 2016 from 8:30-11:30pm
8:30-11:30pm
We're growing and so is the annual Alice Awards + Auction! Join us for this brand new after party where we'll be revealing our new logo, dancing, playing games and celebrating going multimodal. This is an opportunity for even more of our friends to come celebrate and have fun! Your $30 ticket includes a complimentary drink ticket and food. There will be dancing, lots of games (such as a life-sized Connect Four and gold sprints), and the big reveal of our new brand. You'll also have the option to take it easy by the bonfire with a cup of Nossa Familia coffee. Learn more and purchase tickets here: www.btaoregon.org/alice2016 Get your multimodal on and join us as we we celebrate our expanded mission. Proceeds of the evening will help launch a statewide Safe Routes to School For Every Kid campaign that will prioritize Title 1 (low income) schools in Oregon.
Saturday, September 24, 2016 from 9:30-11:30am
9:30-11:30am
Decoding Plants: Seeing Urban Flora with New Eyes Taught by Mulysa Melco Saturdays, September 10th - October 1st || 9:30-11:30 am Meets at Overlook Park Picnic Shelter || 1599 N Fremont St. Four weeks, $100 || Space is limited to 20 students. Have you ever walked around your neighborhood, or gone on a hike, and wished you knew the names of the plants you saw? Have you ever wondered how they fit into the ecosystem and what uses they have? Deepen your connection with the place we live by tuning in to the world of plants and learning how the flora of our bio-region is in flux. Understanding the species we share our home with positions us to be advocates for conservation and offers tools for reimagining our personal and collective relationships to nature. In this class, you’ll learn to recognize 12 common plant families and how to identify species using a plant key. By the end of the course, you’ll have created your own guide to the major plant families – and you will have fresh eyes for the plants that live right outside your door. Week 1: Plant Patterns Explore taxonomy (how plants are classified according to their relationships) and morphology (the form and parts of a plant), and meet our first three plant families. Week 2: Micro Explorations Practice using a key to identify plants in a diverse garden setting. Using drawing as a way to understand our subject, slow down to observe some of the intriguing details that differentiate species. Learn the key recognition characteristics of three more families that include many important food plants. Week 3: Macro Observations Walk to an oak/madrone woodland and discuss how local plant communities in Portland have changed over time, why some plants are considered weeds and what future plant communities in the bio-region could look like. Get the scoop on three plant families that are essential for wildlife habitat. Week 4: Plant Uses Learn three final families that include plants that are essential for humans as medicine. Discuss ethnobotany and examples of ways plants have co-evolved with animal species in the human-managed landscapes of the Willamette Valley. Where to Meet Us: Overlook Park picnic shelter. 1599 N Fremont St, Portland, OR 97227. 1 block West of Overlook Park MAX station. What to bring: Sketch book (6x6” or larger, unlined white paper) pencil (No.2), eraser, pencil sharpener optional: a plant guide arranged by family or a Pacific NW botany book. What to wear: Dress for the weather and bring sun/rain protection, drinking water and whatever you need to be comfortable walking outdoors. Mulysa Melco is an ecological landscape designer, horticulturist and artist with a lifelong passion for plants and exploring our connection with the land.
Saturday, September 24, 2016 from 5:30-8:30pm
5:30-8:30pm
The annual Alice Awards + Auction has moved from May to September and tickets are now available! This is our biggest party of the year, and this year we're celebrating our expanded mission, going statewide with Safe Routes to School, as well as celebrating the people who have gone above and beyond to make our region one of the best places to bike, walk, and use transit. NEW: We are keeping the party going after the awards ceremony with an after party, Alice Encore. This is an opportunity for even more of our friends to come celebrate and have fun! Your ticket (included in the Alice Awards + Auction ticket price) includes a complimentary drink ticket and food. There will be dancing, lots of games (such as a life-sized Connect Four and gold sprints), and the big reveal of our new brand. You’ll also have the option to take it easy by the bonfire with a cup of coffee. Learn more and purchase tickets here: www.btaoregon.org/alice2016 Join us as we award winners, honor our past, reflect on our current work, and invigorate our members, supporters, volunteers, and staff for what's to come. Proceeds of the evening will help launch a statewide Safe Routes to School For Every Kid cammpaign that will prioritize Title 1 (low income schools) in Oregon. Interested in sponsoring? Please view our sponsorship opportunities here: https://btaoregon.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/2016-Alice-Awards-Sponsorship-Opportunities.pdf
Saturday, September 24, 2016 from 9:30am-noon
9:30am-noon
Bring your family to beautiful Champoeg State Park for a morning of fun and fitness to celebrate midwives organized by the Oregon Affiliate of the American College of Nurse Midwives! This is the 3rd annual Miles for Midwives 5k. Come ready to run, walk, push your stroller, or walk your dog! Young and old Runners or walkers Moms & strollers From Portland to Corvallis (and everywhere in between!) Groups and singletons And much more! This event aims to bring together those that support quality healthcare for women, families, and communities! Participants will complete a 5K! The course is an out-and-back on a well paved, mostly flat multi-use path. It’s simple: you run to the 5K station and turn around. Strollers and dogs will be welcomed on the course! We will provide informal and unofficial finish times for those interested. Individuals and groups are welcome to organize a theme, costume, or team color that unifies your team or a cause! Many people who plan to attend the event hope to share their pride in supporting midwifery and women's health… join with them if you would like! Proceeds from this year’s fundraiser will benefit services supported by the Oregon Affiliate of the American College of Nurse Midwives, including scholarships, education for midwives, legislative action that supports midwifery and access to healthcare for Oregon women and their families. 10% of registration proceeds will be donated to the Baby Blues Connection which supports women's mental health care during pregnancy and postpartum. Additionally we will be hosting a diaper drive for the Nurse Family Partnership, an organization that partners first-time moms with a caring home-visit nurse throughout their pregnancy and until their babies reach 2 years of age. Please bring a pack of diapers of any size to the race and they will be distributed to NFP locations throughout the state. Oregon Affiliate of the American College of Nurse Midwives: http://www.oregonmidwives.org/oregon/ Baby Blues Connection: http://babybluesconnection.org/bbc/ Nurse Family Partnership: http://www.nursefamilypartnership.org/
Sunday
Sep
25
2016
Sunday, September 25, 2016 from 11am-5pm
11am-5pm
The 9th competition of the Mad Bro Xtreme Amateur Games is a Scooter Comp. Cash, and prizes will be awarded. Winners are allowed to compete in the final. The Games consist of 10 competitions For BMX, Skate And scooter riders of all ages throughout this year . There are three levels for all ages , Beginner, Int. and advanced. Sign up online at madbroenterprises.com or at the Skate Park.
Sunday, September 25, 2016 at 3:30pm
3:30pm
Sunday, September 25, 2016 from 4:30-6:30pm
4:30-6:30pm
Portland Solidarity Network is an organization that is dedicated to fighting for our rights in the workplace and at home. This includes fighting sexism, racism, ableism, and other forms of discrimination in a way that empowers us and builds momentum to create a more equal world. Contact portlandsolidaritynetwork@gmail.com for more information.
Sunday, September 25, 2016 from 7-9pm
7-9pm
Screening of GAINING GROUND, a new documentary film on food justice. GAINING GROUND tells personal stories of rural and urban farmers making extraordinary changes to feed their local communities sustainably grown produce and grains. The documentary interweaves the lives of urban farmer-activists in inner city Richmond, California; a small family farm in rural Oregon converting from a commodity dairy to a sustainably grown produce farm; and a large commodity grass seed and Asian wheat farm in the Willamette Valley transitioning to growing organic grains. The film personalizes issues of class, gender, race and environmental justice, rooting them within the narratives of compelling individuals. While the movie is sober about the obstacles to creating change, it points the way toward hope. For more information go to: mediaprojectonline.org
Sunday, September 25, 2016 from 5-8pm
5-8pm
Join us in speaking up for people ­focused transportation in Oregon. Oregon needs to adopt a transportation package that reflects the priorities of Oregonians. Safe routes for walking and bicycling and plenty of convenient transit options benefit Oregon communities. Our neighbors can get to their jobs, children can walk and bike safely to and from school, drivers face less congestion on the roads, and the air is easier to breathe. If quality transportation in Oregon is important to you, join us on September 23 in Salem for an important public hearing. We need to show lawmakers that this issue is important to us. ** After you RSVP here=> http://bit.ly/25HOGtj you will hear from organizers with more information. ** Thank you for helping us ensure Oregon is spending our money wisely on a modern transportation system that provides options to all of our community members!https://www.facebook.com/RenewOregon/events# https://www.facebook.com/events/851409781669887/
Monday
Sep
26
2016
Monday, September 26, 2016 at 7pm
7pm
Monday, September 26, 2016 from 7-8:30pm
7-8:30pm
Rewilding 101: Ancestral Ways of Living for a More Resilient Life Taught by Peter Michael Bauer Mondays, September 12 - October 3 || 7:00-8:30 pm Hatch Space || 2420 NE Sandy Blvd. Four weeks, $91 || Space is limited to 20 students Climate change, environmental destruction, patriarchy, privilege, consumerism, health issues, lack of community, the disconnect from nature, world hunger, population growth...all are rooted from the same problem: the domestication of humans and of the wild over the last several thousand years. How did we get into this mess? From conservation biology to the paleo diet, people are realizing that the neolithic period has led humanity astray. Rewilding offers us a way out. This class is an intense crash course on what rewilding is, how you can rewild, and why you must. You will be able to apply these principle directly to your life, here and now. Join us on a journey through the ecological, anthropological, and psychological principles behind rewilding. We'll discuss the myths we've constructed about prehistoric peoples, the problems that came with the innovation of agricultural civilization, and the benefits of indigenous horticulture. You will finish the course aware of the various ways that people are rewilding, as well as the barriers that stand in the way. You will see how rewilding is viewed by the mainstream, and how to integrate it into your life in a way to that is respectful to indigenous populations. Week 1: Exploring Prehistory When did we lose our connection to the natural world? What is "pre" history, and why should we care about it? What is our "common knowledge" of cavemen? Plus, we'll review a timeline of human evolution. Week 2: Defining Rewilding What is our concept of ideas like "wild" and "wilderness"? How are people using the term "rewilding"? How do hunter-gatherers change the landscape? We'll also start to look at things like community-building, land access, and how rewilding is both an environmental and social justice movement. Week 3: Hazards of Rewilding We'll address how fear, economic status, legalities, cultural appropriation, and privilege relate to rewilding and how to go about it in a safe, helpful, and respectful way. Week 4: Rewilding in Action What does rewilding look like? What are some barriers to rewilding? We'll look at examples of current rewilders and rewilding communities and examine the possibilities for rewilding in the future, and taking things to the next level. Peter Michael Bauer is an environmental educator, author of the book Rewild or Die and founder of Rewild Portland.
Monday, September 26, 2016 from 6:30-9pm
6:30-9pm
Tuesday
Sep
27
2016
Tuesday, September 27, 2016 from 5-7pm
5-7pm
Join us for a monthly happy hour meet up and get to know some other fun cycling gals. This month we're headed to Vendetta on N Williams which has a full bar, tasty nachos, shuffleboard and a great patio. We'll meet at the top of the Esplanade (NE Lloyd and Oregon) at 5pm and will ride north at 5:20. Join us for a ride or meet us at Vendetta for eats and drinks. This event is open to all women, female-identifying, trans, and gender-nonconforming people who enjoy biking (or think that they might). Join the Women Bike group and RSVP (not required) at www.facebook.com/groups/womenbikebta
Tuesday, September 27, 2016 at 7pm
7pm
Tuesday, September 27, 2016 from 7-8:30pm
7-8:30pm
Hawaiian author and albatross activist Hob Osterlund will be in Heron Hall to discuss her book Holy Moli: Albatross and Other Ancestors, a meditation on the Laysan Albatross, Hawaiian mythology, and a journey of personal self-discovery. This event is free; contact the Nature Store at (503)292-9453 for more information.
Tuesday, September 27, 2016 from 6:30-8:30pm
6:30-8:30pm
The Problem with Privilege: Bias, Fragility + Taking Action to End Racism Taught by Christine Dupres Tuesdays, September 6-27 || 6:30-8:00 pm MarrowPDX || 7515 N Alma Ave. Four weeks, $150 || Space is limited || Scholarships available Acknowledging privilege proves to be a crucially important factor in understanding how structural racism and other "-isms" continue to exist. But understanding that you have privilege doesn't mean you understand what to do about it. Ignoring your privilege, however, allows racism and other -"isms" to thrive. This class is designed to help you be a better, more effective ally, especially if you're feeling stuck and ineffective. Fragility has uneven corollaries to non-white/non-male perspectives, but we will be addressing cultural privilege as a whole. This class will help you understand, identify, and interrupt implicit bias and white fragility, mechanisms that keep privilege in place. Note: This course is best suited to those who are familiar with and practiced in the basics of ally work. Week 1: Core Concepts for the Ally Racism and what it means to unpack privilege. Week 2: Defining Fragility Within the Rubric of Power and Privilege White fragility and how to recognize it. Where does white fragility show up in Portland? Week 3: Coalition of Communities of Color + Multnomah County Discussion of the Multnomah County Profile Reports from the Coalition of Communities of Color and more thoughts on white fragility in PDX. Week 4: Further Use of Concept and Tools Power protects itself. Other fragilities and ways we can interrupt them. Christine Dupres (Cowlitz/Cree), Ph.D., is a writer, teacher, and Native leader. She is the author of Being Cowlitz: How One Tribe Renewed and Sustained Its Identity (University of Washington Press). She has taught at the University of Pennsylvania and the University of Oregon.
Wednesday
Sep
28
2016
Wednesday, September 28, 2016 from 7-9pm
7-9pm
Create Your Own Quest: How To Imbue Your Time with More Meaning, More Joy + More Connection Taught by Melea Seward Wednesdays || September 7th - 28th || 7:00 - 9:00 pm SE Uplift || 3534 SE Main St. Space is limited to 25 participants. In Create Your Own Quest, we will discover ways to imbue your limited time on this planet with more joy, more meaning, and more connection. We will use TIME, ATTENTION, CONNECTION, and CURRENCY as constraints to help you create your own quest. In literature and films, quests often involve extensive travel and adventure, but your quest can also happen in your backyard, in your neighborhood, in your city, or on the web. Whether you want to visit every National Park in your lifetime, meet everyone who shares your first name in your zip code, or paint more, this course may be for you. Want to revive and pursue a dream that has faded? This is a great course to revisit and explore what is possible. Cost: It's $50 to enroll. At the end of the course, you will pay a second installment, the amount of which is completely up to you ($0 +), but reflects the value you received and the effort you created. Week 1: Thinking Bigger: Assessing What Is + Exploring the Possible As a culture, it seems we’re obsessed with life hacks, habits, and getting more done while spending less time on the doing. As adults, we tend to organize our lives around ATTENTION (what we pay attention to), CONNECTION (who we pay attention to), TIME (how we organize our days, weeks, month, years), and CURRENCY (how we pay for our lives, usually in some equation that factors in time and money). In this first class we will assess what is important to us and explore the possible. Week 2: Motion, Preparation + Divergence Luck favors the prepared. In the second week, we will look at famous and not-so-famous quests — we will break down how ordinary people have used constraints of time, space, place, money, and more to create more luck, or what I like to call, serendipity engines. It is difficult to stumble on an idea while seated, so we will look at ways to create more movement in your everyday life and prepare for the outcomes you’re interested in. Week 3: Commitment, Activation + Optimizing Connections How do you commit to an idea? How do you choose? In week three, through guided homework, readings, class discussion, and small group work, we will work on optimizing your connections with people and ideas. Week 4: Surprise + Delight Week four will be a co-facilitated class between the participants. You have to show up to see what happens. Melea Seward, Professional Generalist, is a communications and strategy consultant, speaker, improvisational storyteller and writer. She creates time-bound, rule-based projects and games that explore performance in everyday life. Most recently, she created Board of Us, a playful facilitation tool that she uses in her consulting work with clients ranging from soloprenuers and small business owners to established nonprofit organizations and multinational companies, including NBC, HBO, Shore Fire Media, Elixir Design and Girls for Gender Equity.
Wednesday, September 28, 2016 from 7-8pm
7-8pm
“Within These Walls” is an evening of thought-provoking presentation and conversation focused on the nature of solitary confinement, and it’s prevalence in the American prison system. This evening is the template for an evening to be presented in Portland, Oregon in late September of 2016. The evening will consist of two parts, performance and discussion. Performance will be a presentation of works performed by and donated by inmates around the theme of solitary confinement. Discussion will include members of the Oregon Department of Corrections, a state legislator, prison chaplains, and former inmates who have had personal experience with Solitary Confinement, possibly including Albert Woodfox, of the Angola Three (Still to be confirmed). We are already working on this event with Carlos Chavez and the Prison Pipeline program, but would love greater KBOO involvement.
Thursday
Sep
29
2016
Thursday, September 29, 2016 from 7-8:30pm
7-8:30pm
Direct Action Organizing Taught by Kent Smith Thursdays || September 8th - 29th || 7:00 - 8:30 pm Taborspace || 5441 SE Belmont St. Four weeks, $89 || Space is limited. 10 tuitions waivers are available to members of marginalized communities who would like to teach the course material to their community. Contact coordinatorpugspdx.com for info + instructions. Make a significant contribution to Social Justice by winning concrete change at both the local and systemic levels. Learn the principles of Direct-Action Organizing: how to mobilize the grassroots to carry out effective campaigns that win. Organizing is the act of mobilizing a community for action around its concerns, and for the long term. Direct Action is grounded in non-violent Civil Disobedience--in using the Power the people have to interrupt injustice--from boycotts and protest marches to building takeovers, sit-ins and the calculated breaking of unjust laws. Direct Action Organizing itself is the best way to show others how to Organize for Direct Action: teach through doing. Using a mix of readings, videos, discussion and experiential learning exercises, this course will cover the history of Organizing in America (and in Portland) while de-centering the Whiteness that has historically accompanied it. Participants will sketch and plan out their own idea for a Direct-Action Organizing campaign. You will finish this course with skills and strategies to plan, organize and implement effective protest campaigns, and to teach others to do the same. Week 1: Why We Fight What are our personal interests in Direct-Action Organizing? (If you're not sure about yours, this class is a safe place to figure it out.) We'll share our expectations, needs and goals for the course and discuss how our group will define “Organizing for Direct-Action”. We'll also take a brief trip through the history of Organizing. Week 2: Principles of Direct-Action Organizing What is the different between a Leader and an Organizer? Is it true that Organizing a community is the best way to teach its members how to Organize? We'll reflect of some of the giants of Organizing history and share ideas for de-centering Whiteness in Organizing. Week 3: Envisioning Protest Campaigns What are the typical elements of an Organizing Drive? Break-out groups will discuss the social justice concerns nearest and dearest to them and individuals begin to explore a critical approach to crafting a campaign around their social justice priorities. Week 4: What We Want to Do How might we go about Organizing a community for change? Look ahead while hearing about further resources and education for the aspiring Organizer. We'll reflect on the course and share some of the actions (if any) we are committed to taking, moving forward. Kent Smith is a former Organizer with ACORN and with the Oregon Student Association.
Friday
Sep
30
2016
October
2016
Saturday
Oct
1
2016
Saturday, October 1, 2016 from 9:30-11:30am
9:30-11:30am
Decoding Plants: Seeing Urban Flora with New Eyes Taught by Mulysa Melco Saturdays, September 10th - October 1st || 9:30-11:30 am Meets at Overlook Park Picnic Shelter || 1599 N Fremont St. Four weeks, $100 || Space is limited to 20 students. Have you ever walked around your neighborhood, or gone on a hike, and wished you knew the names of the plants you saw? Have you ever wondered how they fit into the ecosystem and what uses they have? Deepen your connection with the place we live by tuning in to the world of plants and learning how the flora of our bio-region is in flux. Understanding the species we share our home with positions us to be advocates for conservation and offers tools for reimagining our personal and collective relationships to nature. In this class, you’ll learn to recognize 12 common plant families and how to identify species using a plant key. By the end of the course, you’ll have created your own guide to the major plant families – and you will have fresh eyes for the plants that live right outside your door. Week 1: Plant Patterns Explore taxonomy (how plants are classified according to their relationships) and morphology (the form and parts of a plant), and meet our first three plant families. Week 2: Micro Explorations Practice using a key to identify plants in a diverse garden setting. Using drawing as a way to understand our subject, slow down to observe some of the intriguing details that differentiate species. Learn the key recognition characteristics of three more families that include many important food plants. Week 3: Macro Observations Walk to an oak/madrone woodland and discuss how local plant communities in Portland have changed over time, why some plants are considered weeds and what future plant communities in the bio-region could look like. Get the scoop on three plant families that are essential for wildlife habitat. Week 4: Plant Uses Learn three final families that include plants that are essential for humans as medicine. Discuss ethnobotany and examples of ways plants have co-evolved with animal species in the human-managed landscapes of the Willamette Valley. Where to Meet Us: Overlook Park picnic shelter. 1599 N Fremont St, Portland, OR 97227. 1 block West of Overlook Park MAX station. What to bring: Sketch book (6x6” or larger, unlined white paper) pencil (No.2), eraser, pencil sharpener optional: a plant guide arranged by family or a Pacific NW botany book. What to wear: Dress for the weather and bring sun/rain protection, drinking water and whatever you need to be comfortable walking outdoors. Mulysa Melco is an ecological landscape designer, horticulturist and artist with a lifelong passion for plants and exploring our connection with the land.
Sunday
Oct
2
2016
Sunday, October 2, 2016 from 4:30-6:30pm
4:30-6:30pm
Portland Solidarity Network is an organization that is dedicated to fighting for our rights in the workplace and at home. This includes fighting sexism, racism, ableism, and other forms of discrimination in a way that empowers us and builds momentum to create a more equal world. Contact portlandsolidaritynetwork@gmail.com for more information.
Monday
Oct
3
2016
Monday, October 3, 2016 from 7-8:30pm
7-8:30pm
Rewilding 101: Ancestral Ways of Living for a More Resilient Life Taught by Peter Michael Bauer Mondays, September 12 - October 3 || 7:00-8:30 pm Hatch Space || 2420 NE Sandy Blvd. Four weeks, $91 || Space is limited to 20 students Climate change, environmental destruction, patriarchy, privilege, consumerism, health issues, lack of community, the disconnect from nature, world hunger, population growth...all are rooted from the same problem: the domestication of humans and of the wild over the last several thousand years. How did we get into this mess? From conservation biology to the paleo diet, people are realizing that the neolithic period has led humanity astray. Rewilding offers us a way out. This class is an intense crash course on what rewilding is, how you can rewild, and why you must. You will be able to apply these principle directly to your life, here and now. Join us on a journey through the ecological, anthropological, and psychological principles behind rewilding. We'll discuss the myths we've constructed about prehistoric peoples, the problems that came with the innovation of agricultural civilization, and the benefits of indigenous horticulture. You will finish the course aware of the various ways that people are rewilding, as well as the barriers that stand in the way. You will see how rewilding is viewed by the mainstream, and how to integrate it into your life in a way to that is respectful to indigenous populations. Week 1: Exploring Prehistory When did we lose our connection to the natural world? What is "pre" history, and why should we care about it? What is our "common knowledge" of cavemen? Plus, we'll review a timeline of human evolution. Week 2: Defining Rewilding What is our concept of ideas like "wild" and "wilderness"? How are people using the term "rewilding"? How do hunter-gatherers change the landscape? We'll also start to look at things like community-building, land access, and how rewilding is both an environmental and social justice movement. Week 3: Hazards of Rewilding We'll address how fear, economic status, legalities, cultural appropriation, and privilege relate to rewilding and how to go about it in a safe, helpful, and respectful way. Week 4: Rewilding in Action What does rewilding look like? What are some barriers to rewilding? We'll look at examples of current rewilders and rewilding communities and examine the possibilities for rewilding in the future, and taking things to the next level. Peter Michael Bauer is an environmental educator, author of the book Rewild or Die and founder of Rewild Portland.
Monday, October 3, 2016 from 6-8pm
6-8pm
How to Ally with Portland's Urban Native Americans Taught by Christine Dupres (Cowlitz/Cree), Ph.D. Mondays, October 3-24 || 6:00-8:00 Marrow PDX || 7515 N Alma Ave. 4 weeks, $150 || Space is limited Native Americans face tricky sociopolitical and structural inequities in today's Portland. What does it mean to be an ally? Explore the issues impacting Native Americans, as well as the history behind them, and gain a language for supporting the lives and cultures of Native people. This experimental, silly, and interactive class will crush stereotypes and raise hell. In a fun way! You will finish this course better informed and better equipped to be part of a better future for Native Americans. Week 1: The Context for Urban Natives of Portland Who are we? Where are we? What are we doing now? Understand the unique characteristics of Urban Indians compared to other non­white urban populations, and to their reservation counterparts. Learn about federal policy toward Native peoples like the Doctrine of Discovery and its role in US expansion. We'll look at Portland's Native Indians as a case study and consider the contemporary impact of policies upon Native people. Week 2: Issues Facing Portland's Urban Native People Using a recent report from the Coalition of Communities of Color, we will look at some of the data describing the inequities Portland's Native people face. We'll also look at historical precedents, such as the termination of Oregon Tribes and relocation of reservation peoples to cities in the 1950s. Week 3: Quantum and other Quagmires: Let's Get Real Is there an appropriate means to recognize and define just what and who is an Indian? To obtain federal recognition and protection, American Indians, must constantly prove their identity. The current and past standard of “proof” has been blood quantum. Explore the role of cultural identification, the uses of quantum on other racial groups, and possible alternatives. Week 4: Brass Tacks:­ Being An Ally to Urban Natives In our final class, we look at contemporary ideas of privilege, considering the complexities of intersectionality and grappling with the idea of “white fragility.” We'll find a language and a framework for being an ally. Christine Dupres (Cowlitz/Cree), Ph.D. is a writer, teacher, and Native leader. She is the author of Being Cowlitz: How One Tribe Renewed and Sustained Its Identity (University of Washington Press). She has taught at the University of Pennsylvania and the University of Oregon.
Tuesday
Oct
4
2016
Tuesday, October 4, 2016 from 6:30-7:30pm
6:30-7:30pm
Most people THINK they know all the rules that relate to bicycling in Oregon...until they attend our FREE legal clinic. Join us for an intensive clinic concerning Oregon bicycle and pedestrian laws, insurance information, and what to do if you’re in a crash. Ray Thomas literally wrote the book on Oregon's bike-related laws. It's called "Pedal Power" and all attendees of his 60-minute clinic receive a free copy. Legal Clinics are in conjunction with Swason, Thomas, Coon, and Newton. RSVP here- http://bta.nonprofitsoapbox.com/october2016 Join the Facebook event here- https://www.facebook.com/events/175371916210942/ Questions? Contact Nicole Davenport at nicole@btaoregon.org
Wednesday
Oct
5
2016
Wednesday, October 5, 2016 from 8-9am
8-9am
In Her Shoes: Empowerment Breakfast Who: Dress for Success Oregon, a local anti-poverty nonprofit organization that empowers women to achieve economic independence by providing a network of support, professional attire and the development tools to help women thrive in work and in life. What: Dress for Success Oregon’s annual fall fundraiser draws together business, civic and social leaders. This year we will have a panel discussion, including our clients and HR Specialist, Anne Mersereau, on concrete ways employers can create a space to help women who are struggling not only arrive but thrive in the workplace. We are excited to announce Sheila Hamilton, journalist and radio host, as our keynote speaker. When: Wednesday, October 5, 2015, 8am-9am Where: The Sentinel Hotel, 614 SW 11th Avenue Portland, OR 97205 Who Should Attend: Press, business & social leaders, government officials, community supporters, HR , supervisory and management professionals. Contact: Jenny Jameson Development & Communications Manager Dress for Success Oregon jennyj@dressforsuccessoregon.org | 503.249.7300, x106 Our Website: https://oregon.dressforsuccess.org Event Website: https://oregon.dressforsuccess.org/get-involved/events/empowerment-breakfast-2016/ Cost: Ticket - $65, Table - $650, Corporate Table - $750, Plus Sponsorship Opportunities
Wednesday, October 5, 2016 from 8-9:30am
8-9:30am
In Her Shoes: Empowerment Breakfast Who: Dress for Success Oregon, a local anti-poverty nonprofit organization that empowers women to achieve economic independence by providing a network of support, professional attire and the development tools to help women thrive in work and in life. What: Dress for Success Oregon’s annual fall fundraiser draws together business, civic and social leaders. This year we will have a panel discussion, including our clients and HR Specialist, Anne Mersereau, on concrete ways employers can create a space to help women who are struggling not only arrive but thrive in the workplace. We are excited to announce Sheila Hamilton, journalist and radio host, as our keynote speaker. When: Wednesday, October 5, 2016, 8am-9am Where: The Sentinel Hotel, 614 SW 11th Avenue Portland, OR 97205 Who Should Attend: Press, business & social leaders, government officials, community supporters, HR , supervisory and management professionals. Contact: Jenny Jameson Development & Communications Manager Dress for Success Oregon jennyj@dressforsuccessoregon.org | 503.249.7300, x106 Our Website: https://oregon.dressforsuccess.org Event Website: https://oregon.dressforsuccess.org/get-involved/events/empowerment-breakfast-2016/ Cost: Ticket - $65, Table - $650, Corporate Table - $750, Plus Sponsorship Opportunities
Wednesday, October 5, 2016 from 7-9pm
7-9pm
Cascadia Earthquakes: Live with It! What will a Cascadia Subduction Zone earthquake likely do, and how will it affect you and those you care about? What should you do before, during and after? Wednesdays || October 5th-26th || 7:00-9:00 pm Multnomah Arts Center || 7688 SW Capitol Hwy.* Four weeks, $129 || Space limited to 28 students. What will a Cascadia Subduction Zone earthquake likely do, and how will it affect you and those you care about? What should you do before, during and after? We will discuss all this and more, including self-protection, the most important items to have in an emergency kit, tips for communicating with loved ones after an earthquake and suggestions for making your home safer. * Thinking a carpool from the east side would be nice? Let us know--we'll connect you with other interested students. Week 1: The Science of Earthquakes + What It Means to You Understanding earthquakes, from the general to Oregon/Pacific NW specifics. What are the short- and long-term impacts? How can we mitigate damage? How does this relate to individuals, families and neighborhoods? Week 2: The Human Side of Disasters Assessing vulnerabilities at home and at work and how you + your family can equip yourselves. What are the myths + realities about how people respond to disasters? Week 3: Walking through an Earthquake An in-class activity Week 4: Tool Time See examples of emergency kits + supplies. Share your earthquake preparedness plan and the steps you've taken. Jeff Rubin is the Emergency Manager for Tualatin Valley Fire + Rescue and former Vice Chair of the Oregon Resilience Task Force. Jeff has a BS in Geology + Geophysics from Yale University and an MA and PhD in Geological Sciences from University of Texas at Austin.
Thursday
Oct
6
2016
with
Surfrider
Thursday, October 6, 2016 at midnight through Friday, October 7, 2016 at midnight
midnight through Friday, October 7 at midnight
with
Surfrider
Thursday, October 6, 2016 from 6-7pm
6-7pm
Venue:
@
Sharkbites
Friday
Oct
7
2016
with
Surfrider
Friday, October 7, 2016 at midnight through Monday, October 10, 2016 at midnight
midnight through Monday, October 10 at midnight
Friday, October 7, 2016 from 5-6pm
5-6pm
Friday, October 7, 2016, 5:00-6:00 PM The Afghan Invasion 15 Years Later Friday Rally and March w/Portland Peaceful Response Coalition Pioneer Courthouse Square, SW Yamhill and Broadway Flyer
Saturday
Oct
8
2016
Saturday, October 8, 2016 from 5:30-9pm
5:30-9pm
Saturday, October 8, 2016 from 12:30-2pm
12:30-2pm
Feminist Meet Up, Brunch and Discussion Group is held on the second Saturday of every month from 12:30p-2:00p. Eat, drink, and bash patriarchy with fellow feminists! This discussion group is a friendly, open, exchange of ideas on a different topic each month. For the most up to date information, join us on www.facebook.com. Search for "Portland Feminist Meet-Up".
Saturday, October 8, 2016 from 9am-1pm
9am-1pm
Join us for the first of two plantings this season in partnership with the City of Hillsboro and Clean Water Services at Jackson Bottom Wetlands preserve. This planting is part of the Tree For All campaign which has planted over three million native plants in the Tualatin River Watershed in the past decade! Clean Water Services, Friends of Trees, thousands of volunteers, other non-profits, city partners, and private landowners will be working together this season to continue the success of this program. Please arrive around 8:45am to be registered and assigned to a crew. There will be an approximately 10 minute walk from the parking lot to the planting area. The event will start promptly at 9:00am. We provide breakfast snacks and hot chocolate/coffee, as well as gloves, tools and guidance. Please come dressed for the weather and wearing sturdy, closed-toe shoes and get ready to have fun! Looking to volunteer as a group? RSVPs are kindly requested for groups of more than 5 people - click HERE to do so. RSVPs are not required for individuals or groups of 4 or fewer -- you can simply show up! RSVPs are not required. Please contact Jenny or Randi at (503) 595-0213 if you have any questions or need more information. We look forward to seeing you out there!
Sunday
Oct
9
2016
with
Surfrider
Friday, October 7, 2016 at midnight through Monday, October 10, 2016 at midnight
midnight through Monday, October 10 at midnight
Sunday, October 9, 2016 at midnight through Monday, October 10, 2016 at midnight
midnight through Monday, October 10 at midnight
Sunday, October 9, 2016 from 4:30-6:30pm
4:30-6:30pm
Portland Solidarity Network is an organization that is dedicated to fighting for our rights in the workplace and at home. This includes fighting sexism, racism, ableism, and other forms of discrimination in a way that empowers us and builds momentum to create a more equal world. Contact portlandsolidaritynetwork@gmail.com for more information.
Sunday, October 9, 2016 from 7-8:30pm
7-8:30pm
Monday
Oct
10
2016
Monday, October 10, 2016 from 6-8pm
6-8pm
How to Ally with Portland's Urban Native Americans Taught by Christine Dupres (Cowlitz/Cree), Ph.D. Mondays, October 3-24 || 6:00-8:00 Marrow PDX || 7515 N Alma Ave. 4 weeks, $150 || Space is limited Native Americans face tricky sociopolitical and structural inequities in today's Portland. What does it mean to be an ally? Explore the issues impacting Native Americans, as well as the history behind them, and gain a language for supporting the lives and cultures of Native people. This experimental, silly, and interactive class will crush stereotypes and raise hell. In a fun way! You will finish this course better informed and better equipped to be part of a better future for Native Americans. Week 1: The Context for Urban Natives of Portland Who are we? Where are we? What are we doing now? Understand the unique characteristics of Urban Indians compared to other non­white urban populations, and to their reservation counterparts. Learn about federal policy toward Native peoples like the Doctrine of Discovery and its role in US expansion. We'll look at Portland's Native Indians as a case study and consider the contemporary impact of policies upon Native people. Week 2: Issues Facing Portland's Urban Native People Using a recent report from the Coalition of Communities of Color, we will look at some of the data describing the inequities Portland's Native people face. We'll also look at historical precedents, such as the termination of Oregon Tribes and relocation of reservation peoples to cities in the 1950s. Week 3: Quantum and other Quagmires: Let's Get Real Is there an appropriate means to recognize and define just what and who is an Indian? To obtain federal recognition and protection, American Indians, must constantly prove their identity. The current and past standard of “proof” has been blood quantum. Explore the role of cultural identification, the uses of quantum on other racial groups, and possible alternatives. Week 4: Brass Tacks:­ Being An Ally to Urban Natives In our final class, we look at contemporary ideas of privilege, considering the complexities of intersectionality and grappling with the idea of “white fragility.” We'll find a language and a framework for being an ally. Christine Dupres (Cowlitz/Cree), Ph.D. is a writer, teacher, and Native leader. She is the author of Being Cowlitz: How One Tribe Renewed and Sustained Its Identity (University of Washington Press). She has taught at the University of Pennsylvania and the University of Oregon.
Monday, October 10, 2016 from 6-7pm
6-7pm
Monday, October 10, 2016 from 7-9pm
7-9pm
Tuesday
Oct
11
2016
Tuesday, October 11, 2016 from 7-9pm
7-9pm
The public is invited to this monthly meeting of the Oregon Progressive Party. All are welcome, but only members get to vote on decisions.
Tuesday, October 11, 2016 at 7:30pm
7:30pm
Wednesday
Oct
12
2016
Wednesday, October 12, 2016 from 6-9pm
6-9pm
Wednesday, October 12, 2016 from 7-9pm
7-9pm
Cascadia Earthquakes: Live with It! What will a Cascadia Subduction Zone earthquake likely do, and how will it affect you and those you care about? What should you do before, during and after? Wednesdays || October 5th-26th || 7:00-9:00 pm Multnomah Arts Center || 7688 SW Capitol Hwy.* Four weeks, $129 || Space limited to 28 students. What will a Cascadia Subduction Zone earthquake likely do, and how will it affect you and those you care about? What should you do before, during and after? We will discuss all this and more, including self-protection, the most important items to have in an emergency kit, tips for communicating with loved ones after an earthquake and suggestions for making your home safer. * Thinking a carpool from the east side would be nice? Let us know--we'll connect you with other interested students. Week 1: The Science of Earthquakes + What It Means to You Understanding earthquakes, from the general to Oregon/Pacific NW specifics. What are the short- and long-term impacts? How can we mitigate damage? How does this relate to individuals, families and neighborhoods? Week 2: The Human Side of Disasters Assessing vulnerabilities at home and at work and how you + your family can equip yourselves. What are the myths + realities about how people respond to disasters? Week 3: Walking through an Earthquake An in-class activity Week 4: Tool Time See examples of emergency kits + supplies. Share your earthquake preparedness plan and the steps you've taken. Jeff Rubin is the Emergency Manager for Tualatin Valley Fire + Rescue and former Vice Chair of the Oregon Resilience Task Force. Jeff has a BS in Geology + Geophysics from Yale University and an MA and PhD in Geological Sciences from University of Texas at Austin.
Thursday
Oct
13
2016
with
Surfrider
Thursday, October 13, 2016 from 6-7pm
6-7pm
Venue:
@
Sharkbites
Friday
Oct
14
2016
Friday, October 14, 2016 from 9am-noon
9am-noon
Join us to care for the trees that we've planted as a part of our restoration efforts at this 23 acre park in SE Portland. This event is in partnership with Portland Parks & Recreation as a part of Parke-Diem, as well the Johnson Creek Watershed Council and is supported by the East Multnomah Soil & Water Conservation District and Metro. Volunteers should come dressed for the weather and wearing sturdy, closed-toe shoes and get ready to have fun! Friends of Trees will provides gloves, tools, and planting guidance. Individuals and groups less than 5 people are kindly requested to sign-up to attend this event through the Parke-Diem registration form. If you have a group of 5 or more people, please use the Friends of Trees Group Registration Form. RSVPs are not required. Please contact Jenny or Randi at (503) 595-0213 if you have any questions or need more information. We look forward to seeing you out there!
Friday, October 14, 2016 from 6:30-8:30pm
6:30-8:30pm
Dirty Queer is an X rated open mic: a place to celebrate sexuality and strut your creative stuff! Hosted by renegade writer and poet Sossity Chiricuzio, Dirty Queer has proven itself to be a thought provoking evening of excitement, passion, laughter and full body shivers. We're looking for queer erotic entertainers of all sorts: dancers, jugglers, singers, musicians, comics, poets, storytellers, magicians, gender performers ... if you can do it in 5 minutes or less (w/ minimal props/equip), this open mic's for you! We average over 120 people a month, so come early if you want a seat. Everyone who attends has a chance to win door prizes from local businesses, as well as a percentage off items at our very own feminist bookstore and host, IOW! Your donation of $1-$5/person for this event goes directly to supporting IOW, and more donations are always welcome. Caveats: 18+, consent is key, no hate speech, sign up is first come, first serve. Need a dose of Dirty Queer sooner than that? Come check out our photos, samples, bios, videos, and podcast on our website: www.dirtyqueer.com. Contact: info@dirtyqueer.com
Saturday
Oct
15
2016
Saturday, October 15, 2016 at 9am through Sunday, October 16, 2016 at 4:30pm
9am through Sunday, October 16 at 4:30pm
PDX Permaculture Saturday, October 15 at 9:00 AM ***Dates for the 2016-17 course will be announced in May. RSVP with deposit to reserve your place*** The permaculture design course is a must-do for a... Price: 100.00 USD http://www.meetup.com/Portland-Permaculture-Meetup/events/229373047/
Saturday, October 15, 2016 from noon-2pm
noon-2pm
PFLAG Portland Black Chapter (PBC) hosts monthly meetings and socials to provide a safe space for LGBT African Americans, their friends and family, to engage in dialogue, self-reflection, connect with community members, socialize and network, and access support and resources.
Saturday, October 15, 2016 from 9am-1pm
9am-1pm
Friends of Trees is excited to continue our partnership this season with the City of Beaverton and Clean Water Services. This planting is part of the Tree For All campaign which has planted over three million native plants in the Tualatin River Watershed in the past decade! Clean Water Services, Friends of Trees, thousands of volunteers, other non-profits, city partners, and private landowners will be working together this season to continue the success of this program. Please arrive around 8:45am to be registered and assigned to a crew. The planting will start promptly at 9:00am. We provide breakfast snacks and hot chocolate/coffee, as well as gloves, tools and guidance. Please come dressed for the weather and wearing sturdy, closed-toe shoes and get ready to have fun! Looking to volunteer as a group? RSVPs are kindly requested for groups of more than 5 people - click HERE to do so. RSVPs are not required for individuals or groups of 4 or fewer -- you can simply show up! RSVPs are not required. Please contact Jenny or Randi at (503) 595-0213 if you have any questions or need more information. We look forward to seeing you out there!
Saturday, October 15, 2016 from 9am-noon
9am-noon
This planting is in conjunction with Portland Parks and Recreation, Bureau of Environmental Services, Metro, Friends of Errol Heights, Portland Parks Foundation, and The Johnson Creek Watershed Council as part of Portland Parks and Recreation's Parke Diem event! This is the first of four plantings at a newly acquired addition to Errol Heights Natural Area! Volunteers should come dressed for the weather and wearing sturdy, closed-toe shoes and get ready to have fun! Friends of Trees will provides gloves, tools, and planting guidance. Individuals and groups less than 5 people are kindly requested to sign-up to attend this event through the Parke-Diem registration form. Please select "Errol Heights Park" when entering your information on this form. Groups larger than 5 people can sign up via the Friends of Trees Group Registration form. RSVPs are not required. Please contact Jenny or Randi at (503) 595-0213 if you have any questions or need more information. We look forward to seeing you out there!
Saturday, October 15, 2016 from 9-10am
9-10am
Saturday, October 15, 2016 at 11am
11am
Popular with runners and walkers of all fashion; fast, slow and everywhere in between. This scenic course starts and finishes in Blue Lake Park, offers views of the Columbia River, with a hot dog picnic afterwards. Includes a ½ mile Kids’ Run, making this another great family event.
Saturday, October 15, 2016 from 9am-1pm
9am-1pm
This event is in partnership with Portland Parks & Recreation as a part of Parke-Diem, as well the Johnson Creek Watershed Council and is supported by the East Multnomah Soil & Water Conservation District, Friends of Errol Heights, and Metro. Volunteers should come dressed for the weather and wearing sturdy, closed-toe shoes and get ready to have fun! Friends of Trees will provides gloves, tools, and planting guidance. Individuals and groups less than 5 people are kindly requested to sign-up to attend this event through the Parke-Diem registration form. If you have a group of 5 or more people, please use the Friends of Trees Group Registration Form. RSVPs are not required. Please contact Jenny or Randi at (503) 595-0213 if you have any questions or need more information. We look forward to seeing you out there!
Sunday
Oct
16
2016
Saturday, October 15, 2016 at 9am through Sunday, October 16, 2016 at 4:30pm
9am through Sunday, October 16 at 4:30pm
PDX Permaculture Saturday, October 15 at 9:00 AM ***Dates for the 2016-17 course will be announced in May. RSVP with deposit to reserve your place*** The permaculture design course is a must-do for a... Price: 100.00 USD http://www.meetup.com/Portland-Permaculture-Meetup/events/229373047/
Sunday, October 16, 2016 from noon-2pm
noon-2pm
IOW holds its monthly Board meeting on the 3rd Sunday of each month. Meetings are held at In Other Words and are open to the entire community. Please join us to hear about our work, what's going on with the organization, and how you can plugin. Board minutes are available upon request. Email board@inotherwords.org for more info, or if you would like to request an agenda item.
Sunday, October 16, 2016 from 4:30-6:30pm
4:30-6:30pm
Portland Solidarity Network is an organization that is dedicated to fighting for our rights in the workplace and at home. This includes fighting sexism, racism, ableism, and other forms of discrimination in a way that empowers us and builds momentum to create a more equal world. Contact portlandsolidaritynetwork@gmail.com for more information.
Monday
Oct
17
2016
Monday, October 17, 2016 from 6-8pm
6-8pm
How to Ally with Portland's Urban Native Americans Taught by Christine Dupres (Cowlitz/Cree), Ph.D. Mondays, October 3-24 || 6:00-8:00 Marrow PDX || 7515 N Alma Ave. 4 weeks, $150 || Space is limited Native Americans face tricky sociopolitical and structural inequities in today's Portland. What does it mean to be an ally? Explore the issues impacting Native Americans, as well as the history behind them, and gain a language for supporting the lives and cultures of Native people. This experimental, silly, and interactive class will crush stereotypes and raise hell. In a fun way! You will finish this course better informed and better equipped to be part of a better future for Native Americans. Week 1: The Context for Urban Natives of Portland Who are we? Where are we? What are we doing now? Understand the unique characteristics of Urban Indians compared to other non­white urban populations, and to their reservation counterparts. Learn about federal policy toward Native peoples like the Doctrine of Discovery and its role in US expansion. We'll look at Portland's Native Indians as a case study and consider the contemporary impact of policies upon Native people. Week 2: Issues Facing Portland's Urban Native People Using a recent report from the Coalition of Communities of Color, we will look at some of the data describing the inequities Portland's Native people face. We'll also look at historical precedents, such as the termination of Oregon Tribes and relocation of reservation peoples to cities in the 1950s. Week 3: Quantum and other Quagmires: Let's Get Real Is there an appropriate means to recognize and define just what and who is an Indian? To obtain federal recognition and protection, American Indians, must constantly prove their identity. The current and past standard of “proof” has been blood quantum. Explore the role of cultural identification, the uses of quantum on other racial groups, and possible alternatives. Week 4: Brass Tacks:­ Being An Ally to Urban Natives In our final class, we look at contemporary ideas of privilege, considering the complexities of intersectionality and grappling with the idea of “white fragility.” We'll find a language and a framework for being an ally. Christine Dupres (Cowlitz/Cree), Ph.D. is a writer, teacher, and Native leader. She is the author of Being Cowlitz: How One Tribe Renewed and Sustained Its Identity (University of Washington Press). She has taught at the University of Pennsylvania and the University of Oregon.
Tuesday
Oct
18
2016
with
Surfrider
Tuesday, October 18, 2016 from 6:30-7:30pm
6:30-7:30pm
Laura's House, Newport OR (call (541) 815-3398 for directions)
Wednesday
Oct
19
2016
Wednesday, October 19, 2016 at midnight through Thursday, October 20, 2016 at midnight
midnight through Thursday, October 20 at midnight
Wednesday, October 19, 2016 at midnight through Thursday, October 20, 2016 at midnight
midnight through Thursday, October 20 at midnight
Wednesday, October 19, 2016 from 7-9pm
7-9pm
Wednesday, October 19, 2016 from 7-9pm
7-9pm
Cascadia Earthquakes: Live with It! What will a Cascadia Subduction Zone earthquake likely do, and how will it affect you and those you care about? What should you do before, during and after? Wednesdays || October 5th-26th || 7:00-9:00 pm Multnomah Arts Center || 7688 SW Capitol Hwy.* Four weeks, $129 || Space limited to 28 students. What will a Cascadia Subduction Zone earthquake likely do, and how will it affect you and those you care about? What should you do before, during and after? We will discuss all this and more, including self-protection, the most important items to have in an emergency kit, tips for communicating with loved ones after an earthquake and suggestions for making your home safer. * Thinking a carpool from the east side would be nice? Let us know--we'll connect you with other interested students. Week 1: The Science of Earthquakes + What It Means to You Understanding earthquakes, from the general to Oregon/Pacific NW specifics. What are the short- and long-term impacts? How can we mitigate damage? How does this relate to individuals, families and neighborhoods? Week 2: The Human Side of Disasters Assessing vulnerabilities at home and at work and how you + your family can equip yourselves. What are the myths + realities about how people respond to disasters? Week 3: Walking through an Earthquake An in-class activity Week 4: Tool Time See examples of emergency kits + supplies. Share your earthquake preparedness plan and the steps you've taken. Jeff Rubin is the Emergency Manager for Tualatin Valley Fire + Rescue and former Vice Chair of the Oregon Resilience Task Force. Jeff has a BS in Geology + Geophysics from Yale University and an MA and PhD in Geological Sciences from University of Texas at Austin.
with
Surfrider
Wednesday, October 19, 2016 from 6:30-8pm
6:30-8pm
Venue:
@
TBA
Thursday
Oct
20
2016
with
Hatch
Thursday, October 20, 2016 from 2-3pm
2-3pm
TICKETS: http://www.eventbrite.com/e/for-profit-activities-by-non-profit-organizations-workshop-tickets-20067017991 For Profit Activities by Non-Profit Organizations We will discuss the legal and tax rules applicable when a non-profit organization engages in revenue generating activity. At the end of this workshop, you will have more information about how to structure any for-profit activities by your non-profit organization. Your Expert: Kate Kilberg Room: The Conference Room Time of Day: 2:00 PM Duration: 60 minutes
Friday
Oct
21
2016
Saturday
Oct
22
2016
Saturday, October 22, 2016 at midnight through Tuesday, October 25, 2016 at midnight
midnight through Tuesday, October 25 at midnight
Friends of the Multnomah County Library holds an annual fall book sale to raise fund for the library. The event will take place October 21-24th at the Double Tree Exhibit Hall. At the sale we have thousands of gently used books, media, pamphlets, and more for customer to purchase. We will also have a Collector's Corner filled with wonderful curated collection from our online sales on select dates. For more information go to : http://friends-library.org/calendar/fall-book-sale-2016
Saturday, October 22, 2016 at midnight through Monday, October 24, 2016 at midnight
midnight through Monday, October 24 at midnight
The Portland VegFest is the largest all-vegan food and lifestyle event in the Northwest, with free food samples, prominent speakers, cooking demonstrations, a bookstore, restaurants, children’s activities, film screenings, and more.
Saturday, October 22, 2016 at 9am through Sunday, October 23, 2016 at 4:30pm
9am through Sunday, October 23 at 4:30pm
PDX Permaculture Saturday, October 22 at 9:00 AM The PDC often is remembered as the point where people say that everything began to change for them. In gaining a deep perspective and practical skill ... Price: 100.00 USD http://www.meetup.com/Portland-Permaculture-Meetup/events/229373047/
with
Surfrider
Saturday, October 22, 2016 at midnight through Sunday, October 23, 2016 at midnight
midnight through Sunday, October 23 at midnight
Saturday, October 22, 2016 from 9am-3pm
9am-3pm
Crew Leaders are trained volunteers who are crucial to successful Friends of Trees' events. They are trained to lead groups of volunteers in proper planting technique and maintain a fun and educational vibe at our events. Friends of Trees is aiming to plant tens of thousands of native trees and shrubs across Salem parks and green spaces this year. Help us make those goals a reality and register to become a crew leader with us! Crew Leaders commit to guiding small groups of planters at 3-4 Saturday morning plantings. Sign up to attend our Salem Crew Leader training! Click HERE to register and we'll send you more information. You may also contact Jenny or Randi at (503) 595-0213 if you have any questions or need more information. We hope to see you at training in October!
Saturday, October 22, 2016 from 9am-1pm
9am-1pm
This event is in partnership with the City of Tualatin and Clean Water Services. We will be planting hundreds of native trees and shrubs at Brown's Ferry Park. This planting is part of the Tree For All campaign which has planted over three million native plants in the Tualatin River Watershed in the past decade! Clean Water Services, Friends of Trees, thousands of volunteers, other non-profits, city partners, and private landowners will be working together this season to continue the success of this program. Please arrive around 8:45am to be registered and assigned to a crew. There will be a short walk from the parking lot to the project area. The event will start promptly at 9:00am. We provide breakfast snacks and hot chocolate/coffee, as well as gloves, tools and guidance. Please come dressed for the weather and wearing sturdy, closed toe shoes and get ready to have fun! Looking to volunteer as a group? RSVPs are kindly requested for groups of more than 5 people - click HERE to do so. RSVPs are not required for individuals or groups of 4 or fewer -- you can simply show up! RSVPs are not required. Please contact Jenny or Randi at (503) 595-0213 if you have any questions or need more information. We look forward to seeing you out there!
Sunday
Oct
23
2016
Saturday, October 22, 2016 at midnight through Tuesday, October 25, 2016 at midnight
midnight through Tuesday, October 25 at midnight
Friends of the Multnomah County Library holds an annual fall book sale to raise fund for the library. The event will take place October 21-24th at the Double Tree Exhibit Hall. At the sale we have thousands of gently used books, media, pamphlets, and more for customer to purchase. We will also have a Collector's Corner filled with wonderful curated collection from our online sales on select dates. For more information go to : http://friends-library.org/calendar/fall-book-sale-2016
Saturday, October 22, 2016 at midnight through Monday, October 24, 2016 at midnight
midnight through Monday, October 24 at midnight
The Portland VegFest is the largest all-vegan food and lifestyle event in the Northwest, with free food samples, prominent speakers, cooking demonstrations, a bookstore, restaurants, children’s activities, film screenings, and more.
Saturday, October 22, 2016 at 9am through Sunday, October 23, 2016 at 4:30pm
9am through Sunday, October 23 at 4:30pm
PDX Permaculture Saturday, October 22 at 9:00 AM The PDC often is remembered as the point where people say that everything began to change for them. In gaining a deep perspective and practical skill ... Price: 100.00 USD http://www.meetup.com/Portland-Permaculture-Meetup/events/229373047/
Sunday, October 23, 2016 from 4:30-6:30pm
4:30-6:30pm
Portland Solidarity Network is an organization that is dedicated to fighting for our rights in the workplace and at home. This includes fighting sexism, racism, ableism, and other forms of discrimination in a way that empowers us and builds momentum to create a more equal world. Contact portlandsolidaritynetwork@gmail.com for more information.
Monday
Oct
24
2016
Monday, October 24, 2016 from 6-8pm
6-8pm
How to Ally with Portland's Urban Native Americans Taught by Christine Dupres (Cowlitz/Cree), Ph.D. Mondays, October 3-24 || 6:00-8:00 Marrow PDX || 7515 N Alma Ave. 4 weeks, $150 || Space is limited Native Americans face tricky sociopolitical and structural inequities in today's Portland. What does it mean to be an ally? Explore the issues impacting Native Americans, as well as the history behind them, and gain a language for supporting the lives and cultures of Native people. This experimental, silly, and interactive class will crush stereotypes and raise hell. In a fun way! You will finish this course better informed and better equipped to be part of a better future for Native Americans. Week 1: The Context for Urban Natives of Portland Who are we? Where are we? What are we doing now? Understand the unique characteristics of Urban Indians compared to other non­white urban populations, and to their reservation counterparts. Learn about federal policy toward Native peoples like the Doctrine of Discovery and its role in US expansion. We'll look at Portland's Native Indians as a case study and consider the contemporary impact of policies upon Native people. Week 2: Issues Facing Portland's Urban Native People Using a recent report from the Coalition of Communities of Color, we will look at some of the data describing the inequities Portland's Native people face. We'll also look at historical precedents, such as the termination of Oregon Tribes and relocation of reservation peoples to cities in the 1950s. Week 3: Quantum and other Quagmires: Let's Get Real Is there an appropriate means to recognize and define just what and who is an Indian? To obtain federal recognition and protection, American Indians, must constantly prove their identity. The current and past standard of “proof” has been blood quantum. Explore the role of cultural identification, the uses of quantum on other racial groups, and possible alternatives. Week 4: Brass Tacks:­ Being An Ally to Urban Natives In our final class, we look at contemporary ideas of privilege, considering the complexities of intersectionality and grappling with the idea of “white fragility.” We'll find a language and a framework for being an ally. Christine Dupres (Cowlitz/Cree), Ph.D. is a writer, teacher, and Native leader. She is the author of Being Cowlitz: How One Tribe Renewed and Sustained Its Identity (University of Washington Press). She has taught at the University of Pennsylvania and the University of Oregon.
Monday, October 24, 2016 at 7pm
7pm
Tuesday
Oct
25
2016
Tuesday, October 25, 2016 at 7pm
7pm
Wednesday
Oct
26
2016
Wednesday, October 26, 2016 at 7pm
7pm
Wednesday, October 26, 2016 from 7-9pm
7-9pm
Cascadia Earthquakes: Live with It! What will a Cascadia Subduction Zone earthquake likely do, and how will it affect you and those you care about? What should you do before, during and after? Wednesdays || October 5th-26th || 7:00-9:00 pm Multnomah Arts Center || 7688 SW Capitol Hwy.* Four weeks, $129 || Space limited to 28 students. What will a Cascadia Subduction Zone earthquake likely do, and how will it affect you and those you care about? What should you do before, during and after? We will discuss all this and more, including self-protection, the most important items to have in an emergency kit, tips for communicating with loved ones after an earthquake and suggestions for making your home safer. * Thinking a carpool from the east side would be nice? Let us know--we'll connect you with other interested students. Week 1: The Science of Earthquakes + What It Means to You Understanding earthquakes, from the general to Oregon/Pacific NW specifics. What are the short- and long-term impacts? How can we mitigate damage? How does this relate to individuals, families and neighborhoods? Week 2: The Human Side of Disasters Assessing vulnerabilities at home and at work and how you + your family can equip yourselves. What are the myths + realities about how people respond to disasters? Week 3: Walking through an Earthquake An in-class activity Week 4: Tool Time See examples of emergency kits + supplies. Share your earthquake preparedness plan and the steps you've taken. Jeff Rubin is the Emergency Manager for Tualatin Valley Fire + Rescue and former Vice Chair of the Oregon Resilience Task Force. Jeff has a BS in Geology + Geophysics from Yale University and an MA and PhD in Geological Sciences from University of Texas at Austin.
Thursday
Oct
27
2016
Friday
Oct
28
2016
Saturday
Oct
29
2016
Saturday, October 29, 2016 at 6am
6am
Recreational and competitive ultra-marathoners from all over the West enjoy this unique running experience. Red and yellow maples dominate the fall colors along the Willamette River course and neighboring Champoeg Park campsites (including Yurts) are popular with runners pre- and post-race. Runners are fed well during this endurance event.
Saturday, October 29, 2016 from 9am-3pm
9am-3pm
Crew Leaders are trained volunteers who are crucial to plant trees properly and lead groups of volunteers at more than 80 different planting events this planting season. Friends of Trees is aiming to plant tens of thousands of native trees and shrubs at more than 40 public planting events in the Green Space Program. Help us make those goals a reality and register to become a crew leader with us! The training is free (and includes lunch and a t-shirt!) but registration is required. Register HERE to train for this popular role. Spots are limited and this training will fill-up so register soon! Please contact Jenny or Randi at (503) 595-0213 if you need more information. We look forward to answering any questions you may have!
Sunday
Oct
30
2016
Sunday, October 30, 2016 from 9am-11pm
9am-11pm
New City Initiative began in 2010, with the purpose of fostering communities where all people achieve their full human potential. We envision a new community of mutually transformative relationships with communities across the greater Portland area with the power to end the intergenerational cycle of homelessness and poverty. On any given night in Multnomah County, 2000 children experience homelessness either on the streets, in shelter, doubled up with family or friends, at a transitional housing facility or in an apartment paid for by rent assistance. Homelessness and other adverse and traumatic childhood experiences cause these children to face greater barriers and obstacles in their education, employment and relationships. On October 30, we will be running and walking to end the cycle of homelessness and trauma for these children and their families. Watch how you can make an impact! https://youtu.be/xTCEo6C02sE https://www.facebook.com/events/1076885002387471/
Sunday, October 30, 2016 from 11am-5pm
11am-5pm
The Games consist of 10 competitions For BMX, Skate And scooter riders of all ages throughout this year . There are three levels for all ages , Beginner, Int. and advanced. Sign up online at madbroenterprises.com or at the Skate Park.
Sunday, October 30, 2016 from 4:30-6:30pm
4:30-6:30pm
Portland Solidarity Network is an organization that is dedicated to fighting for our rights in the workplace and at home. This includes fighting sexism, racism, ableism, and other forms of discrimination in a way that empowers us and builds momentum to create a more equal world. Contact portlandsolidaritynetwork@gmail.com for more information.
Monday
Oct
31
2016
November
2016
Thursday
Nov
3
2016
with
Surfrider
Thursday, November 3, 2016 from 6-7pm
6-7pm
Venue:
@
Sharkbites
Thursday, November 3, 2016 from 6:30-8pm
6:30-8pm
Friday
Nov
4
2016
Saturday
Nov
5
2016